Month: March 2021

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) The Matchless Love of Jesus (Steve Wallace)
2) Choices & Character (Bill Crews)
3) A Pardon Rejected (Anonymous)
4) Living According to the Standard (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
5) News & Notes
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The Matchless Love of Jesus

Steve Wallace

The Word of God tells of the matchless love of Christ which we celebrate in song. Indeed the Bible’s portrayal of the love of Christ is one which shows it to be unlike any love known to man. We could examine Christ’s love from the standpoint of the effects it has had on mankind where it has provoked change of life, devotion, praise, sacrifice, and wonderful works. However, such effects, no matter how marvelous, are only reactions to this unique love. Therefore, let us look at some things that the Bible says about it and, though dealing with a broad subject within a limited space, seek to know more about the matchless love of Jesus.

1. The background of his coming. God had loved Israel “with an everlasting love” (Jer. 31:3) and could say in the book at the end of the Old Testament canon, “I have loved you” (Mal. 1:2). However, his love was generally not requited. On the contrary, his people had largely rejected him in various ways throughout their history (Hos. 3:1f; Heb. 3:7-11; Matt. 21:33-44). Rightly does Isaiah write that “all we like sheep have gone astray” (Isa. 53:6). Through all this “God, willing to show his wrath (e.g., Sodom and Gomorrah, the flood, the Babylonian captivity), and to make his power known, endured with much longsuffering (i.e., he showed his love, Eph. 4:2) the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction” (Rom. 9:22). Having shown love for mankind through all its tragic history, God made the greatest demonstration of his love: he “so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (Jn. 3:16). Where on earth can one go to find such an example of love? The matchless love of Christ had its roots in a similarly matchless love.

2. His life. Love gives (Jn. 3:16) and Jesus’ life was a life of giving, a life of love. Though he existed in the “form of God,” Jesus “emptied himself, taking the form of a servant, being made in the likeness of men” (Phil. 2:6-7, ASV). “He came to his own, and his own received him not” (Jn. 1:11). Undaunted by the enemies he made, he “went about doing good” (Acts 10:38). Summing up his work, “The blind receive their sight, and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear, the dead are raised up, and the poor have the gospel preached to them” (Matt. 11:5). He taught that man’s primary obligation is to “love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind” and to “love thy neighbor as thyself ” (Matt. 22:37-39) and exemplified such love for all to see by his good works and by his keeping God’s commandments (Jn. 15:10). Though tempted, he “did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth” (1 Pet. 2:22). The life that he lived is without parallel; the love he exemplified is matchless!

3. His last day. We see our Savior’s matchless love from another perspective when we study some of the last deeds of his life. “Having loved his own which were in the world, he loved them unto the end” (Jn. 13:1). With the humiliation and pain of the cross looming up before him, he humbled himself, washing his disciples’ feet as an example to them (Jn. 13:15-16). As he was being led to Calvary, bloodied by the beating he had just received, he refused the sympathy of women who followed him, choosing rather to sympathize with them (Lk. 23:27-31). In spite of the intense pain he must have felt as he hung on the cross, his thoughts were of others: he prayed for his executioners, spoke salvation to one of the thieves, and saw to the care of his mother (Lk. 23:34,39-43; Jn. 19:25-27). “When he was reviled, (he) reviled not again; when he suffered, he threatened not” (1 Pet. 2:23). Through it all, he was the picture of perfect love. We search in vain for such an example in all the pages of all the books that have ever been written, save one: The Bible. “Oh what love, matchless love.”

4. His death. This sacrifice would be incomplete if we failed to note what the Bible says about our Lord’s death. He said, “No man taketh (my life) from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again” (Jn. 10:18). Jesus chose to lay down his life. “Hereby know we love, because he laid down his life for us” (1 Jn. 3:16, ASV). “But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us all” (Isa. 53:5-6). “For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us . . . when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son” (Rom. 5:6-10). Satan once said, “Skin for skin, yea, all that a man hath will he give for his life” (Job 2:4). It was love that caused Christ to overcome man’s natural aversion to dying, a love not quenched by the long history of man’s rebellion against God nor by the treachery which surrounded his death. “Oh what wondrous love I see freely shown for you and me!”

5. How should we then live? Love begets love (Jn. 15:9; 1 Jn. 3:16). Therefore, we should strive at “having the same love” Christ has shown us (Phil. 2:1-2). I suggest the following applications of his love to our lives:

1. We should love Christ’s body, the church (Eph. 5:25). He gave himself for it and we should do our part to keep it as he would have it, without “spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing” (Eph. 5:27).

2. We should love the truth which Jesus died to give man (Heb. 9:14-23; Jn. 8:32; 14:23; Gal. 5:6).

3. We should love our brethren (Phil. 2:1-2; 1 Jn. 3:16; 4:7).

4. We should love the lost (Jn. 3:16; Rom. 5:8).

5. Husbands should love their wives as “Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it” (Eph. 5:25).

6. We should cultivate love’s wonderful character so that it becomes a part of our personality (1 Cor. 13:4-8).

7. We should love our enemies (Matt. 5:43-48; Lk. 23:34).

Conclusion

Christ’s love is without comparison. Nothing which we might allow to influence us in this world can approach matching the one-of-a-kind love we find in Jesus, and our greatest endeavors are worthless without love (1 Cor. 13:1-3). May we all give ourselves to him because of the “love that will not let me go” and be “constrained” by it to walk closer to him each day (2 Cor. 5:14). Brethren, “keep yourselves in the love of God” (Jude 21).

— Via Guardian of Truth,  XXXVIII No. 23, pages 13-14, December 1, 1994 (http://www.truthmagazine.com/archives/volume38/GOT038310.html)
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Choices & Character

Bill Crews

Cunningham Geike, a Scottish preacher of the 19th century, wrote: “Our character is but the stamp on our souls of the free choices of good and evil we have made through life.” I believe his observation was correct.

We are free moral agents. The entire thrust of the Bible, addressed in its various parts and particulars to various individuals in the past and the present, is proof of this. God does not force men, but He does speak to men; and in speaking to men God instructs, reasons, warns, admonishes, promises, threatens, exhorts, encourages, appeals, pleads and implores. Man ever decides whether to listen or not; and upon listening, decides whether to respond or not; and, upon responding, decides what his response will be. For all of which God will call him to account. But man is indeed a free moral agent. He has volition. He has the freedom to choose.

Over and over man is placed in the position of making a choice (e.g., Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden [Genesis 2:16-17] and the Jews on the day of Pentecost [Acts 2:37-40]). Time and again men are called upon to choose. Moses said to Israel: “I call heaven and earth to witness against you this day, that I have set before thee life and death, the blessing and the curse: therefore choose life, that thou mayest live, thou and thy seed; to love Jehovah thy God, to obey His voice, and to cleave unto him; for He is thy life, and the length of thy days; that thou mayest dwell in the land which Jehovah sware unto thy fathers, to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, to give them” (Deuteronomy 30:19-20). Said Joshua to Israel: “And if it seem evil unto you to serve Jehovah, choose you this day whom ye will serve; whether the gods which your fathers served that were  beyond the River, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell; but as for me and my house, we will serve Jehovah” (Joshua 24:15). Said Elijah to the people of the northern kingdom of Israel: “How long go ye limping between the two sides? if Jehovah be God, follow Him; but if Baal, then follow him” (1 Kings 18:21).

Again and again you and I are placed in the position of making a choice between right and wrong:

1. As children, whether or not we will obey our parents. What does God say? Ephesians 6:1-3

2. As students, whether or not we will listen, learn, study, do our assignments, put forth a good effort, be honest, abide by the rules. What does God say? Romans 12:17; Ecclesiastes 9:10.

3. Whether we will choose good companions or evil companions. What does God say? 1 Corinthians 15:33.

4. Whether we will be careful or reckless drivers; whether or not we will obey the traffic laws. What does God say? Romans 13:1-7.

5. Whether or not we will be honest and dependable workers. What does God say? Luke 3:13-14; Colossians 3:22-4:1.

6. Upon hearing the gospel, whether or not we will become Christians or whether we will serve God or go on serving Satan. What does God say? Acts 2:41; 24:24-25; 26:28-29.

7. Upon becoming a Christian, whether or not to really be or live as a Christian. What does God say? 1 Peter 2:11-12; Romans 6:1-2; Colossians 3:1-2.

8. Whether or not we will be steadfast in prayer. What does God say? Philippians 4:6; Ephesians 6:18.

9. Whether or not we will diligently read and study our Bible? What does God say? 1 Peter 2:1-2; 2 Peter 3:18; Colossians 3:16.

10. Whether or not we will assemble faithfully with our brethren for Bible classes and worship assemblies. What does God say? Hebrews 5:11–6:3; 10:19-25.

The decision we make in each case will be largely determined by the guidance we have received and the character we have thus far molded, but every choice made makes a further impression upon our character and, in turn, will affect the choices that lie ahead. Good character can be destroyed in a brief span of time, but bad character can be reformed and sin can be forgiven. Our readers are challenged to make the right choice in every case that confronts them. God will help you if you want His help.

— Via Roanridge Reader, Volume 36, Issue 12, Page 4, March 21, 2021
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A Pardon Rejected

During the presidency of Andrew Jackson, George Wilson robbed a federal payroll from a train and in the process killed a guard. The court convicted him and sentenced him to hang. Because of public sentiment against capital punishment, however, a movement began to secure a presidential pardon for Wilson, and eventually Jackson intervened with a pardon. Amazingly, Wilson refused it.

Since this had never happened before, the Supreme Court was asked to rule on whether someone could indeed refuse a presidential pardon. Chief Justice John Marshall handed down the court’s decision: “A pardon is a parchment whose only value must be determined by the receiver of the pardon. It has no value apart from that which the receiver gives to it. George Wilson has refused to accept the pardon. We cannot conceive why he would do so, but he has. Therefore, George Wilson must die.” “Pardon,” declared the Supreme Court, “must not only be granted, it must be accepted.” George Wilson, as punishment for his crime, was hanged.

Likewise, God, through His mercy, has provided every human being pardon from their sins. However, that pardon must be accepted in the way God has ordained. Those who do not accept the pardon will perish.

– selected (via The Beacon, February 21, 2021)
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Living According to the Standard

Tom Edwards

Clicking on the following link will take you to the video sermon, entitled above:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Standard_032821.mp4

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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Jim Lively
recently began seeing a new doctor and undergoing new treatment at the Fyzical Therapy & Balance Center in Waycross, where he will be going twice a week for the exercise sessions to help regain his balance.  He also does these twice a day at home. His medication has also been adjusted because of an irregular heartbeat.

Rick Cuthbertson has six more weeks to go on his cancer-treatment meds until having another scan to see of the results.

Due to an irregular heartbeat, Shirley Davis will be having a procedure April 2.  She also has continual pain in her back, which is worse when standing.  

Also for prayer: Nell Teague, Malachi Dowling, Vivian Foster, Larry & Janice Hood, Ginger Ann Montero, Gege Gornto, Rex Hadley, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Jaydin Davis, Deborah Medlock, Chris Williams, and Cameron Haney.
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation.

 
evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) Higher Ground (Michael Brooks)
2) The Creator Revealed by Creation (Frank Walton)
3) Attitudes in Bible Study (Frank Himmel)
4) Pressing On to the Goal (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
5) News & Notes
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Higher Ground

Michael Brooks

“And seeing the multitudes, he went up on a mountain, and when he was seated his disciples came to him. Then he opened his mouth and taught them …” (Matthew 5:1-2).

We have a fascination with height. Mount Everest is the tallest mountain on earth, at over 29,000 feet in elevation. Millions travel just to look at it, and its allure as a trekking and climbing destination is legendary. Other peaks of far less altitude are also famous and prized as destinations. Most nations, states, and districts note their “highest points” and these are often featured as tourist destinations.

This fascination is not limited to geography. The tallest building, tallest man, and tallest animal are also items of note. Stories of giants, whether true (Goliath) or myth (the giant of Jack’s beanstalk) continue to provoke interest. We like the unusual, of course, but size, and especially height, seems to have a particular appeal.

It is easy to see that the Bible features mountains prominently. Examples include Ararat, where the Ark eventually landed (Genesis 8:4); Sinai where the Law was given to Moses (Exodus 19:20); Nebo, upon which Moses died (Deuteronomy 32:49); and the Mount of Transfiguration where Jesus’ authority was confirmed to the Apostles (Mark 9:2ff). Good things often happened upon mountains. God is often associated in special ways with the hills. The Psalmist proclaimed, “I will lift up my eyes to the hills — From whence comes my help? My help comes from the Lord who made heaven and earth” (Psalm 121:1-2).

Given this background, it is not surprising to read that Jesus went upon a mountain and there taught His disciples. We might well expect that. The geography of Palestine and the natural acoustical quality of such a setting also encourage its selection. But may we also infer a more spiritual application? Jesus taught from “higher ground” not only in the physical site of His sermon, but also in His moral, ethical, and theological perspectives. He was vastly superior to His contemporaries among the Jewish religious leaders in all these respects. His sincerity and truthfulness surpassed their hypocrisy. His love for the lost overshadowed their selfishness. His reverence for God made a mockery of their pride.

Genuine Christianity, when compared with any other religion or philosophy, is higher ground. It provides the greatest view of humanity, the only true revelation of God, and the single real hope that man can possess. As much as we love the scenery of Mount Everest, the engineering marvel of a huge sky-scraper, or the grace and power of a “7-footer” on the basketball court, the awesome heights of the Way of Christ are much greater. Jesus promised, “you shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” (John 8:32). His truth is incredibly beautiful. May we proclaim it and follow it always.

– Via The Susquehanna Sentinel, January 15, 2006
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The Creator Revealed by Creation

Frank Walton

“For by Him all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities — all things have been created through Him and for Him” (Col. 1:16).

Off the coast of British Columbia, the huge whales of the sea roam, which dwarf people. God’s power and intelligent design are revealed in nature.

I heard a scientist give a lecture in Whistler on the Black Bear. They hibernate up to 6 months, their heartbeat goes down to 5 beats per minute and take one breath per minute to conserve oxygen in the hollowed out tree they are sleeping for the winter. Their body has special proteins to help recycle water in their body during the months of hibernation. The ability to hibernate all winter could not have evolved gradually to survive months of freezing snow.

God’s beautiful design goes down even to the delicate complexity of the pollination of a flower. So, when we look at nature, we should see that a Great Mind and Power Hand are at work (Rom. 1:18-21).

“Worthy are You, our Lord and our God, to receive glory and honor and power; for You created all things, and because of Your will they existed, and were created” (Rev. 4:11).

 — Via Search for Truth, Volume X, Number 5, September 2, 2018
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Attitudes in Bible Study

Frank Himmel

The right motive is essential to profitable Bible study. We must desire to learn the truth that makes us free (John 8:31-32), to attain the wisdom that leads to salvation in Christ (2 Timothy 3:15).

The right motive is just one aspect of the right attitude in Bible study, however. Consider three other essential components.

Open Mind

Jesus said of some students in His day, “You will indeed hear but never understand, and you will indeed see but never perceive” (Matthew 13:14, ESV). Their problem was closed minds which made them unteachable. We must not be afraid to admit that we are ignorant or to learn that what we have thought is wrong. We must be willing to accept the truth, along with the changes it requires us to make.

Willingness to Work

Have you ever said about someone, “I wish I knew the Bible as well as he or she did”? Well, there was probably a time when that person said the same thing about someone else. Then, he started to work. The Bible contains 66 books, 1,189 chapters, over 31,000 verses, or about 800,000 words. Obviously, no one will master all that in a few sessions! It takes work — consistent effort over a long period of time. In fact, even the best Bible students are constantly learning throughout their lives.

The point is, you won’t get much out of Bible study if you don’t put much into it. A hit-and-miss approach yields little. (You can’t learn much about history or science or mathematics or anything else that way, either.) To thoroughly learn the Bible you have to invest some time and effort. The noble-minded Bereans “received the word with great eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily” (Acts 17:11). The blessed man meditates on what he reads (Psalm 1:2).

Expectation of Success

While learning the Bible might seem overwhelming at the beginning, when we break it down into segments and approach it in a systematic way, it is really not so difficult at all.

To be sure there are some challenging parts; the Bible says so (2 Peter 3:16). Nevertheless, it promises us that we can understand it (Ephesians 3:4). God commands us to know His will (Ephesians 5:17), and He does not require the impossible. You can learn! Why not get started today?

— Via The Beacon, September 6, 2020
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Pressing On to the Goal

Tom Edwards

The above is also the title for the sermon that was preached March 21, 2021. To play the video of it, just click on the following link while on the Internet:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Pressing_On_032121.mp4

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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Shirley Davis
will be having a procedure March 31, due to an irregular heartbeat.  She also continues to have back pain that is constant, but worse when on her feet.

Gege Gornto recently fell and broke her wrist and ulna, which required surgery. She is now back home healing. 

Jim Lively has been experiencing some chest pain, but recent tests (EKG, heart monitor, stress test, blood work) have not revealed anything serious.  He will be seeing his neurologist tomorrow.

Jaydin Davis can also use our prayers.  She has been having some episodes of fainting.

Also: Nell Teague, Malachi Dowling, Vivian Foster, Larry & Janice Hood,  Ginger Ann Montero, Rex Hadley, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Deborah Medlock, Chris Williams, and Cameron Haney.
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) God’s Regret and Foreknowledge (Kyle Pope)
2) A Clear View of Him Who is Invisible (Jason Hardin)
3) A Vital Perspective (Frank Himmel)
4) Fleeing and Pursuing (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
5) News & Notes
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God’s Regret and Foreknowledge

Kyle Pope

Although God chose Saul to be the first king over the nation of Israel, after he disobeyed the Lord’s command to destroy Amalek, the Holy Spirit records God’s declaration to Samuel — “I greatly regret that I have set up Saul as king, for he has turned back from following Me, and has not performed My commandments” (1 Sam. 15:11a, NKJV). This is restated, after Samuel told Saul that God had rejected him as king. The text records, “And Samuel went no more to see Saul until the day of his death. Nevertheless Samuel mourned for Saul, and the Lord regretted that He had made Saul king over Israel” (1 Sam. 15:35). This reveals a challenging issue concerning the nature of God. Scripture makes it clear that God “knows all things” (1 John 3:20), and is fully aware of all things that will happen in the future. David reveals that God knew the words he would speak before he said them (Ps. 139:4). Daniel said that God knows “what shall come to pass” (Dan. 2:29, KJV). God tells Isaiah that only He can “make known the end from the beginning” (Isa. 46:10, NIV). How then can it be that the actions of Saul caused God to feel “regret” (1 Sam.15:11, 35)?

The word used in 1 Samuel 15:11 and 35 is the Hebrew verb nacham. It means “to be sorry, console oneself, repent, regret, comfort, be comforted” (Brown, Drivers, Briggs, Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament, 636-637). The context determines when it has the positive sense of comfort and when it has the negative sense of sorrow or regret. For example, when Noah was born his father Lamech said, “This one will comfort (nacham) us concerning our work and the toil of our hands, because of the ground which the Lord has cursed” (Gen. 5:29, NKJV). When Isaac married Rebekah, Scripture tells us that in his marriage “Isaac was comforted (nacham) after his mother’s death” (Gen. 24:67). In other contexts, however, it can refer to the sorrow that leads to a change in behavior. For example, God, referring to the northern kingdom of Israel as “Ephraim,” the name of one of its most prominent tribes, quotes her to say, “Surely, after my turning, I repented (nacham); and after I was instructed, I struck myself on the thigh; I was ashamed, yes, even humiliated, because I bore the reproach of my youth” (Jer. 31:18-19).

This is the same word that is used in Genesis 6:6-7 concerning God’s anger over the wickedness of the world before the flood. Scripture declares, “the Lord was sorry (nacham) that He had made man on the earth, and He was grieved in His heart” (Gen. 6:6). This is restated after declaring His intention to flood the earth. The Lord said, “I am sorry (nacham) that I have made them” (Gen. 6:7b). Older translations put it that “it repented” God that He had done this (KJV, ASV). This, however, reflects a now archaic use of the word repent that does not involve wrongdoing. The New Oxford American Dictionary now defines the word repent to mean, “feel or express sincere regret or remorse about one’s wrongdoing or sin.” God cannot commit sin, and therefore cannot repent in that sense of the word.

A similar misunderstanding can arise from modern translations that render this word regret when applied to God. To say that God “regretted that He had made Saul king over Israel” (1 Sam. 15:35, NKJV, NASB, ESV), leaves the impression that God did not know what Saul would do. This is not the idea. James declared, “known to God from eternity are all His works” (Acts 15:18). The regret that God felt over Saul’s actions or the sinfulness of the world before the flood was not the result of ignorance or surprise. He knows what all men will do before they do it.

So how are we to understand God’s attitude toward Saul and the world before the flood? The key may rest in some parallel wording in each of these passages. Notice that in the text in Genesis while it first says that God was “sorry(nacham) it restates this in slightly different wording by adding that, “He was grieved in His heart” (Gen. 6:6b). This may be a type of Hebrew parallelism, by which the same idea is expressed in two similar ways for emphasis. If so, this would clarify that nacham when applied to God is not talking about repentance from wrongdoing, or regret over something God did not know, but sadness, sorrow, and grief over man’s actions. When one grieves it is not always over wrongdoing, or even something he did not know would happen. To grieve is to feel the pain caused by an action that takes place.

In the account of Saul’s sin we see a similar parallel construction. God was said to “regret” (NKJV, NASB) or be “grieved” (NIV) that He made Saul king, and Samuel is said to be “grieved” (NKJV, KJV), “distressed” (NASB), or “troubled” (NIV) by God’s decision to remove Saul (1 Sam. 15:11; cf. 15:35). Here the parallel is not two statements about God, but a statement about Samuel and God. Now, some translations make this seem as if Samuel’s attitude is that he “was angry” (RSV, NRSV) or “was wroth” (ASV) with God, but the same word for Samuel’s attitude is used in verse 35, again in parallel with God’s attitude and virtually all translations take it to refer to Samuel’s grief, sorrow, or sadness—not anger at God.  If this is a type of parallelism, this paints a different picture. It is not that God did not know what would happen. Instead, it simply shows the emotion that He felt when it actually happened. God’s foreknowledge did not take away the sorrow He felt when sin and rebellion happened in time.

In First Samuel there is another interesting use of this word in the same context. In verses 11 and 35 nacham is used of God’s sorrow over Saul’s action, but in verse 29 it is used twice of God’s unchangeable will. When Saul tried to argue with Samuel rather than simply acknowledge his sin, Samuel said of God, “the Strength of Israel will not lie nor relent (nacham). For He is not a man, that He should relent (nacham)” (NKJV). This is actually a paraphrase of a passage from the Law of Moses. God led Balaam to declare, “God is not a man, that He should lie, Nor a son of man, that He should repent (nacham); Has He said, and will He not do it? Or has He spoken, and will He not make it good?” (Num. 23:19). Both prophetic declarations reveal that when God has decided something, man cannot change His will. Is this a contradiction? In the same passage, is God at one point said to do something that a few verses later He is said not to do? Old Testament commentators Keil and Delitzsch suggest that these passages are approached from different perspectives. In First Samuel verses 11 and 35 they claim that God is speaking “anthropomorphically,” that is, as things appear to man (2.158). In other words, in human interaction with God something might appear to reflect a change, even though God knew all along what He would do. Keil and Deilitzsch go on to suggest that in verse 29, Samuel describes God “theomorphically,” that is, as things appear to God (ibid.). In other words, He knows what He will ultimately do, and does not change. Undoubtedly, when an infinite God communicates to finite creatures many things about His revelations are dependent upon whether they are seen from a divine or human perspective.

Clearly, there have been times when the prayers of men have been able to change God’s mind to some extent. When Israel sinned and God was ready to destroy the Israelites, Moses’s appeal to Him resulted in the fact that the, “Lord changed His mind (nacham) about the harm which He said He would do to His people” (Exod. 32:14, NASB). This doesn’t mean that God didn’t know what He would do all along, but sometimes the opportunities He offers to people to interact with Him in repentance and prayer are described in terms we can understand. Sometimes this appears to be a way of providing man the chance to change, or appreciate God’s mercy. The sorrow God felt over the wickedness of the world in the days of Noah, or the sinfulness of Saul was not something that caught Him by surprise. Rather, in revealing that these things brought Him sorrow it shows the pain that a loving God can feel when His creation rejects Him. Those who are His people should be moved by this and diligently seek to serve Him faithfully lest we “grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption” (Eph. 4:30; cf. Isa. 63:10).

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 23, Issue 10 (March 7, 2021)
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A Clear View of Him Who is Invisible

Jason Hardin

When we live with full eyes and empty hearts, assurance runs low and conviction wears thin. It’s hard to hope from an empty heart.

When we simply go with the flow of the world – walking and talking and acting and feeling by sight – there will always be plenty to keep our eyes full, but it’s hard to build conviction for things that are never granted my undivided attention. So prayer takes a backseat to the next Netflix episode, Bible reading gets pushed to the back burner of tomorrow, I’ll find the margin to worship on the weekend (as long as my eyes aren’t too full of other, more pressing things)… and I wonder in those dark nights of the soul why I’m struggling to hope with assurance and trust with conviction.

Hebrews 11 reminds us in the form of some powerful examples to look up from the cares and riches and pleasures of life to what cannot be seen with our physical eyes. Consider:

“Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance. And he went out, not knowing where he was going. By faith he went to live in the land of promise, as in a foreign land, living in tents with Isaac and Jacob, heirs with him of the same promise” (11:8-9).

Why? Why do such a thing? “For he was looking forward to the city that has foundations, whose designer and builder is God” (11:10).

Example after example is offered in Hebrews 11 of men and women who hoped with assurance and trusted with conviction. They lived by and died with faith in God’s promises, “having seen them and greeted them from afar” (11:13).

“By faith Joseph, at the end of his life, made mention of the exodus of the Israelites and gave directions concerning his bones” (11:22). Joseph could “see” something that wouldn’t happen in space and time for centuries.

“By faith Moses, when he was grown up, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter, choosing rather to be mistreated with the people of God than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin. He considered the reproach of Christ greater wealth than the treasures of Egypt, for he was looking to the reward” (11:24-26).

“He was looking.” In an era where most eyes were full of the gold and glitter of the Pharaohs, Moses lifted his eyes from the fleeting to focus on the eternal. And what came as a result? His heart wasn’t empty. His hope was sure. His conviction was strong. By faith, he was equipped to endure “as seeing him who is invisible” (11:27).

A clear view of him who is invisible. Think about that today. What could possibly be worth more?

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, March 2021
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A Vital Perspective

Frank Himmel

2 Timothy 3:16-17 is the Bible’s best-known statement of its claim to inspiration: “All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work.”

The word translated inspired is a compound term that literally means God-breathed. The ESV renders it “breathed out by God.” It is the same claim that Peter made for the Old Testament when he wrote, “. . . no prophecy of Scripture comes from someone’s own interpretation. For no prophecy was ever produced by the will of man, but men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit” (2 Peter 1:20-21, ESV).

The context of these two statements is similar.

Peter had reminded his readers that the gospel is eye-witness testimony, not a cleverly devised tale (1:16-18). It was vital that they remember the prophets’ words and the Lord’s commandments spoken by the apostles (3:1). This was especially the case in view of the fact that false teachers were on the horizon, men who would advocate more permissive standards than what God allows (2:1-22). Peter characterized their teaching as “destructive heresies” (v. 1).

Paul, too, was warning that “difficult times will come.” Men would hold a form of godliness but deny its power (4:5). They would oppose the truth (v. 8). They would deceive and be deceived (v. 13). Timothy was to avoid such people (v. 5) and continue in the instruction of the sacred writings (vv. 14-17), even though he would suffer for doing so (v. 12).

The point in these parallel contexts is obvious: a correct view of the Bible’s inspiration is vital to steadfastness.

Those who have firm faith in God-breathed Scripture will follow its instruction, regardless of what governmental officials or scholars or scientists of various stripes say. Scripture will override the latest studies every time! Neither will the faithful be duped by theologians or preachers who suggest that somehow the Bible does not mean what it says.

On the other hand, a lesser or looser view of inspiration opens the door to rejection of Biblical teaching. Commandments are reduced to suggestions. Sound words are no longer a pattern to be retained (1 Timothy 1:13) but a vague guideline that may be endlessly reinterpreted and adapted to suit . . . or just set aside altogether. To be sure, such folks may still hold to a form of godliness, but when you reject God’s word you reject His power for your life.

— Via Pathlights, February 7, 2021
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Fleeing and Pursuing

Tom Edwards

Clicking on the following link will take you to the video sermon preached March 14, 2021 on “Fleeing and Pursuing,” which is based on 1 Timothy 6:11:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Pursue.mp4

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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

We rejoice with the angels in heaven for our new young sister in the Lord!  Mikaela Jones was recently baptized into Christ for the remission of her sins and to become part of the family of God!   

It was also good to have several of our members back with us, after their having been away for some time, due to the coronavirus!

Jan Bartlett was not able to be with us Sunday, due to a very bad cold.

Ginger Ann Montero was also not feeling well enough to be with us Sunday.

And for continual prayer: the family and friends of Ann Vandevander who recently passed away; Also Nell Teague, Malachi Dowling, Vivian Foster, Larry & Janice Hood,  Jim Lively, Rex Hadley, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Shirley Davis, Deborah Medlock, Chris Williams, and Cameron Haney.
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent
 of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith
 in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) Boaz and Ruth: Ancient Examples for a Postmodern World (Greg Chandler)
2) Walking (Wayne Goff)
3) “OMG”  (R.J. Evans)
4) Divisions That Should Not Be (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
5) News & Notes
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-1-

Boaz and Ruth: Ancient Examples for a Postmodern World

Greg Chandler

The people of God are troubled by the rapid downward spiral of morality. While there is a host of reasons for this decline, the overarching principle can be summed up in the word postmodernism. Briefly defined, postmodernism is the belief that there is no absolute truth; instead, each determines personal truth and lives by this personal standard.

Though the term postmodern makes this idea sound new, it is ancient. The book of Judges attests to this fact with the author stating, “In those days there was no king in Israel. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes” (17:6; 21:25). The book of Judges illustrates Israel descending into tribalism and taking on the character of their Canaanite neighbors instead of their holy God. Several of the accounts recorded in the book are shocking even by 21st century standards. However, not everyone fell prey to this postmodern wickedness.

The short book of Ruth begins with the timestamp “in the days when the judges ruled” (1:1a). A reader who just finished the preceding book of Judges might expect a terrible story to follow and would likely continue that belief through the first part of the book. The storyline begins with a famine-stricken family traveling to another land. In their exile, the husband and two sons die, leaving only the now-widowed Naomi. Consumed with grief, she changes her name to Mara (bitter), stating, “The Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me” (1:20). While one can sympathize with the plight of Naomi, her bitterness temporarily shielded her from seeing one of the greatest blessings an individual can have: a friend.

While in exile, Naomi’s sons married Moabite women. After the sons’ deaths and Naomi’s decision to return home, both daughters-in-law offered to go with her, with Ruth making this a reality. Renouncing her people and gods, Ruth promised to stay by her mother-in-law’s side: “For where you go I will go, and where you lodge I will lodge” (1:16). Impoverished, Ruth took advantage of God’s protection of the poor (see Leviticus 23:22) and worked to provide for this family of two destitute women. With nothing for personal gain, she showed a spirit of selflessness uncommon in this wicked time.

As she cared for her mother-in-law, Ruth harvested in a field belonging to Boaz. While there was a likely physical attraction to Ruth, Boaz was more impressed by her ethic: “But Boaz answered her, ‘All that you have done for your mother-in-law since the death of your husband has been fully told to me, and how you left your father and mother and your native land and came to a people that you did not know before. The Lord repay you for what you have done, and a full reward be given you by the Lord, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to take refuge!’” (2:11-12). Boaz protected Ruth and blessed her with abundant portions. In a happy conclusion, Boaz married the young woman and willingly cared for her and Naomi. These two godly souls did right by others while their fellow countrymen did right in their own eyes.

Like Boaz and Ruth, godly individuals of the 21st century are surrounded by corruption; lack of respect for God, deviant sexual behavior, and antagonism for others are but a few of the commonalities with the time of the judges. In this situation, it would be easy to imitate Naomi and become bitter at the prospects that lay ahead. However, to do so would miss what Boaz, Ruth, and a host of godly people who lived in godless times teach: Be the light in the darkness. This is done by not giving up on God. While it may appear that “the Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me,” such a spirit restricts one from finding opportunities to let light shine. Just after explaining how His people would be persecuted, Jesus commanded, “Let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven” (Matthew 5:16). Even when it looks like the cause of righteousness is being defeated, give glory to the Father.

Echoing the Lord’s words, the apostle Paul encouraged godliness in this way: “So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith” (Galatians 6:10). The people of God will not defeat postmodernism at the ballot box, nor will they be able to lead a massive uprising to reclaim culture. Emulating the example of Boaz and Ruth, wickedness can be repulsed by doing good when and where one can. If the evening news creates alarm about the direction of society, turn it off and find an opportunity to help someone. In doing so, light will shine in darkness and God will be glorified.

This godly couple had no ambitions to have their story recorded for future readers; however, God knew it was needed. Not only did He record their story, He also allowed them to have a place in the genealogy of His Son. Christians have also been allowed to be a part of this family; commitment to glorifying God allows entry into His family through His Son (see II Timothy 1:9). In humility, may each modern child of God live like these ancient saints. May each honor God by doing good and, in the words of the old hymn, “brighten the corner where you are.”

— Via Bible Articles from the Gooch Lane church of Christ, March 7, 2021
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Walking

Wayne Goff

After my total knee replacement surgery, everyone has been concerned with how well I walk. Are you using a walker? Have you progressed to a cane? Are you able to walk unassisted? I appreciate the concern, and with the Lord’s help along with the doctor, nurses and therapists, I am progressing well. But like everything else in my experience, I began to compare my physical walk to our spiritual walk.

Walking: The Gospels

The word “walk” and its derivatives appear more than 100 times in the New Testament alone. This is not surprising, since man needs mobility to get along in life. Often in the Gospel accounts, “walk” refers to literal walking, or man’s inability to“walk.” Jesus cured the lame and gave them the ability to walk again (Matt. 9:5; 11:5). What a blessing! If Jesus could restore my original left knee to its perfect condition, how blessed would I be?

But we are more interested now with the figurative “walk.” The Pharisees asked Jesus the question: “Why do Your disciples not walk according to the tradition of the elders…?” (Mk. 7:5). They were obviously referring to the lifestyle of a Jew. John used this figure when the multitude of Jews stopped following Jesus: “From that time many of His disciples went back and walked with Him no more” (Jn. 6:66).

The disciple of Christ is expected to live according to the instructions of Christ. Jesus said in John 8:12, “…I am the light of the world. He who follows Me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life.” To walk in darkness is to walk in ignorance of Jesus’ teaching. Read John 11:9-10 and John 12:35 as well.

Walking: Acts & Epistles

The figure of “walking” is expanded in the rest of the New Testament. Acts 9:31 says, “Then the churches throughout all Judea, Galilee, and Samaria had peace and were edified. And walking in the fear of the Lord and in the comfort of the Holy Spirit, they were multiplied.” The new converts which made up churches of Christ in the first century walked “in the fear of the Lord,” or in obedience to His commands.

Throughout the world’s history, God has given man free will and permitted him to “walk” in his own ways (Acts 14:16). Free will though does not mean permission! God’s love, patience and longsuffering allowed man to walk according to his own dictates in order to learn that it is not in man to direct his own steps (Jer. 10:23)!

Disciples of Christ today “walk in the steps of the faith which our father Abraham had…” (Rom. 4:12). One is saved at the point of baptism and arises from the waters to “walk in newness of life” (Rom. 6:4). This new walk is in harmony with the Spirit (Rom. 8:1). It requires faith (belief, trust) in Jesus to live this way. “For we walk by faith, not by sight” (2 Cor. 5:7). So how do you walk by faith? By reading the New Testament, understanding what it says, and following its instructions.

Paul said “though we walk in the flesh, we do not war according to the flesh” (2 Cor. 10:3). We walk physically in this world, just like every other human being. But we do not live according to the walk of the world!

In the book of Ephesians, Paul repeatedly instructs us to “walk” properly. Walk “worthy of the calling with which you were called” (4:1), “walk in love” (5:2), “walk as children of light” (5:8), “walk circumspectly” (5:15). It is extremely important to “walk” (act) like a Christian should.

Falling?

Finally, with a new knee, it is important not to fall. “Therefore let him who thinks he stands take heed lest he fall” (1 Cor. 10:12). How important it is to not fall — in both the physical and the spiritual realm. So, dear reader, how is your walk?!

— Via Roanridge Reader, Volume 36, Issue 10, Page 3, March 7, 2021
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-3-

“OMG”

R.J. Evans

There is an expression, involving the name of God, which is used extensively today — “Oh my God!”  We hear it on TV, at work, at school, in the home — just about everywhere!  One of the most commonly used texting expressions today is “OMG” — “Oh my God!”  How close do we pay attention to the words that we use?  The words we choose to express ourselves are very important.  Our Lord tells how important it is to use proper speech in Matthew 12:36-37: “But I say to you that for every idle word men may speak, they will give account of it in the day of judgment.  For by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned.”  Thus, we should be very selective in choosing our words.

Since God is our Creator and Lord, we ought to speak of Him respectfully.  In Matthew 6:9, Jesus gave His disciples a model prayer.  He begins with “Our Father in heaven, Hallowed be Your name.”  “Hallowed” means “to hold as holy, sacred or revered.”  Under the Old Law (one of the Ten Commandments), God told the Israelites, “You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain, for the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain” (Ex. 20:7).  Taking God’s name in vain is to treat it lightly, as if it is useless, a part of idle speech, which manifests disrespect for His name.  The Hebrew word for “vain” comes from a word that means “to rush over something or to be careless with it.”  Some of the Jews were so concerned about not committing this sin that they went so far as to  totally avoid using certain names of God (such as Yahweh/Jehovah) in their normal conversations.

In Leviticus 19:12, there was a warning not to profane the name of God.  To profane the name of God is a serious matter.  The term “profane” means “to treat something sacred with abuse, irreverence or contempt.”

Let it be understood that we are not saying, nor are we implying, that the various names of God cannot be used in conversation.  They can and should be used, but, always in a reverent and respectful manner.  His name should never be used as an exclamation, “filler” or slang word, as is the case in today’s use of the phrase “Oh my God!” At times we hear people using other expressions as slang such as “My Lord!,” “Good Lord!,” “Lordy, Lordy!,” or “Oh Lord!”  And, again, the most commonly used expression in texting today is “OMG” — “Oh my God!”  As Christians we have the responsibility of keeping our speech pure and above reproach.  We must constantly guard against using the Lord’s name as an exclamation, a “filler,” flippantly, or in a vain and derogatory manner.

We are reminded of the words of the Psalmist: “Holy and reverend is His name” (Psa. 111:9)

— via R.J. Evan’s Facebook site, March 3, 2014
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-4-

Divisions That Should Not Be

Tom Edwards

This video sermon, as titled above, was preached March 7, 2021. To play it, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Divisions_030721.mp4
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-5-

News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

We extend our condolences to all the family and friends of Ann Vandevander who passed away recently.    

The medication Ginger Ann Montero is now on for her shortness of breath and congestive heart failure has been helping. She will be have some more tests performed this Wednesday.

Melotine Davis had an allergic reaction toward something that has caused her right eye to be swollen and shut and has affected the other eye almost the same way.

Doyle Rittenhouse had been nauseous last Sunday morning, due to the 2nd covid-19 vaccine he received.  But he is now doing better.

And for continual prayer: Rick Cuthbertson, Nell Teague, Malachi Dowling, Vivian Foster, Larry & Janice Hood, Jim Lively, Rex Hadley, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Deborah Medlock, Shirley Davis, Chris Williams, and Cameron Haney.

Daylight Saving Time begins March 14 at 2 a.m. 
Don’t forget to set your clock forward one hour before going to bed.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

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