Month: October 2021

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) Giving Thanks in Everything (Jerry Fite)
2) God Has His Own Clock (Don Wright)
3) Matthew 8:23-27 (NASB)
4) From Darkness to Light (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
5) News & Notes
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Giving Thanks in Everything

Jerry Fite

Paul exhorts all Christians to “Rejoice always; pray without ceasing; in everything give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus to you-ward” (I Thessalonians 5:16-18). Parents, raising children in the Lord, have witnessed the thanksgiving coming from hearts of young children in prayer. Before leaving the bedside, parents have heard their child thank God for everything important to them: their house, their room, their bed and yes, their pet fish, dog or cat. Parents should leave the child’s prayerful bedside gratified with the child’s thankful heart toward God, knowing God pays attention to gratitude and the lack thereof in His people. Did not Jesus say, “Were not the ten cleansed? But where are the nine?” (Luke 17:17)? when only a Samaritan returned to give thanks when ten men were miraculously healed of leprosy?

A closer look at Paul’s exhortation reminds us that Paul is not imploring God’s people to be thankful “for everything,” but “in everything.” We are to “give thanks in all circumstances” (I Thessalonians 5:18 ESV; NIV). As the child and the pets mature, the child should not be forced to thank God for the sudden death of their pet dog or cat. But the tearful maturing child could thank God for allowing him or her to enjoy such a great pet. Even a closer investigation of the Thessalonian text directs us to view all circumstances as they relate to being “in Christ.” Being thankful in everything, or in all circumstances, is connected with our relationship to our Lord. It is God’s will that we view the things that occur in our life through this Scriptural lens.

Paul gives us a great example of being thankful in all circumstances. He could rejoice and be thankful in Christ regarding the uncomfortable circumstances of imprisonment. Yes, he was suffering “hardship unto bonds,” which is never pleasant, but especially difficult to endure in a first century Roman prison. Yes, he was considered a “malefactor” or a criminal. So, how could he be thankful in such circumstances?  In the same breath he could say, “…but the word of God is not bound” (2 Timothy 2: 8-10). Eternal salvation in Christ through the good news of the Gospel cannot be shackled from the hearts of man when preached, even in prison.

During a separate imprisonment, Paul could rejoice and be thankful because his “bonds became manifest in Christ throughout the whole praetorian guard, and to all the rest” (Philippians 1:13). Knowing Paul’s work in defending the Truth, “…most of the brethren in the Lord, being confident through my bonds, are more abundantly bold to speak the word of God without fear” (Philippians 1:14).

Paul could rejoice with a thankful heart when a factious spirit in others was causing him personal harm. Some were proclaiming Christ “of faction, not sincerely, thinking to raise up affliction for me in my bonds” (Philippians 1:17). Paul was not rejoicing that some were proclaiming Christ out of sinful motives but “whether in pretense or truth, Christ is proclaimed; and therein I rejoice, yea and will rejoice” (Philippians 1:18).

Paul is not thankful for the restraint of chains, or the shame of being labeled a criminal. He is not even thankful for being in prison. He thanks God in such circumstances through the lens of being “in Christ.” Regardless of Paul’s circumstances, the saving Gospel is still reaching the lost and strengthening the saved! We too should give thanks in every circumstance, understanding how such allows us to exalt Christ in all things.

— Via Glad Tidings, Volume XXIX, No. 48, December 1, 2019
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God Has His Own Clock

Don Wright

One of the challenges that we face as children of God is to learn to wait on the Lord.  Waiting for anything is hard.  Most of us want what we want on our schedule, which usually means we want it sooner rather than later.  This mentality sometimes creeps into our dealings with God.  When we are anticipating a particular blessing from God, perhaps something for which we have recently prayed, it is easy to lose patience when the blessing does not arrive when we think it should.  Once in a  while, we forget that God operates on His own schedule. When we find this happening to us, we should remember the words of Isaiah.

Isaiah 40:31 (NKJV)

31  But those who wait on the LORD Shall renew their strength; They shall mount up with wings like eagles, They shall run and not be weary, They shall walk and not faint.

Waiting on the Lord is important.  Learning to do so can save us from self-induced problems.  Abraham and Sarah could have used this lesson while they were waiting for God to bless them with a son.

Their story begins in Genesis 12 when God called Abraham to go to a land that He was going to give to his descendants (Genesis 12:1-7).  In Genesis 12:7, we have the first hint that Abraham was going to have a lot of offspring, even though, at the time, he was seventy-five years old, and his wife was barren.  Ten years later, Abraham still did not have any children, and Sarai was growing very impatient.  In the sixteenth chapter of Genesis, we find Abraham and Sarah, (with the help of Sarai’s Egyptian maid), failing to wait on God.  Notice the plan that Sarah concocted, a plan that leaves God out of the picture.

Genesis 16:1-2 (ESV)

1  Now Sarai, Abram’s wife, had borne him no children. She had a female Egyptian servant whose name was Hagar. 2  And Sarai said to Abram, “Behold now, the LORD has prevented me from bearing children. Go in to my servant; it may be that I shall obtain children by her.” And Abram listened to the voice of Sarai.

Clearly, this entire scheme was thought up by Sarai and approved by Abraham, but was not what God had in mind.  It is very important that we keep God in all of our decisions. Putting God’s will and His glorification before our own is the essence of discipleship.  When we forget that, we tend to put ourselves before God and, it usually ends up being a disaster.

Proverbs 3:5 (ESV)

5  Trust in the LORD with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding.

Jeremiah 10:23 (ESV)

23  I know, O LORD, that the way of man is not in himself, that it is not in man who walks to direct his steps.

Sarai simply lost patience while waiting to bear Abraham a son.  Humanly speaking, we can sympathize with her.  Being barren was considered a dishonor in those days, and children were considered a blessing from God (Genesis 30:1; Psalms 127:3).  Still, this high-powered couple, both of whom are listed in the hall of fame of faith (Hebrews 11:8, 11), simply lost patience as they grew older and thought they could somehow help God out, or hurry Him up.

The story transpires in typical fashion. In following their humanly devised plan, it looks at first as if it was the right decision because Hagar indeed conceives a child for Abraham (16:4).  In the end, however, things fall apart.  Eventually, Sarai experiences humiliation, Abraham experiences misery, and Hagar experiences oppression. The ultimate consequence of Sarai and Abraham’s actions is the producing of a people, the Arabs, who became a problem for the people of God throughout history. Why did it happen?  Because they forgot, God has His own clock. Let us all learn to wait on the Lord.

— Via Brown Street Beacon, May 16, 2021
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Matthew 8:23-27

“When He got into the boat, His disciples followed Him. And behold, there arose a great storm on the sea, so that the boat was being covered with the waves; but Jesus Himself was asleep. And they came to Him and woke Him, saying, ‘Save us, Lord; we are perishing!’ He said to them, ‘Why are you afraid, you men of little faith?’ Then He got up and rebuked the winds and the sea, and it became perfectly calm. The men were amazed, and said, ‘What kind of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey Him?’”

— NASB
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From Darkness to Light

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link while on the Internet:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Darkness.mp4
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News & Notes

Folks to be keeping in prayer: Tammy Griffey, Rick Cuthbertson, Rex Hadley, Jim Lively, Bennie & Deborah Medlock, and Shirley Davis 
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) Pleasing God (Jerry Fite)
2) Jesus and Miracles (Frank Himmel)
3) An Important Key in Solving Marriage Problems (Tom Roberts)
4) Mark 12:28-31 (NASB)
5) Fighting the Good Fight of Faith (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
6) News & Notes
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Pleasing God

Jerry Fite

God created the heavens, the earth, the sea and all that in them is in six days (Exodus 20:11)! Under these four headings, one could spend many lifetimes writing about the numberless stars in the heavens, the variety of fish in the sea, the divergence of living creatures on earth and the complexity of man, whom God created in His own image. The Bible describes the experience in “Nature” as the handiwork of God (Psalm 19:1-2, 139:13-15). The eternal God is so wise and powerful, and so far above us. How could we ever do something so extraordinary that would grab His attention and please Him?

Maybe in the presence of our majestic God, we are thinking of a one-time-memorable-act to attract His attention, when we should be looking at an every-day-something which glorifies God and pleases Him. God reminds us, “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to Jehovah; but the prayer of the upright is His delight” (Proverbs 15:8). The eternal and self-existent “I Am” is pleased with the petition that comes from the upright person. Instead of thinking loftily of pleasing God by doing a great work for Him, we should remind ourselves that our God is pleased when we humbly express our need for Him.

 The upright offers up prayers expressing one’s trust in God. “Offer the sacrifices of righteousness, and put your trust in Jehovah” (Psalm 4:5). Reverential fear and confident hope connect the heart with the verbal petitions of the righteous, bringing joy to God. “Jehovah taketh pleasure in them that fear Him; in those that hope in His lovingkindness” (Psalm 147:11).

 While prayer from the righteous pleases God, the sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to Him. Isaiah was sent to a people who were shedding innocent blood while offering up sacrifices to be accepted by God. The holy God makes it clear that He wants nothing of this incongruity. “Bring no more futile sacrifices; Incense is an abomination to Me. The New Moons, the Sabbaths, and the calling of assemblies— I cannot endure iniquity and the sacred meeting. Your New Moons and your appointed feasts My soul hates; They are a trouble to Me, I am weary of bearing them. When you spread out your hands, I will hide My eyes from you; Even though you make many prayers, I will not hear. Your hands are full of blood” (Isaiah 1:13-14).

God does not only look at the deeds of man, but He sees our heart. “…Jehovah looketh not as man seeth: for man looketh on the outward appearance but Jehovah looketh on the heart” (I Samuel 16:7). The outward deeds are the extension of the heart in the inward man. The heart must be upright if God is to be pleased with our sacrifices and prayers. “The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise” (Psalm 51:17).

 If the heart is not upright, God will not hear our prayers. “If I regard iniquity in my heart, the Lord will not hear” (Psalm 66:18). The perverse heart issuing the perverse way is an abomination before the eyes of the Lord. “They that are perverse in heart are an abomination to Jehovah…” (Proverbs 11:20).

 Getting to the “heart” of the matter, the upright heart is the essential characteristic in our prayers being a delight before God. Even when we sin, we can change inwardly and come before God with a humble contrite heart knowing God will hear and forgive. “Be glad in Jehovah, and rejoice, ye righteous; and shout for joy, all ye that are upright in heart” (Psalm 32:11).

— Via Glad Tidings, Volume XXIX, No. 52, December 29, 2019
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Jesus and Miracles

Frank Himmel

In his first sermon, Peter introduced Jesus as “a man attested to you by God with miracles and wonders and signs which God performed through Him in your presence, just as you yourselves know” (Acts 2:22). Let’s begin a study of Jesus’ miracles with three observations from this verse.

One, Jesus performed miracles. Too many in our day try to dismiss the accounts of Jesus’ miracles as the exaggerations of over-zealous disciples. No, the New Testament is eyewitness testimony. “For we did not follow cleverly devised tales when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of His majesty” (2 Peter 1:16; cf. 1 John 1:1-3).

Jesus did many different kinds of miracles: various physical effects, such as walking on water; instant healing of numerous afflictions, including severed body parts; casting out demons; and in at least three instances He raised the dead. Unlike His disciples (e.g., Matthew 17:14-21), He never failed anything He attempted. Even His enemies acknowledged His miracles. The thousands gathered on Pentecost were well aware of Jesus’ deeds—“just as you yourselves know.”

Two, Jesus’ miracles manifested divine power. The word miracle is used rather loosely in modern times, often to denote merely outstanding or unusual events; for example, a team making a “miraculous” comeback in a game. Such things are not miracles at all. Genuine miracles require supernatural involvement. In Jesus’ activities, “God performed through Him.”

Peter used three terms: miracles, wonders, and signs.Miracle emphasizes the cause, divine power. It is from the same word as dynamite. Wonder points to the effect on witnesses. Sign states the purpose. Miracles say something. They have implications beyond the event, which brings us to. . .

Three, Jesus’ miracles proved who He was. He was “attested by God.” That means accredited or proved. Jesus claimed to be God in the flesh (John 5:18; 10:30). His miracles verified it. Jesus’ miracles are as critical to His identity as His teaching is.

When John the Baptist wanted to know if Jesus was the Expected One, Jesus pointed to His miracles (Matthew 11:2-6). The Lord told audiences who stumbled over His words, “If I do not do the works of My Father, do not believe Me; but if I do them, though you do not believe Me, believe the works, that you may know and understand that the Father is in Me, and I am in the Father” (John 10:37-38). The written record of Jesus’ miracles enables us to believe as surely as those who saw them firsthand (John 20:30-31).

— Via Pathlights, August 29, 2021
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An Important Key in Solving Marriage Problems

Tom Roberts

There have been times when I have been called in to ‘referee’ a marital dispute only to realize after hours of discussion that the real solution to the marriage problems was contained in The Golden Rule. If husbands and wives would really absorb what Jesus said and apply it to their situations, many problems would vanish immediately. Is there any husband so bold as to deny that he often acts selfishly, thinking only of his own wants and needs, with little attention to those of his wife? Can any wife deny that a similar blindness on her part is more than a little to blame in many disputes? If each of the marriage partners would ‘wear the shoes’ of their mates, they would see the need of ‘doing unto others as we would have them do unto us’ (as it is commonly paraphrased). No marriage counselor on earth could give better advice than to press home the meaning of these words to feuding husbands and wives.

— Via The Beacon, July 25, 2021
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Mark 12:28-31

“One of the scribes…asked Him, ‘What commandment is the foremost of all?’ Jesus answered, ‘The foremost is, “HEAR, O ISRAEL! THE LORD OUR GOD IS ONE LORD; AND YOU SHALL LOVE THE LORD YOUR GOD WITH ALL YOUR HEART, AND WITH ALL YOUR SOUL, AND WITH ALL YOUR MIND, AND WITH ALL YOUR STRENGTH.” The second is this, “YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AS YOURSELF.” There is no other commandment greater than these’” (NASB).

“On these two commandments depend the whole Law and the Prophets” (Matthew 22:40, NASB).
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Fighting the Good Fight of Faith

Tom Edwards

To hear the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link while on the Internet:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Fight_the_Good_Fight.mp4
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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Let us continue to remember Tammy Griffey in our prayers who had not been feeling well, had some tests run, and is to hear the results November 1.

Also, Shirley Davis as she is undergoing rehab for her injured foot.

Bennie Medlock had his second cataract surgery, and all went well.

Also keep Rex Hadley, Rick Cuthbertson, Deborah Medlock, and Jim Lively in prayer.
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) Is Everything We Do “Worship”? (Frank Jamerson)
2) “Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord…”
(Psalm 33:12) (John Gibson)
3) Matthew 17:1-3, 5 (NASB)
4) Lessons from 2 Timothy 4 (video sermon, Tom Edwards)   
5) News & Notes
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Is Everything We Do “Worship”?

Frank Jamerson

Several years ago, a preacher in the Christian church made the argument to me that if we cannot play an instrument in worship, we cannot play one anywhere, because everything we do is worship. In the May, 1990 issue of The Examiner, one of the anonymous writers said: “Is it wrong to play a piano and sing to God? If it is, then it is equally wrong to use a piano for any reason. 1 Corinthians 10:31 says, ‘Whether then you eat or drink or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.’ If you can’t use mechanical instruments to praise God then how can you justify their use at all?” (p. 8)

It may be difficult to distinguish between “service” and “worship” in some passages, but the fact that not everything we do is “worship” should be obvious from the meaning of the words as well as the way they are used in Scripture.

Let us notice the context of the quote from 1 Corinthians 10:31. Beginning with verse 14, Paul warns against idolatry. He then said that when Israel ate the sacrifices they were “partakers of the altar,” even so if the Corinthians ate the sacrifices of the Gentiles, they were having “fellowship with demons” (v. 20). They were admonished not to have fellowship with idolatry, but they could “eat whatever is sold in the meat market” (v. 25), if they understood that such action was not worship to the idol. However, if a weak brother said, “This was offered to idols, do not eat it for the sake of” his conscience (v. 28). If the action of eating meat was intended as worship to an idol, it was wrong. If the same action was done for a different purpose, there was nothing inherently wrong with it. Likewise, they did not “commune with Christ” every time they drank grape juice. Eating meat, or drinking grape juice may be worship or not worship, depending on your purpose. Verse 31 does not say “whether you eat or drink or whatever you do, you are worshiping.” It says that in eating and drinking, we should consider the consciences of our brethren, and thereby “glorify God.”

Jesus cleansed the temple twice, because men had failed to distinguish between “service” and “worship” (John 2:14-16; Matt. 21:12-13). The services of selling doves and making change were good works, but Jesus said that they were in the wrong place. The “house of prayer” had become a “den of thieves.” Maybe they thought that if they could not sell doves and make change in the temple, they could not do those things anywhere! Jesus did not buy their excuses, whatever they may have been!

W.E. Vine summarizes the definition of worship as: “Broadly it may be regarded as the direct acknowledgment to God, of His nature, attributes, ways and claims, whether by the outgoing of the heart in praise and thanksgiving or by deed done in such acknowledgment.” Thayer comments: “Among the Orientals, esp. the Persians, to fall upon the knees and touch the ground with the forehead as an expression of profound reverence… hence in the New Testament by kneeling or prostration, to do homage (to one) or make obeisance, whether in order to express respect or to make supplication.” Regardless of how obedient subjects may have been to the kings, they had not “worshiped” until they performed acts of reverence that were required by the kings. An example of that is found in Daniel 3. Though Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego were faithful servants of Nebuchadnezzar, when the order was given: “at the time you hear the sound of the horn, flute, harp, lyre, and psaltery, in symphony with all kinds of music, you shall fall down and worship the gold image that King Nebuchadnezzar has set up,” they refused to obey. In this we see a clear distinction between service and worship. If they mean the same, then the Hebrews had already “worshiped” Nebuchadnezzar, so why not bow to the image and avoid the fiery furnace?

In the first century those who refused to worship the Emperor were not permitted to “buy or sell” because they did not have the “mark of the beast” on their forehead or hand (Rev. 13:17; 14:9). Those Christians knew the difference between serving the Emperor and worshiping him, and it cost them dearly! There was, and is, nothing wrong with being obedient to the “decrees of Caesar,” but there is something wrong with worshiping him!

“Service” is a more general word and may be used to describe worship, but not all service is worship. Abraham told the young men with him that “the lad and I will go yonder and worship” (Gen. 22:5). After David’s son died, he “went into the house of the Lord and worshiped,” then he went to his own house and ate food (2 Sam. 12:20). The Ethiopian eunuch had gone to Jerusalem “to worship” (Acts 8:27). True worship has both an inward dimension and an outward dimension. It involves the attitude (“in spirit”) and the acts performed (“in truth”). If the worship was to the Emperor, it involved reverence expressed in whatever actions he required. If the worship is to God, it must be “in spirit and in truth” (John 4:24).

It is not true that if you can serve the emperor, you can worship him. Neither is it true that if you can play an instrument anywhere you can play it in worship, nor if you can wash feet anywhere you can wash them in worship, nor if you can eat meat anywhere you can eat it in worship! Worship is special acts offered reverently to a special Being. Men who made “the washing of hands” a religious requirement were “worshiping in vain” because such was not authorized of God (Matt. 15:9).

We need to be content in doing the things God authorized as “worship,” and “serve” him in all things. Those who make everything we do “worship” are on dangerous ground.

— via Articles of the Knollwood church of Christ, May 2012
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“Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord…”
(Psalm 33:12)

John Gibson

“When America ceases to be good, it will cease to be great,” said Alexis de Tocqueville. In this statement we are reminded that the greatness of a nation does not rest in its military power, social advancements, political acumen or its national wealth. A nation’s greatness is found in the quotient of its righteousness. Righteousness is the determining factor in a country’s future. Solomon, the wisest of men, said “Righteousness exalteth a nation; but sin is a reproach to any people” (Proverbs 14:34).

Theodore Roosevelt warned, “The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living and the get-rich-quick theory of life.” Is it possible that this day is drawing near? To a great extent our objectives have become: success, status, and security. These are followed closely by self-indulgence, pleasure, and comfort. Our permissive society turns freedom into license, rights into riots, and pornography into profit.

Concerned about a higher standard of living, we often fail to live by a standard. Riches are elevated above righteousness; power over piety; and science above the Savior. We abandon the moral law then shake our heads in disbelief as crime increases. Look out, America! Remember the words of Will Durant: “No great nation has ever been overcome until it has destroyed itself.”

If you really desire to be a patriot; if you are truly concerned about America; if you earnestly want God to bless her – Then live a life in harmony with the will of God.

— Via The Beacon, September 19, 2021
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Matthew 17:1-3,5

“Six days later Jesus took with Him Peter and James and John his brother, and led them up on a high mountain by themselves. And He was transfigured before them; and His face shone like the sun, and His garments became as white as light. And behold, Moses and Elijah appeared to them, talking with Him. . . . While he was still speaking, a bright cloud overshadowed them, and behold, a voice out of the cloud said, ‘This is My beloved Son, with whom I am well-pleased; listen to Him!’”  

— New American Standard Bible
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Lessons from 2 Timothy 4

To hear the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link while on the Internet:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/2Tim4_1-7.mp4
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News & Notes

Congratulations to Ronnie & Melotine Davis in the birth of their new great granddaughter, Addison Brooke Carines!

Let us continue to pray for Tammy Griffey who has not been feeling well and has not yet heard the results of her recent tests.

Lee & Vivian Foster are now healed from the Covid-19, and Vivian never did have any really bad symptoms from it.

Shirley Davis is now also healed from Covid-19 and was moved into a rehab clinic a couple weeks ago where she has begun treatment for her foot.

Let us also continue to remember the following in prayer: Rex Hadley, Rick Cuthbertson, Deborah Medlock, and Jim Lively.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


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