Year: 2022 (Page 1 of 4)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you, and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matt. 28:19,20).
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1) He Is Able! (Jon W. Quinn)
2) Lord, Liar, or Lunatic? (Heath Rogers)
3) Some Things God is Not (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
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He Is Able!

Jon W. Quinn

It was from Paul’s final home on earth – a prison cell in the city of Rome – that, as he was closing in on his final hour, he wrote the following words:

“For this reason I also suffer these things, but I am not ashamed; for I know whom I have believed and I am convinced that He is able to guard what I have entrusted to Him until that day” (2 Timothy 1:12).

Notice how that Paul, in this statement, progresses from the past to the present tense. He says “I know Him” (present tense) “whom I have believed” (past tense). There had been a time, or perhaps many times, in the past that Paul had placed his trust and confidence in the promises of Jesus and the power of God. At the time he writes, he is able to confidently affirm that he now knows that his past decisions in behalf of Christ were correct. His faith had been well placed.

He also knows that he will shortly be leaving this world. He talks of his approaching execution in very plain terms, but not with complaint or a sense of dread. Instead, it is all just the way things are, but it is all O.K. because there is an overwhelming anticipation of complete and eternal victory just beyond the final struggle (see 2 Timothy 4:6-8; 18).

The most awful and devastating tragedy is not to leave this world, but to leave this world unprepared to meet and stand before God in judgment. That is the danger! But, thanks unto Jesus, Paul had placed his confidence in Him and now death has lost it’s sting.

“I Have Believed Him”

The object of Paul’s faith and confidence was Jesus Himself. The giving of Jesus on the cross was powerful demonstration of the Father’s as well as the Son’s love for us (John 3:16). Paul believed the claims that Jesus had made about being the true light of men (John 1:19) and that Paul’s life had been so very productive and purposeful because Jesus had given it meaning (John 15:4). He believed in Jesus as “My Lord and my God” (John 20:28) and that He was indeed the only way to the Father (John 14:6).

Paul had believed the truth of Jesus’ message that being prepared to leave this world was more important than anything else. Jesus wanted all of us to know this and so used some of the most graphic language you can imagine to get His point across. Read His words and you will find it difficult to forget them! He meant it to be that way (Mark 9:42-48).

Paul believed that the Lord would watch over him and never, ever allow him to be tempted beyond his ability to endure (1 Corinthians 10:13).

We can have this same kind of confidence, but we must also be aware that without Jesus, any such confidence is built upon false hope. To come to God, we must believe that He is and believe in His promises given through His Son (Hebrews 11:6; John 8:21;24). And believing in Jesus means obeying Jesus (Luke 6:46).

“I Know Him”

Paul’s own relationship with Jesus had turned his belief into knowledge. It had been like climbing up a mountain. The higher one goes, the farther he can see. The farther he can see, the more he knows. The more Paul had seen in his life, the more he knew that placing his confidence in Jesus was the best choice he had ever made. With us as well, knowledge like this comes from drawing near to God. As we draw near, we too will begin thinking and speaking more in terms of forever as our goals take on eternity in their scope. “Therefore He is able also to save forever those who draw near to God through Him, since He always lives to make intercession for them” (Hebrews 7:25).

Even as Paul had come to know some things, so can we. John examines many things we can know in his first epistle. We can know Jesus and know that we are in Him (1 John 2;4,5). We can know that He is righteous (1 John 2;29). We can know that we will be like Him when He returns if we will purify ourselves now (1 John 3:1-3). We can know the love of God (1 John 4:16). We can know that we are of God (1 John 5:19; 4:1,6). We can know that the son of God has come (1 John 5:20).

There are definitely some things that we cannot know at this time, but there is plenty that we can know for sure. If one’s relationship with God is so shallow that he or she does not know anything for sure, then it is not what it ought to be. These are things we can know and they are extremely useful things to know. They are things that we come to know when we come to “know Him whom we have believed.”

“He Is Able”

Our God is an awesome God and all powerful. Just because He allows man to “strut his stuff” and choose his own course, even when the choices are extremely wicked, this does not mean He lacks power. It only means He affords us by His mercy and grace to have repeated opportunities to make correction and do what is right. We must not, as people often do, confuse God’s mercy and patience with a lack of power or will to execute judgment in His own appointed time.

Jesus is able to “guard” or “keep” that which we commit to Him. This means to keep safe what we commit to His care. When we commit the eternal well being of our souls unto Him, we need to know that He is able to keep our eternal salvation safe and secure. Our souls are protected by God’s power through our faith. “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who according to His great mercy has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to obtain an inheritance which is imperishable and undefiled and will not fade away, reserved in heaven for you, who are protected by the power of God through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time” (1 Peter 1:3-5).

Another reason for Paul’s confidence is that Jesus is not only able to “save” but to “save forever” those who “draw near” (Hebrews 7:25). As long as we live by faith God’s power will keep us safe. We therefore must not give up our faith, for if we leave it, we will also be without its security. We, as His sheep, must continue to follow His voice (John 10:27-29). James tells us that drawing near to God involves both submitting to His will as well as resisting Satan (James 4:7,8).

Our confidence in the Lord needs to be as strong as Paul’s. We, too, need to believe that “He is able.”  Recall how once a father pleaded unto Jesus in behalf of his ailing and possessed son, “But if You can do anything, take pity on us and help us!” Jesus responded, “‘If You can?’ All things are possible to him who believes” (See Mark 9:19-27). The man needed not have any doubt; Jesus could do whatever was needed. He can do likewise for us spiritually and eternally. Let our perspective, trust and confidence be as Paul’s was. It will help us to live in hope today, tomorrow, and bring us to the day of forever when that for which we hope will become our eternal victory.

— Via the Bradley Banner (from the Bradley church of Christ in Illinois),  April 27, 2003
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Romans 4:20-21

“He [Abraham] did not waver at the promise of God through unbelief, but was strengthened in faith, giving glory to God, and being fully convinced that what He had promised He was also able to perform” (NASB).
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Lord, Liar, or Lunatic?

Heath Rogers

In his book “Evidence That Demands A Verdict,” Josh McDowell sets forth the three alternatives available to man in determining who Jesus really is: He is either the Lord, a Liar, or a Lunatic.

Jesus claimed to be God (John 8:58). He claimed to be equal with God (John 10:30). He claimed to be able to forgive sins (Mark 2:5). He claimed to be the only means of obtaining eternal life (John 14:6). What are we going to do with these claims?

If we believe them to be true, we must accept the fact that Jesus is who He said He was – He is God.

If we reject these claims as being untrue, we have two alternatives regarding Jesus: He either knew these claims were not true, and thus was a liar, or He did not know these claims were untrue, and was Himself deceived.

If He knew His claims were not true, He is worse than a liar – He is a hypocrite, for He taught men to tell the truth, while He lied about who He was. Worse than that – He was evil, for He taught men that He was the only source of eternal life, knowing that He was not, thus condemning “believers” to an eternal Hell. Worse than that – He was a fool, for He eventually died because of His claim to be God, and no one willingly dies for what they know to be a lie.

If He sincerely believed He was God, when in fact He was not – He is a lunatic. It is possible for men to be sincerely mistaken, but Jesus did not “fake” the miracles which backed up His claims. The miracles performed by Jesus were not illusions or “parlor tricks.” Multitudes of people saw Jesus perform different kinds of miracles in which He displayed power over demons, disease, nature, and even death. Jesus was not crazy.

Jesus asked Peter, “Who do you say that I am?” (Matt. 16:15). This is the question every one of us must answer. After reading the gospels, we are left with three options regarding the identity of Jesus. He was either a liar, a lunatic, or He is the Lord. The answer to this question will determine our eternal destiny (John 20:30-31). Who do you say that He is?

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, December 2014
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Some Things God Is Not

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Some_Things_God_Is_Not.mp4

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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith
 in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Congregational Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)



The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) 1 Corinthians 3:10-15 (Bobby L. Graham)
2) What Was David’s Sin in Numbering Israel? (Kyle Pope)
3) Some Things Christ Does Not Know (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
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1 Corinthians 3:10-15

Bobby L. Graham

Question:

What does Paul mean in 1 Corinthians 3:10-15 when he speaks about a man’s suffering loss when his work is tried, but he is saved? Does this mean that one can teach false doctrine or practice sin and still be saved?

Answer:

The following brief analysis of this section of 1 Corinthians chapter three will prove helpful in answering this question. The church is identified as God’s vineyard or house in relation to the work done by men (1 Cor. 3:9b-17).

  • Just as the tilled land and the house originate as products of God’s skill and care, so the church is the result of His divine labor, which often includes His workers (v. 9b).
  • At Corinth, Paul had worked as a wise master builder (construction superintendent) and Apollos as a worker on the foundation laid by Paul (v. 10).
  • Every man working on this building must do so carefully, because he must build on Christ alone (vv. 10-11).
  • Paul viewed the work/converts of these workers as being of different quality (gold, silver, costly stones, wood, hay, stubble referring to different levels of stability or permanence when tested), which would be manifest by the trials coming (vv. 12-13). He shows the saints they were his work in the Lord in 9:1. Note that it is possible the word “day” in verse 13 refers to the Final Judgment, but it also could refer to the day of trial/testing coming to them. In the final analysis, which view one adopts has little impact on the overall meaning of this section.
  • The fiery trials may cause the worker to lose his labor, and he himself will be tested (vv. 14-15). He will be saved because of his faithfulness, though his converts become faithless.
  • He gave an additional warning to those destroying the temple of God/church (vv. 16-17).

The reader should notice that no reference is made to erroneous doctrine or practice in this section. To read such into any explanation of this problematic statement in verse 15 is unjustified. To do so is to be guilty of eisegesis (i.e., inserting into a passage what is not there), not exegesis (i.e., getting from a passage what is present). If a context does not deal with an idea, it is inexcusable to drag it into any explanation.

No, this statement does not justify the false teacher or one practicing sin by distinguishing between his sin and his salvation. It certainly does not teach that such a one can still be saved. The reader should study the following passages to learn that a saved person can fall from God’s grace and be lost (1 Cor. 10:12; Gal. 5:4; Heb. 3:12-14; 10:35-39; Jas. 5:19-20; 1 Pet. 1:3-5; 2 Pet. 1:8-11; Rev. 3:5).

— Via Truth Magazine, No. 9, Volume 63, September 2019

https://truthmagazine.com/kindle/2019/2019-09-sep/06_QnA.htm

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What Was David’s Sin in Numbering Israel?

Kyle Pope

The selection of the site where the temple in Jerusalem was built came about in a most unusual way. Because David took a census of the Israelites, God was angry with him and told David that He would exact a punishment on the people (1 Chron. 21:1-8; 2 Sam. 24:1-11). God gave David a choice of which punishment He would inflict: three (or seven) years of famine, three months of defeat at the hands of their enemies, or three days of plague by the “sword of the Lord” (1 Chron. 21:9-13; 2 Sam. 24:10-14). The judgment was that the Angel of the Lord destroyed seventy-thousand Israelites (1 Chron. 21:14; 2 Sam. 24:15). As the Angel came to destroy Jerusalem, the Lord stopped the destruction when the Angel came to the threshing floor of a man named Araunah (or Ornan) (1 Chron. 21:15; 2 Sam. 24:16). David purchased this land and provided it to his son Solomon for the site where the temple would stand (1 Chron. 21:16-30; 2 Sam. 24:17-25). This is the same site where the Temple Mount now rises over the Old City of Jerusalem.

To understand this unusual event we must ask the question posed in the title of this article: What was David’s sin in numbering the people?

Scripture does not directly answer this question, but a few things can be inferred and a few possibilities deduced. First, it is clear that unlike the census Moses took, this did not come at the command of God (cf. Num. 1:2). 2 Samuel 24:1 records, “the anger of the LORD was kindled against Israel, and he moved David against them” (NKJV). Did God cause David to do this? No. This must be harmonized with 1 Chronicles 21:1 which says “Satan stood up against Israel, and moved David to number Israel.” How can both statements be correct? 2 Samuel 24:1 must be understood in terms of what God allowed Satan to do—not direct action on the part of God. This may be compared with Job 2:3. After Satan was allowed to bring trial upon Job, God said to Satan, “he holds fast to his integrity, although you incited Me against him, to destroy him without cause.” The same word is used in 2 Samuel 24:1 (“moved”) and Job 2:3 (“incited”). Although one concerns God and David, and the other Satan and God, both are interesting because of what is demonstrated in God’s own words. Satan “incited” God “to destroy” Job, but God did not act directly—He allowed Satan to act and God speaks of this allowance as His own action. In the same way, God allowed Satan to act to “move” David, but 2 Samuel 24:1 speaks of God’s allowance as God’s action. So what does this tell us about why David’s action was sinful? It indicates that David’s action was not from God, but within Satan’s will. So, David did not act by the command of God, but acted presumptuously to take this action.

A second possibility concerns David’s motive. The text doesn’t identify David’s motive, but there may be some inference that he did this for military or political reasons. Why would this be an offense to God? A principle that runs throughout God’s covenant with Israel was the power of numbers as a reflection of whether Israel trusted in God or its own power. In Deuteronomy 7:7 God declared, “The LORD did not set His love on you nor choose you because you were more in number than any other people, for you were the least of all peoples.” When God sent Gideon to lead the Israelites, He declared, “The people who are with you are too many for Me to give the Midianites into their hands, lest Israel claim glory for itself against Me, saying, ‘My own hand has saved me’” (Judg 7:2). As a young man David had understood this. He told Goliath, “the LORD does not save with sword and spear; for the battle is the LORD’s, and He will give you into our hands” (1 Sam. 17:4). Yet, it may be that in his old age David had either forgotten this or lost the same trust in God he had as a young man. Joab seemed to recognize what this reflected about trust in God. Although he hoped that the people would be multiplied “a hundred times more than they are” (2 Sam. 24:3; 1 Chron. 21:3) he feared David’s action would bring guilt upon Israel. Each of the punishments that God offered would have resulted in a reduction in numbers (1 Chron. 21:11-14). What happens is that God essentially forced on David a reduction of numbers (comparable to the voluntary reduction under Gideon). This may indicate that at least part of the sin concerned misguided confidence. David was trusting more in the size of his army than in the power of God.

Both possibilities offer important lessons for us today. It is just as important for us to act on the instruction of God, but never to go beyond His word. There is no record that God commanded David not to take a census, but His silence indicated that David was not authorized to do so. David acted presumptuously by going beyond God’s command, and we do the same if we add human innovations to worship, doctrine, or the organization of the Lord’s church. In the same way, we must avoid seeing the size of a congregation, or the popularity of a message as the reason we can take confidence in religious strength. God wanted Israel to trust in Him and not in its own size and greatness. He wants the same of His spiritual Israel—the church. Whether many or few accept the truth, it is still the truth, and our confidence must rest in God and His word. 

While David sinned through presumptuous action and a failure to trust God, Hezekiah was the antithesis of this. When he learned of the threat of Assyria he looked to God and not the power of his own might. Because of his faith the Angel of the Lord killed the Assyrian army (which vastly outnumbered Israelite forces) but He did not destroy Jerusalem (2 Kings 19). In David’s sin, he was not personally punished. Instead, he along with the nation as whole was forced to remember that their strength rested in God, not in their own numbers. It is interesting that in the next generation (in spite of this reduction due to the plague), Israel grew to its largest extent in its history (cf. 1 Kings 4:21-24). Israel’s strength always rested in God. The same remains true for Christ’s church in today.

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 24, Issue 34 (August 21, 2022)

September 2019
https://truthmagazine.com/kindle/2019/2019-09-sep/06_QnA.htm
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Some Things Christ Does Not Know

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on this following link while on the Internet: 

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Some_Things_Christ_Does_Not_Know.mp4

——————

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Congregational Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)

 

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) Theme: Fiery Chariots (Jon W. Quinn)
2) Pointed Perceptions (Perry Hurst)
3)  Peace (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
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Theme: Fiery Chariots

Jon W. Quinn

Synopsis: Elisha’s declaration, “Do not fear, for those who are with us are more than those who are with them,” and the subsequent unveiling of the heavenly hosts provides reassurance in troubled times.
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The Enigma machine was an encryption device used by the Germans in World War II to transmit coded messages. It allowed billions of ways to encode a message, making it incredibly difficult for the Allies to crack German codes. Allied researchers were able to exploit some weaknesses in the system and gained access to some German codebooks. From these, they were able to design their own device called the “Bombe machine” which helped to crack even the most challenging versions of the Enigma. Some historians say this was the single most important victory by the Allies. By using this breakthrough, they were able to prepare for and counter many attacks, and find weaknesses in the German defenses. They would, however, allow some German attacks to be carried out so the enemy would not be suspicious that their system had been compromised. It is very useful to know the enemy’s plans!

Ben-hadad was king of Syria and an enemy of Israel. His army was powerful as he led his warriors into Israel to raid and conquer. The account is found in 2 Kings 6:8-18. The time would come when, because of their unfaithfulness, God would permit Assyria to conquer Israel. Yet, the Lord was not finished sending prophets to Israel urging them to repent. God is patient.

Ben-hadad planned his strategies with his generals in top secret. They would encamp in a certain place and do battle. Unfortunately for the Syrians, these plans always failed. Israel’s armies were always someplace else. Enraged because ambush after ambush had failed, Ben-hadad questioned his servants, “Will you tell me which one of us is for the king of Israel?” (v. 11). He was certain that there was a spy in their midst. The enemy just had too much knowledge of the Syrians’ secret plans!

However, there was no spy among them, and of course, there was no code-breaking device either. One of the servants responded, “No, my lord, O king; but Elisha, the prophet who is in Israel, tells the king of Israel the words you speak in your bedroom” (v. 12). Espionage can be tricky business, but there is no better spy than a prophet of God. Even Ben-hadad’s bedroom is “bugged” as the Holy Spirit revealed to Elisha every detail of every plan.

Ben-Hadad decided that in order to win the victory, he must get rid of Israel’s eyes and ears. He must capture Elisha. “So he said, ‘Go and see where he is, that I may send and take him.’ And it was told him, saying, ‘Behold, he is in Dothan'” (2 Kings 6:13).

Easier Said Than Done!

Ben-hadad sent an army of horses and chariots to surround the city of Dothan in the night. There would be no escape for Elisha! Elisha’s servant rose early in the morning and went out of the house. He beheld the warriors of Syria completely surrounding the city. The servant returned to Elisha and said, “Alas, my master! What shall we do?” Elisha did not seem too worried. I suppose it is always important to keep a cool head in such situations. Elisha assured his servant, “Do not fear, for those who are with us are more than those who are with them” (2 Kings 6:16). Who was Elisha talking about? Who was with them?

Then Elisha prayed and said, “O Lord, I pray, open his eyes that he may see.” And the Lord opened the servant’s eyes, and he saw; and behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha (2 Kings 6:17). All around them, but beyond the capabilities of the five human physical senses, was all the protection necessary. Elisha would be no prisoner that day. The would-be captors became the captives!

Do You Sometimes Feel as If You are Surrounded by the Enemy?

We live in a fallen world. There is evil on every side. There is sickness and temptation and sorrow. Tragedy and loss sometimes strike. We experience problems with personal relationships, economic difficulties, and personal failure. Finally, death comes to all. In the words of Elisha’s servant, “What shall we do?” The right answer is found in faith.

Today, the enemy commander is Satan. The spears and darts come in the form of temptations and trials. He means to take us captive. Paul mentions some who had already been captured, and their need to be taught and encouraged to repent; “and they may come to their senses and escape from the snare of the devil, having been held captive by him to do His will” (2 Tim. 2:26).

When the child of God, aware of God’s presence in his life, faces down the adversary, his light shines the brightest (1 Pet. 4:14-16; 2:12). God is glorified and the disciple is strengthened. There is assurance even in the midst of evil. We need to dedicate ourselves to making the most of every situation, knowing that our Lord will give the victory (Eph. 5:15-17; Phil. 1:12-13). It’s time to don your armor (Eph. 6:10-12)!

God is Greater Than Any Enemy You Will Ever Face

Notice the response of Elisha to the “threat.” The servant saw the odds as two versus a thousand, but he forgot God in his equation. We must not do the same. We are body and spirit. There is a physical realm, and there is a spiritual realm. There is more to a person than the sum of his physical parts (Matt. 10:28). There is more to our universe than just the things we can see with our eyes (2 Cor. 10:3-5, 7; 4:16-18).

In Elisha’s day, unseen by the physical senses was the providence of God. God is present in every situation where His children encounter the enemy. Not everyone can see it, but God is there to support, protect and encourage. He will handle the situation if we will handle our faith. This does not mean an absence of suffering or even death, but it does mean absolute victory. God’s people might die, but they will live again. Every tear shall be wiped away. “You are from God, little children, and have overcome them; because greater is He who is in you than he who is in the world” (1 John 4:4).

By the way, man’s final enemy is death. Then there will be no more battles to fight and no more enemies to face. By faith, the war is won forever.

God Will Deliver You

The invaders sent from Ben-hadad were struck blind and led into the midst of Israel, where their sight was restored. Elisha instructed the king of Israel to feed them and send them home. This was done, and Ben-hadad became so terrified by the experience that he stopped sending his marauding bands into Israel.

The Importance of Prayer

Prayer was a key to Elisha’s success (2 Kings 6:17). There is more going on than just the things we see. There are chariots of fire doing battle in the spiritual realm. Communication with God is always appropriate (Rev. 6:9-11; Phil. 4:6-7)!

The Importance of Faith

Faith was also key. We have not seen the throne of God, but we believe that He reigns and is in control. Having taken our situation to God in prayer, we must maintain confidence in Him. Recall how Stephen, just before his death, was permitted to view the realm where Christ reigns (Acts 7:56). We, too, shall join the Lord there one day (cf. Rom. 10:17; Heb. 11:1). Take courage, brethren! “For those who are with us are more than those who are with them.”

Author Bio: Jon has worked with the Bradley church of Christ in Bradley, IL for thirty years. He and his wife, Barbara, have three children. The church website is bradleychurchofchrist.com. He can be reached at jwquinn@sbcglobal.net.

— Via Truth Magazine, No. 9, Volume 63, September, 2019
https://truthmagazine.com/kindle/2019/2019-09-sep/08_Monthly_Theme_Lesson_02.htm
——————–

-2-

Pointed Perceptions

Perry Hurst

The Psalmist said, “This is the day which the Lord has made, Let us rejoice and be glad in it” (Ps. 118:24). This passage causes us to reflect upon an attitude that we ought to have each day of our lives! But how can that be? How can we have such a positive feeling of joy each day? We have trials, sorrows, temptations, heartaches, pains, disappointments, needs, etc. Joy in the midst of all these struggles? Some may think it to be impossible, yet we find the key to such a positive outlook in 2 Cor. 4:17-18: “For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporal, but the things which are not seen are eternal.”

— via The Beacon, 6/12/22
——————–

-3-

Peace

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on this following link: 

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Peace_082122.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Congregational Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


 



The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) MEDITATIONS: Josiah: “There Was No King Like Him” (Kyle Pope)
2) The World’s Oldest Lie (Heath Rogers)
3) The High Cost of Sin (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

MEDITATIONS:
Josiah: “There Was No King Like Him”

Kyle Pope

Synopsis: Josiah, the final faithful king of Judah, was a man of great courage and dedication to God’s word. Kyle reminds us that his life teaches us powerful lessons about what it truly means to serve God.

———————————————-

In most instances in First and Second Kings, David is the king who is the model of service to God (1 Kings 15:3; 15:11; 2 Kings 14:3; 16:2; 18:3). There is one king, however, who surpasses even David. Concerning Josiah, 2 Kings 23:25 tells us, “Now before him there was no king like him, who turned to the Lord with all his heart, with all his soul, and with all his might, according to all the Law of Moses; nor after him did any arise like him” (NKJV).

The story of Josiah’s life begins nearly three hundred years before his birth. When the kingdoms of Israel and Judah were divided, the wicked king, Jeroboam, established the idolatrous worship of gold calves at Dan and Bethel. 1 Kings 13:1-34 tells us about a prophet who confronted Jeroboam at Bethel as he stood by an altar he had built to burn incense. The prophet cried out: “O altar, altar! Thus says the Lord: ‘Behold, a child, Josiah by name, shall be born to the house of David; and on you he shall sacrifice the priests of the high places who burn incense on you, and men’s bones shall be burned on you'” (1 Kings 13:2).

When Josiah was born years later, the kingdom he would inherit differed little from the wickedness of Jeroboam’s day. The evil reigns of his father, Amon, and his grandfather, Manasseh, reversed all the righteous reforms of his noble great-grandfather, Hezekiah (see 2 Kings 21). Josiah began to reign at the age of eight after his father’s servants had killed him in his own house (2 Chron. 33:24). When the people of the land rose up and executed the conspirators, Josiah was placed upon the throne (2 Kings 21:24).

While we might expect that Josiah would continue in the wickedness of his fathers, 2 Chronicles 34:3 tells us that in the eighth year of his reign, at the age of sixteen, “he began to seek the God of his father David.” This spiritual quest would take this young man to heights he surely never imagined. Four years later he began to purge Judah of idolatry, destroying the altars to Baal, pulverizing the molded, carved, and wooden images, and scattering the dust on the graves of those who had worshipped at their altars (2 Chron. 34:4).

Second Chronicles makes it clear that Josiah began his first efforts to purge Israel of idolatry with a relatively naïve understanding of what it meant to “seek the God of his father David.” It was not until six years later, in the eighteenth year of his reign that an event occurred that changed Josiah forever (2 Chron. 34:8). After his initial purge, he commissioned a major restoration of the temple. In the course of this effort, the High Priest, Hilkiah, found “the book of the Law of the Lord [given] by Moses” (2 Chron. 34:14). A scribe named Shaphan read the book to the king, and as Josiah heard God’s instructions, his heart was broken as he recognized how his nation and his fathers had sinned against God. Josiah tore his clothes in remorse and commanded that inquiry be made to the Lord, “because our fathers have not obeyed the words of this book to do according to all that is written concerning us” (2 Kings 22:13). The Lord answered Josiah’s inquiry through a prophetess named Huldah, who revealed that the Lord planned to destroy Judah and Jerusalem because of the wickedness of the nation (2 Kings 22:16-17; 2 Chron. 34:24-25). Yet, the Lord promised Josiah not to bring destruction during his reign, “because your heart was tender, and you humbled yourself before God when you heard His words” (2 Chron. 34:27).

After hearing this, Josiah called the people to pledge to follow God’s word (2 Kings 23:1-3). He then proceeded further to remove idolatry. This involved destroying idols and booths for ritual homosexual prostitution that were actually located within the temple (2 Kings 23:4-7). He burned the bones of dead idolatrous priests and scattered their ashes over former places of idolatry (2 Chron. 34:4,5). This defiled these places, preventing any future idolatry in them. One such place was the valley outside of Jerusalem called “the valley of the Son of Hinnom.” Josiah’s grandfather, Manasseh, had sacrificed his own children there, in addition to practicing witchcraft and sorcery (2 Chron. 33:6). Josiah “defiled” the place in the valley called Topheth, where sacrifices were made to Molech (2 Kings 23:10). In fulfillment of the prophecy concerning him, he destroyed the altar built by Jeroboam and burned the bones of its priests over it (2 Kings 23:15,16).

Josiah also moved forward constructively to lead the people toward a restoration of true worship. He led the people to observe the Passover in such a way as “had never been held since the days of the judges who judged Israel, nor in all the days of the kings of Israel and the kings of Judah” (2 Kings 23:22). Josiah reigned thirteen years after the finding of the book of the law (2 Kings 22:1). He died after being mortally wounded, opposing Pharaoh Neco at Megiddo, and was lamented by all the people and the prophet, Jeremiah (2 Chron. 35:20-27).

Josiah lived only thirty-nine years, but his short life teaches us that a difficult childhood does not mean that someone cannot choose to do right. It shows us that seeking God demands a willingness to turn from the errors (sometimes) of our own family. Finally, it teaches us that no matter how long the truth is forsaken, it is still the truth.

— Via Truth Magazine, April 2018, No. 4, Volume 62, https://truthmagazine.com/kindle/2018/2018-04-apr/02_Meditations.htm
——————–

-2-

The World’s Oldest Lie

Heath Rogers

When Satan appeared to Eve in the garden, he began to put doubts in her head regarding the command of God. He asked if God had said “You shall not eat of every tree of the garden.” Eve responded that she and her husband could eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, adding that God had said, “You shall not eat it, nor shall you touch it, lest you die.” Satan responded, “You will not surely die” (Gen. 3:1-4).

The book of Revelation says that Satan “deceives the whole world” (12:9). Jesus told the unbelieving Jews, “You are of your father the devil, and the desires of your father you want to do. He was a murderer from the beginning, and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he speaks a lie, he speaks from his own resources, for he is a liar and the father of it” (John 8:44). In “the beginning” Satan attempted to murder the human race by tempting Eve with a lie. He lied about the penalty or consequence of sin. Eve may not have understood what death was, but she certainly understood that it was the penalty for eating the fruit of the tree in the midst of the garden. Satan got her to believe that there really wasn’t a consequence for sin.

Satan’s lie continued, calling God’s character into question: “For God knows that in the day you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil” (Gen. 3:5). He got Eve to believe that eating the fruit would actually benefit her, and that God was holding her back from having or enjoying something that she had a right to experience.

The oldest lie in the world is still being told today. Every day we are given the impression that there is no penalty for violating God’s commands. Sinners go unpunished. We are told that life is ours to enjoy. Live it up. You only go around once. You deserve a break today. Young people are “expected” to experiment and sow their wild oats. Fornicators, homosexuals, pornographers, gamblers, drinkers, liars, etc., all follow their lusts while claiming “I’m not hurting anybody.” We see it happen around us so much that we may be tempted to believe it ourselves.

However, the Bible clearly warns us about the consequences of sin. Paul said that the wages of sin is death (Rom. 6:23). Solomon wrote that the way of the transgressor is hard (Prov. 13:15). Moses warned “be sure your sin will find you out” (Num. 32:23). Jesus spoke of the binding nature of sin when He said “Most assuredly, I say to you, whoever commits sin is a slave of sin” (8:34).

Worldly sinners are not the only ones who lie regarding the consequences of sin. The Calvinist lies about the penalty of sin when he insists that the sins committed by a child of God cannot condemn his soul. However, the Bible says that a child of God has to repent, confess, and pray in order to receive the forgiveness of his sins (Acts 8:22; 1 John 1:9). The Hebrew Christians were warned, “For if we sin willfully after we have received the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins, but a certain fearful expectation of judgment, and fiery indignation which will devour the adversaries” (Heb. 10:26-27).

“You will not surely die.” The oldest lie in the world, still alive and well today. We know better. Let us strive to live holy lives before the Judge of all the earth.

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, May 2013
——————–

Jude 1:4

“For certain individuals whose condemnation was written about long ago have secretly slipped in among you.  They are ungodly people, who pervert the grace of our God into a license for immorality and deny Jesus Christ our only Sovereign and Lord” (NIV, emphasis mine, tte).
——————–

-3-

The High Cost of Sin

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on this following link while on the Internet: 

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/High_Cost_of_Sin.mp4

——————–  

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent
 of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith
 in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Congregational Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) To Timothy: How To Live By Faith In Any Century, 1 Timothy 6:1-20 (Jon W. Quinn))
2) Pointed Perceptions (Perry Hurst)
3) Our Responsibility Toward One Another (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

To Timothy: How To Live By Faith In Any Century
1 Timothy 6:1-20

Jon W. Quinn

It is remarkable how the teachings of the Bible seem so applicable to life’s situations in the twentieth century. There is a reason for that; it addresses unchanging human needs and longings. In our constantly changing world there are some things that remain the same. Spiritual, moral, emotional problems which exist today are the same as existed in the first century. The answers are the same as well.

For the Christian, there are several things to do to insure our walk by faith will be successful. Paul writes to Timothy about some of these things encouraging him to pass the word along to others as he fulfills his role as a preacher. Notice the sixth chapter of first Timothy for some important advice from Jesus to His people as given through His apostle.

Concern for God’s Reputation

“Let all who are under the yoke as slaves regard their own masters as worthy of all honor so that the name of God and our doctrine may not be spoken against” (1 Timothy 6:1).

Our society has done away with the institution of slavery, and for that we are thankful. But do not think that this admonition is outdated; it is not. There is still a social order. There are still those in authority. We can still damage our God’s name and our doctrine by being belligerent, rebellious or disorderly.

“For such is the will of God, that by doing right you may silence the ignorance of foolish men” (I Peter 2:15).

There are many ways in which we can act so that we bring reproach upon God and the teachings of the New Testament. To be lazy or dishonest; to be arrogant or selfish; to be weak-willed or hypocritical would allow enemies of God to charge that belief in God and living by His word causes such behavior. Of course, it is a false charge, but one that will be made just the same. Do not allow your undisciplined actions be the excuse for such talk.

Concern for Sound Doctrine

“If anyone advocates a different doctrine, and does not agree with sound words, those of our Lord Jesus Christ, and with the doctrine conforming to godliness, he is conceited and understands nothing…” (1 Timothy 6:3-4a).

Many will tell you that doctrine is not very important and a person’s doctrinal stance should make very little difference. But the context of this verse proves that God looks at the matter of doctrinal purity as being very important. One who has a casual attitude toward doctrine has a much different attitude than what the New Testament teaches us to have. The context suggests that strife and division result from those who advocate different doctrines; not from those who insist that doctrinal purity be maintained. It is not that we should insist on having everything just our way; we definitely should not. But we must insist on having everything God’s way. His word must be our only standard.

Concern for Proper Values

“But godliness actually is a means of great gain, when accompanied by contentment…for the love of money is the root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith, and pierced themselves with many a pang” (1 Timothy 6:6,10).

When a person’s values are warped, then his priorities will also be. Many are obsessed with money and because of that have cheated others, hurt their loved ones and emptied their lives of any true meaning. It is easy for a rich person to surround himself with people, but difficult to know who his true friends are. A man or woman who has made themselves rich but destroyed their relationship with God and family is certainly not to be envied. Even the rich must resign themselves to take no more out of this world than what they brought into it. There is something better than riches… there is “the treasure of a good foundation for the future, so they may take hold of that which is life indeed” (1 Timothy 6:19).
“…for where your treasure is, there will your heart be also” (Matthew 6:21).

Concern for Winning the Fight

“Fight the good fight of faith; take hold of the eternal life to which you were called, and you made the good confession in the presence of many witnesses” (1 Timothy 6:12).

Discipleship is not for the weak of character. There are things which must be avoided and principles for which to stand. “Pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance and gentleness.”

Such commitment calls for strength and courage. It means having to stand for what is right even when in the minority. Paul reminds Timothy of how Jesus stood before Pilate and spoke the truth. He would not hide what He was nor what He stood for. He handled the truth with dignity and was unashamed of His position, though in bonds and being terribly mocked and ridiculed. Never has there been a better example of a hero than Jesus. Certainly disciples of Jesus will not yield their ground when they stand on the rock of truth. How sad that some members of the church have already surrendered by waving the white flag and dropping their weapons and armor. They make compromises with the world whenever the world demands it. They will not speak up in behalf of the Savior; they will not endure hardship; they will not put His kingdom first. How unlike our Jesus they are.

“Put on the full armor of God, that you may be able to stand firm against the schemes of the devil” (Ephesians 6:11).

Concern for Honoring Christ

“He who is the blessed and only Sovereign, the King of kings and Lord of lords; who alone possesses immortality and dwells in unapproachable light; whom no man has seen or can see. To Him be honor and eternal dominion! Amen” (1 Timothy 6:15b-16).

Jesus deserves our complete loyalty. He deserves our love and adoration. What He has done for us is far beyond what we deserve. If we have done everything for Him that it is possible for us to do we have still done far less than He deserves.

One day He shall return. We shall then see Him in His glorified state. But we must not wait until then to glorify Him. It is now the time to bow our knees before the King. It is now the time to make sure that all know who it is that we honor. It is now the time to sing His praises; proclaim His word; give thanksgiving in His name and do His work. On that final day at the conclusion of this age, when this mortality has put on immortality and we behold Him in the light which for now is unapproachable, we shall know with certainty that all our honor of Him in this life has been well placed!

Concern for Our Stewardship

“…guard that which has been entrusted to you…” (1 Timothy 6:20).

We have been entrusted with the gospel of Christ. As His people, we need to insure that we do not squander our opportunities to invest it. The gospel is God’s power to save, but there must be those willing to take the gospel to others. In the New Testament times, the early church was extremely successful at this, in part because they realized that it was not only the preacher’s responsibility to take the gospel to others, but each and every Christian. How does God look upon those who would know His will but not share it with others? He will hold us accountable for what we do with the things which He has entrusted to us.

— Via Expository Files 1.5; May 1994
——————–

“not lagging behind in diligence, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord”

Romans 12:11, NASB
——————–

-2-

Pointed Perceptions

Perry Hurst

The Psalmist said, “This is the day which the Lord has made, Let us rejoice and be glad in it” (Psalm 118:24). This passage causes us to reflect upon an attitude that we ought to have each day of our lives! But how can that be? How can we have such a positive feeling of joy each day? We have trials, sorrows, temptations, heartaches, pains, disappointments, needs, etc. Joy in the midst of all these struggles? Some may think it to be impossible, yet we find the key to such a positive outlook in 2 Corinthians 4:17-18: “For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporal, but the things which are not seen are eternal.”

— Via The Beacon, June 12, 2022
——————–

-3-

Our Responsibility Toward One Another

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Serving_Others_080722.mp4


——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized
 in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) This Man You Nailed to a Cross (Chris Simmons)
2) There is no Substitute for God (Jon W. Quinn)
——————–

-1-

This Man You Nailed to a Cross

Chris Simmons

Following Christ’s ascension to the right hand of God’s throne, Peter, having received the Holy Spirit, which Christ had promised His apostles, took his stand with the other eleven and responded to the accusation that they were drunk because they were speaking in tongues. In Acts 2:15, Peter pointed out that devout Jews such as the apostles would not be so intoxicated at the third hour of the day, which is the hour of prayer (9 a.m. as we know it). Then, under the Holy Spirit’s inspiration, Peter established that they were all witnessing the fulfillment of the prophecy spoken by Joel; Peter stated, “This is that which hath been spoken through the prophet Joel” (Acts 2:16-21; Joel 2:28-32). Having defended the twelve and establishing what they were all witnessing, Peter then took the offensive and began to teach and convict the multitude. He began by teaching them about Jesus of Nazareth, convicting them of what they had done to Him, and then in contrast, establishing what God had done for Him.

In Acts 2:22, Peter began by establishing that Jesus’ works proved that He was from God. “Jesus the Nazarene, a man attested to you by God with miracles and wonders and signs.” The word attested, in the Greek, means that Jesus was demonstrated, exhibited, or accredited to be the Divine Son of God.

During His ministry, a multitude came to Jesus and asked, “What then do You do for a sign, that we may see, and believe You? What work do You perform?” (John 6:30). Just prior to that incident, in John 5, in addition to citing the witness of John the Baptist (verse 33), the Father (verse 7) and the Scriptures (verse 39), Jesus also spoke to the witness of His works when He said, “But the witness which I have is greater than that of John; for the works which the Father has given Me to accomplish, the very works that I do, bear witness of Me, that the Father has sent Me” (John 5:36). At least some recognized this about Jesus, as Nicodemus in John 3:2 said, “Rabbi, we know that You have come from God as a teacher; for no one can do these signs that You do unless God is with him.”

Not only did Peter point out Jesus’ works, which attested to His Divine status, but in Acts 2:22, he also pointed out that they were “performed … in your midst, just as you yourselves know.” There was no need for Peter to argue his point regarding the miracles, and wonders, and signs. Jesus had not performed His works in secret. The fact that He performed them was irrefutable. They could not be denied. The only thing His enemies could do was attempt to ascribe them to the power of the “ruler of the demons” (Matthew 12:24). Jesus proved that argument to be fallacious when He stated, “If Satan casts out Satan, he is divided against himself; how then shall his kingdom stand?” (verses 25-29).

Likewise irrefutable were the mighty works performed by Jesus’ apostles. The Jewish council noted this fact when, regarding the healing of the lame man that had taken place in Acts chapter 3, they said, “What shall we do with these men? For the fact that a noteworthy miracle has taken place through them is apparent to all who live in Jerusalem, and we cannot deny it”  (Acts 4:16).

Next, in Acts 2, Peter taught that Jesus’ deliverance to “godless men” was not because of Divine inability to rescue Him or establish Him as a physical King; rather, it was part of God’s eternal plan. “This Man (was) delivered up by the predetermined plan and foreknowledge of God” (Acts 2:23). Jesus’ crucifixion was not an accident. It was part of God’s “predetermined plan and foreknowledge.”

  • The word “predetermined” means “what is defined, marked out, or bounded; as, to mark out or define the boundary of a field” (Barnes’ Notes, Electronic Database by Bible Soft).
  • The word “plan” carries with it the idea of one’s purpose, decree, or will.

Thus, it was God’s will or purpose, “before the foundation of the world” (Ephesians 1:3-12) to mark out or define that man’s salvation would come through Christ’s sacrifice on the cross and the blood He shed. Jesus “laid down His life” (John 10:14-18). Christ’s life was not taken from Him against His will; He offered it according to God’s will.

However, although it was God’s will for Christ to bear the sins of the world, Peter made sure the multitude understood that they were guilty of sin because of what they had done. He stated, in verse 23, regarding this Jesus of Nazareth, “You nailed (Him) to a cross by the hands of godless men and put Him to death.” Peter made it clear that all who participated, as well as those who simply shouted their encouragement and support — “crucify Him” (Mark 15:13-14) — were guilty of murdering God’s Son.

To the Jews, condemning a person to die by nailing him to a cross (crucifixion) was condemning him to die as the worst of criminals. “To the Jewish people, crucifixion represented the most disgusting form of death: ‘He who is hanged is accursed of God’ (Deuteronomy 21:23; Galatians 3:13). Yet, the Jewish Sanhedrin sought and obtained Roman authorization to have Jesus crucified (Mark 15:13-15)” (Nelson’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary).

The fact that the one who claimed to be the “King of the Jews” (Matthew 27:11) was put to death in such a horrible, demeaning way presented to many Jews a most imposing stumbling block to claiming Him as the “Lord and Christ” and accepting Him as the true Messiah. Paul summed up the crucifixion in this way, “We preach Christ crucified, to Jews a stumbling block, and to Gentiles foolishness, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God” (1 Corinthians 1:23-24).

In Acts 2:24, Peter emphatically established that the efforts of those godless men who nailed Jesus to the cross to thwart God’s predetermined plan failed because God raised Him up. We see the contrast between men’s feeble will (they put Christ to death) and God’s immutable, sovereign, and predetermined will (God raised Him up). Jesus’ resurrection is the foundation for our hope and salvation, and the culminating declaration of His Divinity and victory.

We read in 1 Corinthians 15:14-19, “And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is vain, your faith also is vain. Moreover we are even found to be false witnesses of God, because we witnessed against God that He raised Christ, whom He did not raise, if in fact the dead are not raised. For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is worthless; you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If we have hoped in Christ in this life only, we are of all men most to be pitied.”

Also, in Romans 1:1-5, we read, “Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which He promised beforehand through His prophets in the holy Scriptures, concerning His Son, who was born of a descendant of David according to the flesh, who was declared the Son of God with power by the resurrection from the dead, according to the Spirit of holiness, Jesus Christ our Lord.”

In Acts 2:36, Peter concluded his sermon regarding this Jesus whom they had nailed to a cross, “Therefore let all the house of Israel know for certain that God has made Him both Lord and Christ – this Jesus whom you crucified.” Those Jews then asked, What shall we do?  We, too, must give attention to the question, “What shall we do with the crucified Christ?”

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, March 2009
——————–

2 Corinthians 5:14-15

“For the love of Christ controls us, having concluded this, that one died for all, therefore all died; and He died for all, so that they who live might no longer live for themselves, but for Him who died and rose again on their behalf.”

— NASB

——————–

-2-

There is no Substitute for God

Jon W. Quinn

As the deer pants for the water brooks, So my soul pants for You, O God. My soul thirsts for God, for the living God; When shall I come and appear before God? (Psalm 42:1-2).

I read the following statement some time ago. I thought about it. “God may well be taken as a substitute for everything; but nothing can be taken as a substitute for God.”

That’s true. It took me a bit to see the truth in it, but finally the light came on.

With God there is always hope for the faithful. There is always prospect and assurance and peace. There is confidence that, at last, all will be well… more than well… perfect. We can suffer the loss of anything, even life itself, and still have this assurance. As long as we have God, then ultimately all will become as it ought to be because God is more powerful than death. That is why nothing can be a substitute for God. Nothing else does that.

But, on the other hand, without God we are destined to lose everything worthwhile and there is no hope of even a glimmer of good. This is why we ought not spend our lives chasing after futile things and neglect God. Nothing can take the place of God. Not really. We can put other things in God’s place, but they will fail to do what God does. Nothing can take His place in our lives.

The Lord told His people, “You must not turn aside, for then you would go after futile things which cannot profit or deliver, because they are futile” (1 Samuel 12:21).

Jesus once asked His apostles if they were giving up and going away. The answer came back, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have words of eternal life” (John 6:68).

Jesus identifies Himself as “The Bread of Life” because He sustains us through our deepest needs. Just as candy can spoil our appetite and cause us to pass up needed nourishment, the love of things of the world can rob us of our hunger for righteousness and leave us growing ever sicker and ultimately dying a spiritual death. Things of this creation can never do for us what God can do. There is no substitute. People need to stop looking for one.

— Via the Facebook site for the Bradley church of Christ, June 22, 2022
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Love — The More Excellent Way (Heath Rogers)
2) Leave the Solution to God (Frank Himmel)
3) Thankful to God for the Great Debt He Paid! (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Love — The More Excellent Way

Heath Rogers

First Corinthians thirteen is a favorite chapter of the Bible to many people. Perhaps its appeal lies in the fact that, in just a few verses, the Holy Spirit is able to do what no poet, professor, or philosopher has been able to do throughout all of human history — give man an accurate and complete understanding of what it means to love.

Verses 4-7 provide a list of fifteen characteristics of love. As one progresses through this list, he gains a better understanding of love and can come to understand why it is the greatest gift that man can possess. Unless otherwise noted, quotations are from the New King James version.

Love suffers long: This characteristic emphasizes patience with others. It is translated from the Greek word makrothumeo. This is actually a compound word: makros meaning “long,” and thumos which means “temper.” Thus, the person who is longsuffering is literally the individual who has a long-burning fuse. It describes the man who has the power to retaliate when he is wronged, but has the presence of mind and strength of character to hold his anger in check.

and is kind: The term in the original language literally means to show oneself “useful”; the carrying out of useful deeds to help others. Love is considerate and always provides what is of value or worth to others.

Kindness is the perfect compliment to longsuffering. While longsuffering is willing to take anything from anyone, kindness is willing to give anything to meet the needs of others.

love does not envy: The New American Standard renders this characteristic as “not jealous.” This phrase is translated from a Greek word meaning “to be heated or to boil.” This term can have a positive meaning, “to desire earnestly,” and a negative meaning, “to envy another.” Here, it is used in the negative sense. Love does not cause one to “boil” over the success or advantages of another.

love does not parade itself, is not puffed up: Various versions have translated this phrase differently. For instance, the King James reads “charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up,” while the New American Standard reads “love does not brag and is not arrogant” (NASV).

The first of these expressions represents the speech or action that is produced by pride, while the second represents the attitude of pride itself. The root word for the first expression in the Greek means “wind bag,” while the root for the second means “bellows.” Bragging is fed by an arrogant attitude. Love has neither quality. Love is humble, seeking to perform its work without desire for recognition or reward.

does not behave rudely: This phrase is also rendered differently by various translations: “doth not behave itself unseemly” (KJV), “does not act unbecomingly” (NASV). William Barclay translates the phrase as “Love does not behave gracelessly.”

The phrase is translated from the Greek word aschemoneo, which literally means to go against the scheme. It refers to the act of going against what is accepted as the norm, to “stick out” or to be inappropriate. An arrogant man, in an effort to promote himself, will forget to treat others with respect and consideration. However, love is mannerly in that it never conducts itself in a way that is contrary to accepted standards of decency.

does not seek its own: This characteristic describes the person who is more concerned with his duties than his rights. Love does not make “self” the center of the universe. Jesus manifested this characteristic of love to the world in that He “did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many” (Matt. 20:28).

is not provoked: This characteristic is translated from the Greek work paroxuno which means to spur on, to stimulate, or to stir to anger. This describes the person who has control over his temper. Love does not go around with a chip on its shoulder looking for reasons to become upset or irritated at personal offences.

thinks no evil: The New American Standard renders this phrase as “does not take into account a wrong suffered.” This is translated from the Greek word logizomai. This was a bookkeeping term that was used for the act of entering a debt on a ledger so that it would not be forgotten. Love does not keep a running account of offenses against itself with a view towards revenge. With a less technical understanding, love does not dwell upon personal offenses or evil deeds that it has been called upon to endure. Love does not harbor bitterness and resentment. It knows how to forget.

does not rejoice in iniquity: Many people rejoice in sin, either their own sin or the sins of others (Rom. 1:32). Love is active goodwill towards others; sin brings harm and loss to others. As such, the two are opposed to each other. Love is free from the malice that takes pleasure in sin and finds satisfaction in discussing the sins of others.

but rejoices in the truth: Love has the courage to face the truth and to rejoice when the cause of truth, justice, and righteousness is upheld. Love takes pleasure in the truth being taught, defended, and lived (2 John 4; 3 John 3-4).

bears all things: In one sense, love has the strength to bear whatever afflictions or persecutions may personally come upon an individual. However, the meaning of this term in the original language indicates that this quality is shown outwardly as opposed to inwardly. The Greek word means “to protect or preserve by covering.” Love will do everything it can to cover the sin and shame of the person who is the object of its affection. “And above all things have fervent love for one another, for ‘love will cover a multitude of sins'” (1 Peter 4:8). Love does not ignore sin. It will warn, rebuke, and chasten as needed, but its first impulse will be to protect the object of love.

believes all things: Love is not gullible or naive, but neither is it cynical. Love’s first impulse is to give others the benefit of the doubt, believing in them and expecting the best from them.

hopes all things: When things do look bad, love hopes for the best. Instead of putting the worst interpretation on another’s actions or motives, love compels us to put the best interpretation upon them.

endures all things: Even when it has been proven wrong, love does not give up. It stands up and continues onward against all odds.

The New International Version renders verse seven as “It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” These four statements form a progression. Love bears or protects the one who it believes in. When the evidence suggests otherwise, love will continue to hope for the best. Even if love is brought to the point of personal injury, it will continue to endure.

Love never fails: This phrase is found at the beginning of verse eight, which begins another section in chapter thirteen. However, I personally like to join it to the fifteen characteristic found in verses 4-7. Love is the greatest gift because it is permanent. It will never fail.

This great chapter can be studied for a lifetime and yet it will never cease to challenge those who desire to be like their Master. May we turn our attention to it more often and take the time to consider the standard that it sets for our lives. “Jesus said to him, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’” (Matt. 22:37-39).

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, March 2012
——————–

-2-

Leave the Solution to God

Frank Himmel

Paul observed that we do not know how to pray as we should (Romans 8:26). That being true, we can learn a valuable lesson from the apostles.

When Peter healed a lame man at the temple, it provided occasion for the second recorded gospel sermon (Acts 3). That sermon ended when the temple guards arrived to arrest Peter and John. A night in jail was followed by a day in court. But filled with the Holy Spirit, the accused became the prosecutors. Peter charged the court with having crucified Jesus, and in so doing rejecting the very cornerstone of God’s building. He added that Jesus is the only means of salvation.

The judges were taken aback. They marveled at Peter and John’s boldness. They doubtless were tempted to respond severely, but the presence in court of the man who had been healed and public interest in the case left them few options. The court decided on a “cease and desist” order: the apostles were not to speak at all in the name of Jesus. After further threatening, they were released.

Peter and John went to their brethren. Together they prayed about the situation (Acts 4:24-30). The prayer first addressed God the creator, who has all power. It then recognized His foreknowledge and rule. When this same court, along with Herod and Pilate, had done their worst—when they crucified Jesus—they had done nothing more than what God’s hand and purpose predestined to occur.

Now it was time for the apostles’ request. “And now, Lord, take note of their threats, and grant that Your bond-servants may speak Your word with all confidence” (v. 29). Rather than telling God what to do about the problem, they simply prayed that He would take note of it. They left it to Him as to how best to deal with it. And they asked for strength.

One of the benefits of praying to an all-wise God is knowing that He will do what is best. We don’t need to tell Him how to solve our problems. Just bring them before Him and pray for strength. Then leave His throne, confident that He will do what is best.

— Via Pathlights, January 2, 2022
——————–

-3-

Thankful to God for the Great Debt He Paid!

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Indebted_072422.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe
 in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classesand 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Abounding Through Many Thanksgivings to God (R.J. Evans)
2) The Weightier Matters (Ethan R. Longhenry)
3) The Great Value of Hope (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Abounding Through Many Thanksgivings to God

R.J. Evans

We are so fortunate to live in a country that realizes the need to set aside a special day of “Thanksgiving.” Our nation celebrates this holiday on the fourth Thursday in November — this coming Thursday. However, as Christians, every day should be a day of “thanksgiving” because we have innumerable blessings that come from God each day of our lives.

The Apostle Paul gave much encouragement to the Corinthians concerning the matter of their giving to the needy saints in Jerusalem. He used the churches of Macedonia as an example of some who gave with joy, liberality, willingness, and beyond their ability — despite the fact they were in deep poverty (II Corinthians 8:1-7). After instructing them to give purposefully and cheerfully (II Corinthians 9:7), he went on to assure them that “For the administration of this service not only supplies the needs of the saints, but also is abounding through many thanksgivings to God” (II Corinthians 9:12). Take note of the last phrase of this text where he said, “abounding through many thanksgivings to God.”

In order to truly receive God’s bountiful blessings, we must be thankful to God. The matter of giving thanks unto God should come first and foremost in everything we receive. The Apostle Paul told the Thessalonians “in everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ for you” (I Thessalonians 5:18).

Paul instructed the Philippians to “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God” (Philippians 4:6). The more we are thankful, the greater the abundance of the blessings that will be received.

The parable of the prodigal (wasteful) son demonstrates an attitude of ingratitude. He desired to get all that was his, get as far away from his family as he could, and then go out and enjoy himself in “prodigal living.” However, it became his road to disaster. Finally, while in the pigpen, when he came to himself, he became thankful and appreciative for what he had back home, and determined with all his heart to go back with the intention of simply becoming one of his father’s hired servants. We know the joyous ending of this return to his loving father (Luke 15:11-24). This story is a good illustration of how prosperity and wastefulness can produce ingratitude — a failure to be thankful and recognize God as the source of all blessings. See the warnings against this kind of failure in Deuteronomy 6:10-12 and I Timothy 6:6-10, 17-19.

Thankfulness was an attribute of Jesus while here on earth. When He prayed to His Father, He would thank Him for a number of blessings. Before He fed the multitudes, He gave thanks for the food. “Then He commanded the multitudes to sit down on the grass. And He took the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, He blessed and broke and gave the loaves to the disciples; and the disciples gave to the multitudes” (Matthew 14:19); “And He took the seven loaves and the fish and gave thanks, broke them and gave them to His disciples; and the disciples gave to the multitude” (15:36).

When he raised Lazarus from the dead, He thanked His Father for hearing His prayer: “Father, I thank You that You have heard Me. And I know that You always hear Me, but because of the people who are standing by I said this, that they may believe that You sent Me” (John 11:41-42).

Before He gave His disciples the bread and the cup in the memorial of His death (the Lord’s Supper), He gave thanks for the bread and for the cup (Matthew 26:26; Mark 14:22; Luke 22:19-20; I Corinthians 11:24-25).

Being thankful is not an option in the life of a Christian if he wants to be spiritually strong — it is a must! David expressed it this way: “Surely the righteous shall give thanks in Your name; The upright shall dwell in Your presence” (Psalms 40:13).

The Apostle Paul said: “speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord, giving thanks always for all things to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 5:19-20).

The giving of thanks is the will of God in our lives. We will enjoy even greater blessings by being thankful for those we have already received. It must be so heartbreaking to God when we are ungrateful for the things that He has provided for us. This is very evident when Jesus healed the ten lepers, but only one of them came back to give thanks for what He had done for him. Jesus responded by asking — “Were there not ten cleansed? But where are the nine?” (Luke 17:11-19). We can just sense the sadness on His part when He asked these questions.

Let us genuinely practice being thankful; it will truly enrich our lives. “I will praise the name of God with a song, and magnify Him with thanksgiving” (Psalms 69:30).

– Via Articles from the La Vista church of Christ, November 25, 2020
——————–

-2-

The Weightier Matters

Ethan R. Longhenry

“Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye tithe mint and anise and cummin, and have left undone the weightier matters of the law, justice, and mercy, and faith: but these ye ought to have done, and not to have left the other undone”(Matthew 23:23).

Human beings tend to maintain a narrow focus on various matters. It is easy for some people to allow a select criteria set to guide them; they decide to view everything through a certain set of lenses.

The Pharisees and scribes were not much different. The New Testament reveals that they focused —  down to the last detail — on preserving the law of Moses and the traditions that developed around that law. Their hyper-vigilance about the law led them to overemphasize the more minor actions while neglecting those that were more significant. Because they focused on, and perfectly accomplished, the minor actions, they felt a sense of pride that led to a false sense of security and satisfaction. They behaved as though being vigilant about not working on the Sabbath, washing their hands before eating, and tithing down to the level of spices would be sufficient to merit God’s commendation.

Jesus condemned their myopia. Even if they are more quantifiable and objective, performing these minor acts of obedience is not sufficient to obtain God’s commendation. Believers must not neglect the law’s weightier matters — justice, mercy, and faith.

The scribes and Pharisees were certainly guilty of such neglect. The Pharisees in particular considered themselves morally superior to their fellow men. This is evidenced by the Pharisee’s prayer in Luke 18:11-12 and the attitudes of the Pharisees in John 9. They deemed themselves to be righteous and everyone else to be sinners, despite the fact that they had also sinned and certainly were not maintaining a Godly sense of faith, justice, or mercy. Their condemnation was just.

Nevertheless, this passage also exposes a major fault line within the thoughts of many religious people. They are adamant about performing the weightier matters of the law, concluding that since we are under grace, we need to get the big things right and allow the little things to slide. Others protest the very idea that some matters are weightier than others and stress the need to do all things as God has charged us.

The truth, as usual, is somewhere in the middle. Jesus taught that some matters are weightier than others. This means that some attitudes/actions have more significance than others. This is evident in the examples given; justice, faith, and mercy are of greater significance than tithing spices. Tithing spices benefited God and His Temple; but practicing justice, mercy, and faith benefits God, His Temple, and all men. Furthermore, faith, justice, and mercy deal with every aspect of a person — his mind, his attitude, and his actions. One cannot easily have faith or show justice and mercy while internally despising God or his brethren. Tithing should flow from a heart full of faith, but a person could tithe without having proper attitudes.

Some matters are more significant than others, but that does not mean that we can let the less significant matters slide and still be pleasing to God. Notice that Jesus did not condemn the scribes or Pharisees for tithing the spices; in fact, He said, “..but these ye ought to have done.” The problem was not that the scribes and Pharisees were tithing spices; the problem was that they were tithing spices and neglecting faith, justice, and mercy. It would be a gross perversion of this text to insinuate that if they had performed the weightier matters of the law but had not tithed the spices, Jesus would have justified them. There is no basis for such a claim.

This is not an either-or proposition. The scribes and Pharisees should have accomplished both the weightier matters of the law and the spice tithing. If we serve God as we ought to serve Him, the less weighty matters flow from the weightier. Because we are dedicated to love, humility, faith, and service — the weightier matters of the new covenant (cf. Romans 1:16-17; Romans 6:16-21; Romans 13:8-11; Ephesians 2:1-10; Philippians 2:1-11; Hebrews 11:1, 6; 1 Peter 1:22; 1 Peter 5:6-7) — we will make sure we accomplish God’s will in simple, quantifiable, and objective matters, as well as in more substantive and difficult ones. We will assemble to encourage one another (1 Corinthians 14:23; Hebrews 10:25), give as we have prospered, both to the church and to those in need (1 Corinthians 16:1-3; 2 Corinthians 8:1-9:15; Galatians 2:10; 6:10), and do other such things. We will also love our neighbors as ourselves and seek their welfare (Romans 13:8-10; Philippians 2:1-4), and offer ourselves to God as living and holy sacrifices (Romans 12:1).

Jesus’ message to the scribes and Pharisees represents a necessary warning against spiritual myopia — focusing on accomplishing certain elements of God’s purposes and neglecting others. We cannot be justified by taking care of less significant, detailed matters while neglecting those that are weightier. Likewise, we cannot be justified in thinking that if we accomplish the weightier matters of God’s will, we can ignore those that are less significant. If God commanded it, there’s value in doing it. Let us seek to accomplish the whole will of God, and not neglect any aspect of it.

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, May 2010
——————–

-3-

The Great Value of Hope

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Hope_071722.mp4

——————–

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe i
n the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Standing Tall in an Ungodly World: Jude 20-25 (Jon W. Quinn)
2) A Christian in Relation to Various Things (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Standing Tall in an Ungodly World: Jude 20-25

Jon W. Quinn

Jude, the brother of the Lord, wrote of the harsh environment in which disciples of Jesus found themselves during the final half of the first century. He appeals for them to “contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints” (JUDE 3b). This shows us that the revealing of “the faith” — that is, those teachings given by God, including the account of Jesus’ life and His precepts by which we are able to live lives of faith — was never meant to be an ongoing thing. “The faith” was “once for all delivered to the saints.” This means that the document given to the world by Jesus through His chosen ones in the first century is complete and adequate for our spiritual needs.

Jude also gives warning of the corrupting influence that false teachers were having in turning the grace of God into a license to sin (vs 4). Sounds like a much needed warning for today as well, as does the remainder of this short letter.

Jude reminds the disciples of God’s judgments in the past, and affirms that God will judge the world again. Jude also warns that the mocking of the rebellious ought not be a surprise. It was not unforeseen. “But you, beloved, ought to remember the words that were spoken beforehand by the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ, that they were saying to you, ‘In the last time there shall be mockers, following after their own ungodly lusts’“ (JUDE 17,18).

So what were these hard pressed disciples of the first century to do? How would they successfully stand in a world that so often treats them with contempt? The answer to these questions is important for us as well as them, because we live today in such an environment!

Inspired by the Holy Spirit, Jude closes his short letter by giving a brief summary about what the Christian can do to remain strong. The solution had been given previously in other Scriptures; for example, Peter had dealt with it in greater length in his second epistle (to which Jude refers in vss 17-18). Notice how Jude summarizes the Lord’s solution to dealing with these pressures:

“But you, beloved, building yourselves up on your most holy faith; praying in the Holy Spirit; keep yourselves in the love of God, waiting anxiously for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ to eternal life. And have mercy on some, who are doubting; save others, snatching them from the fire; and on some have mercy with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh. Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy, to the only God our savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory and majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen” (JUDE 20-25).

Build Yourself Up On Your Faith

“But you, beloved, building yourselves up on your most holy faith…” (JUDE 20). Success will only come through a firm reliance upon the “most holy faith.” It is genuine. It is true. It is powerful. Doctrines and traditions of men, speculations and opinions, philosophies and theories will only bring ruin.

It is our responsibility to “build” ourselves up in this faith. To accomplish this, “the most holy faith” must be known and applied. To know it and not use it will suffice nothing. Many people know the right thing to do. Far fewer are willing to do it.

Can the Lord count on you? Will you prepare yourself to stand up for Jesus? Knowing the truth brings freedom only to those who are willing to apply it (JOHN 8:31,32).

Pray in the Holy Spirit

“…praying in the Holy Spirit” (JUDE 20). It ought to be no surprise that prayer has an important role to play in “standing tall in an ungodly world.” But there is a proper way to pray as well as an improper way to pray. Our text does not just say to pray, but to “pray in the Holy Spirit.”

The Holy Spirit dwells in the Christian who is walking by faith. The evidence of this is not seen through some miraculous manifestation, but rather through the fruit of the Spirit being present in one’s life, as well as the putting away of those fleshly things contrary to the Lord’s will. After listing the fruit of the Spirit; “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control,” the Scripture says, “If we live by the Spirit, let us also walk by the Spirit” (see GALATIANS 5:16-26). So, for one to “pray in the Spirit” he must be “walking by the Spirit.”

What would one pray in such circumstances? Certainly he would echo the words of Jesus’ prayer, “Not My will, but Thy will be done.” He would ask for strength and wisdom. He would pray for those that persecute him. Such a prayer will certainly be answered!

Keep Yourself in the Love of God

“…keep yourselves in the love of God…” (JUDE 21). God, because of His love for us, has provided for our salvation. He gave His beloved Son. We are wonderfully blessed because of God’s love for us. He is our great Savior!

But while His love is unconditional; He gave His Son for the whole world without any condition at all; the blessings of His love are not unconditional. If they were, then everybody would be saved. But some are lost; Why? Because they have not or are not meeting the conditions God has arranged for receiving His blessings.

To stand tall, we must continue to abide in God’s love; that is, to continue to meet the conditions He has established by His grace to receive the benefits of that grace. This is exactly what Jesus said; “If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love; just as I have kept the Father’s commandments, and abide in His love” (JOHN 15:10; cf vss 1-9).

Wait for the Lord and Eternal Life

“…waiting anxiously for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ to eternal life” (JUDE 21). Standing tall comes easier for those who look to the final result of faith. Jesus is coming again. He will vindicate the faithful by showing their faith to have been valid. The mocking will die as it is exposed for the absolute foolishness that it really is. Those thought to be wise by the world in their rebellion against the God of heaven will regret their inexcusable obstinacies forever.

“Eternal life” is God’s future for the faithful. This term describes not only the length of existence, but also the dynamic quality of it. The Scriptures describe it as an “inheritance” which is “imperishable” (will not spoil or lose its value) and “undefiled” (pure, unpolluted) and will not “not fade away” (will not lose its luster) which is “reserved in heaven for you” (I PETER 1:4).

Seek to Save Others

“And have mercy on some, who are doubting; save others, snatching them from the fire; and on some have mercy with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh” (JUDE 22,23). They say that the more concerned you are about others, the less your own problems will seem. They are correct.

Every faithful Christian needs to be aware of this very important fact when he is being mocked and treated shamefully: As a Christian, you have much more of true value than those who mock you do! Do not ever regret the choice you made and do not ever trade away the hope you have for something so much less. Do not envy the mocker who may seem so proud and invincible. Instead, be merciful to him. He is in such great need. If he does not awake soon, the fire will get him. You will never stand taller than when you try to snatch him from the flame.

“Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy, to the only God our savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory and majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen” (JUDE 24,25).

— Via The Expository Files 3.1; January 1996

——————–

-2-

A Christian in Relation to Various Things

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/A_Christian_in_Relation_to_Various_Things.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:
1) Contender For The Faith: Jude 3 (Jon W. Quinn)
2) Shrewd Sons (Frank Himmel)
3) Be Fervent (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Contender For The Faith: Jude 3

Jon W. Quinn

If the Lord takes the time to reveal in His word that something is necessary, then do you suppose it is? Of course it is! Bible says it was needful for the following exhortation to be given and heeded by disciples of Jesus Christ: “I felt it necessary to write to you appealing that you contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints” (Jude 3b). When Jude stresses the importance of this need, then we should understand that because he is writing by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, that this is God’s appraisal of the importance of this admonition.

What Is “The Faith”?

The Lord does not admonish us to contend for “a faith” or “the faith of your choice.” The definite article “the” is used which means a specific faith is being discussed. What is it? Sometimes the word “faith” refers to our own attitude of trust, and sometimes it is used to refer to that truth into which we have placed our trust. It is in this second sense that Jude uses the term; “the faith” is God’s truth; the gospel; His word. The book of Acts tells us that “the word of God kept spreading” and “a great many of the priests were becoming obedient to the faith” (Acts 6:7). So “the faith” is something “obeyed” as well as contended for. It is identified here as “the word of God” (cf. Romans 1:5).

Also, one can be “turned away from the faith” as the false prophet Elymas tried to turn Sergius Paulus away as he heard Paul teaching “the word of God” (Acts 13:7,8). The “gospel” was preached in Derbe and the new disciples made there were encouraged to “continue in the faith” (Acts 14:21,22) which was preached to them (cf. Galatians 1:23). So, “the faith” (and there is just one; Ephesians 4:5) is the word of God.

The Faith Was “Delivered”

Jude also says “the faith” was delivered. Jesus delivered this faith to His apostles and disciples during His personal ministry upon the earth. He also promised His apostles that after His departure, He would send the Holy Spirit to allow them to remember “all” that He had taught them and to supplement His teaching with further instruction (John 14:25,26; 16:13; Acts 1:4,5). This promise was fulfilled on the first Pentecost following the Lord’s ascension (Acts 2:1-4).

The apostles, and those that received the gifts of prophecy and tongues through the laying on of the apostles’ hands (Acts 8:14-18; 2 Timothy 1:6) were God’s delivery system for “the faith.” This continued as the the first century advanced and the result has been preserved in the Bible for you and me today (1 Peter 1:22-25).

The Faith Was “Once for All” Delivered

We are also informed by Jude that this delivery was made “once for all” (NASB). The Greek word (hapax) is more definite than the KJV rendition of “once.” It means “once for all” and shows that the work was completed once for all time and all people (cf. 2 Peter 2:3). This delivery of “the faith” was not to happen once; and then again; and then again. It was to happen “once for all,” and then be completed.

This is important because many false prophets have claimed through the centuries of having additional faith revealed through them. Mohammed claimed such. So did Joseph Smith, Ellen G. White, Sun Yung Moon and others. And then there is the idea among even more “mainstream” religious leaders that they, somehow, have the authority to meet together in conclaves, synods and councils and vote on what the creeds and doctrines of their particular faith will consist. They have no such right because “the faith” has already been determined “once for all” by Jesus Himself (cf. Hebrews 1:1,2).

“Contend Earnestly” For The Faith

“Contending earnestly” for the faith simply means that we must defend it and fight for it. The battle is to win hearts and minds for the Lord. The contender for the faith is not contentious, but he does contend. He or she does not allow false teaching to go unanswered. When the mocker comes, the contender does not respond to foolishness with foolishness, allowing himself to be taken down to the mocker’s level. Rather, the response is a scripturally sound one. It is both reasonable and faithful (2 Peter 3:3-5; 1 Peter 3:15; Jude 17,18). By all means, feel free to “argue religion” but do it with love and concern, for God and for man (Ephesians 4:15). “The faith” has many enemies who will gladly speak against it. Will you speak for it?

The Reason To Contend For The Faith

There are good reasons to be a contender for the faith. Even today, many are seeking to turn the grace of God into licentiousness, as they were when Jude first wrote the words of this admonition (Jude 4). These ideas of moral relativism must be answered. Failure to defend the faith is a denial of the Lord and betrays His love for us (2 Corinthians 5:11;14-15). Does the love Jesus had for you control you so that you will respond when duty to His kingdom calls?

Jude reminds disciples that there are times when godliness will be ridiculed, but that the end result of this kind of disobedience is destruction. This is still so today. Can the Lord count on you to do this necessary thing? To “contend for the faith”?

— via Expository Files 9.10, October 2002
——————–

-2-

Shrewd Sons

Frank Himmel

Jesus once lamented that the sons of this age are shrewder in relation to their own generation than the sons of light (Luke 16:8). In other words, people of the world have more initiative toward worldly things than Christians do toward heavenly things.

Consider a man who wants to catch fish. He does not expect fish to swim up to his door and invite themselves in. He is realistic. He’ll buy ample equipment: a rod and reel (likely several), hooks, a net, a bait bucket, a stringer, all sorts of tackle and a deluxe box to keep it in, a hook remover, a cleaning knife, and anything else he thinks might be useful. He will probably borrow some money and buy a boat. He’ll read books on fishing, watch those fishing shows on TV, and might even go to fishing college (yes, there is such a thing). He’ll start keeping track of the tides. He’ll talk to other fishermen about the best spots to go.

Do you suppose he will give it all up the first time he comes home empty-handed? No way — he’ll just go out earlier the next time! No matter how busy a fisherman is, there is always time for fishing. He will ask his buddies to go with him. And when he snags a big one will he keep it a secret? You know better.

There are Christians who say they want to learn more of God’s word. To accomplish this worthwhile goal they devote a whole thirty minutes per week listening to a preacher! Why don’t they get up an hour earlier or set aside Wednesday evening for Bible Study? Evidently they don’t see much value in that. And when these same folks have no money for books, periodicals, and other study aids, and no time for daily reading, it is little wonder that the fish aren’t biting.

Are you having trouble with a certain temptation? Get help. Talk to others. Talk to God. Read His prescription. Stay away from circumstances where that urge is the greatest. You don’t have to worry about saltwater fish in a freshwater lake.

Want to convert your neighbor? Set a good example. Ask him to come to church with you. Ask him to study with you. You might begin by asking him to tell you about his beliefs. Give him some literature or subscribe to a good magazine for him. You won’t catch a thing unless you throw your hook in.

Here is a young brother who thinks he might want to serve as an elder some day. What should he do? Objectively analyze his character and work on deficiencies. Learn well the word so he can hold it faithfully. Listen to older brethren that his judgment may mature. Develop his skills as a teacher by watching, listening, and doing. Pay close attention to his family. Be hospitable. Work with people. Be careful to protect his reputation. Pray. When the time comes to cast, he’ll be ready.

Heavenly goals merit thought, careful planning, enthusiasm, hard work, and whatever sacrifice of time and money is required. “Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling” (Philippians 2:12).

— via The Beacon, April 10, 2022
——————–

-3-

Be Fervent

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on this link while online:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Fervent_070322.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Congregational Singing Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


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