Author: Tom Edwards (Page 1 of 37)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) MEDITATIONS: Josiah: “There Was No King Like Him” (Kyle Pope)
2) The World’s Oldest Lie (Heath Rogers)
3) The High Cost of Sin (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
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MEDITATIONS:
Josiah: “There Was No King Like Him”

Kyle Pope

Synopsis: Josiah, the final faithful king of Judah, was a man of great courage and dedication to God’s word. Kyle reminds us that his life teaches us powerful lessons about what it truly means to serve God.

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In most instances in First and Second Kings, David is the king who is the model of service to God (1 Kings 15:3; 15:11; 2 Kings 14:3; 16:2; 18:3). There is one king, however, who surpasses even David. Concerning Josiah, 2 Kings 23:25 tells us, “Now before him there was no king like him, who turned to the Lord with all his heart, with all his soul, and with all his might, according to all the Law of Moses; nor after him did any arise like him” (NKJV).

The story of Josiah’s life begins nearly three hundred years before his birth. When the kingdoms of Israel and Judah were divided, the wicked king, Jeroboam, established the idolatrous worship of gold calves at Dan and Bethel. 1 Kings 13:1-34 tells us about a prophet who confronted Jeroboam at Bethel as he stood by an altar he had built to burn incense. The prophet cried out: “O altar, altar! Thus says the Lord: ‘Behold, a child, Josiah by name, shall be born to the house of David; and on you he shall sacrifice the priests of the high places who burn incense on you, and men’s bones shall be burned on you'” (1 Kings 13:2).

When Josiah was born years later, the kingdom he would inherit differed little from the wickedness of Jeroboam’s day. The evil reigns of his father, Amon, and his grandfather, Manasseh, reversed all the righteous reforms of his noble great-grandfather, Hezekiah (see 2 Kings 21). Josiah began to reign at the age of eight after his father’s servants had killed him in his own house (2 Chron. 33:24). When the people of the land rose up and executed the conspirators, Josiah was placed upon the throne (2 Kings 21:24).

While we might expect that Josiah would continue in the wickedness of his fathers, 2 Chronicles 34:3 tells us that in the eighth year of his reign, at the age of sixteen, “he began to seek the God of his father David.” This spiritual quest would take this young man to heights he surely never imagined. Four years later he began to purge Judah of idolatry, destroying the altars to Baal, pulverizing the molded, carved, and wooden images, and scattering the dust on the graves of those who had worshipped at their altars (2 Chron. 34:4).

Second Chronicles makes it clear that Josiah began his first efforts to purge Israel of idolatry with a relatively naïve understanding of what it meant to “seek the God of his father David.” It was not until six years later, in the eighteenth year of his reign that an event occurred that changed Josiah forever (2 Chron. 34:8). After his initial purge, he commissioned a major restoration of the temple. In the course of this effort, the High Priest, Hilkiah, found “the book of the Law of the Lord [given] by Moses” (2 Chron. 34:14). A scribe named Shaphan read the book to the king, and as Josiah heard God’s instructions, his heart was broken as he recognized how his nation and his fathers had sinned against God. Josiah tore his clothes in remorse and commanded that inquiry be made to the Lord, “because our fathers have not obeyed the words of this book to do according to all that is written concerning us” (2 Kings 22:13). The Lord answered Josiah’s inquiry through a prophetess named Huldah, who revealed that the Lord planned to destroy Judah and Jerusalem because of the wickedness of the nation (2 Kings 22:16-17; 2 Chron. 34:24-25). Yet, the Lord promised Josiah not to bring destruction during his reign, “because your heart was tender, and you humbled yourself before God when you heard His words” (2 Chron. 34:27).

After hearing this, Josiah called the people to pledge to follow God’s word (2 Kings 23:1-3). He then proceeded further to remove idolatry. This involved destroying idols and booths for ritual homosexual prostitution that were actually located within the temple (2 Kings 23:4-7). He burned the bones of dead idolatrous priests and scattered their ashes over former places of idolatry (2 Chron. 34:4,5). This defiled these places, preventing any future idolatry in them. One such place was the valley outside of Jerusalem called “the valley of the Son of Hinnom.” Josiah’s grandfather, Manasseh, had sacrificed his own children there, in addition to practicing witchcraft and sorcery (2 Chron. 33:6). Josiah “defiled” the place in the valley called Topheth, where sacrifices were made to Molech (2 Kings 23:10). In fulfillment of the prophecy concerning him, he destroyed the altar built by Jeroboam and burned the bones of its priests over it (2 Kings 23:15,16).

Josiah also moved forward constructively to lead the people toward a restoration of true worship. He led the people to observe the Passover in such a way as “had never been held since the days of the judges who judged Israel, nor in all the days of the kings of Israel and the kings of Judah” (2 Kings 23:22). Josiah reigned thirteen years after the finding of the book of the law (2 Kings 22:1). He died after being mortally wounded, opposing Pharaoh Neco at Megiddo, and was lamented by all the people and the prophet, Jeremiah (2 Chron. 35:20-27).

Josiah lived only thirty-nine years, but his short life teaches us that a difficult childhood does not mean that someone cannot choose to do right. It shows us that seeking God demands a willingness to turn from the errors (sometimes) of our own family. Finally, it teaches us that no matter how long the truth is forsaken, it is still the truth.

— Via Truth Magazine, April 2018, No. 4, Volume 62, https://truthmagazine.com/kindle/2018/2018-04-apr/02_Meditations.htm
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The World’s Oldest Lie

Heath Rogers

When Satan appeared to Eve in the garden, he began to put doubts in her head regarding the command of God. He asked if God had said “You shall not eat of every tree of the garden.” Eve responded that she and her husband could eat of the fruit of every tree in the garden but one, adding that God had said, “You shall not eat it, nor shall you touch it, lest you die.” Satan responded, “You will not surely die” (Gen. 3:1-4).

The book of Revelation says that Satan “deceives the whole world” (12:9). Jesus told the unbelieving Jews, “You are of your father the devil, and the desires of your father you want to do. He was a murderer from the beginning, and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he speaks a lie, he speaks from his own resources, for he is a liar and the father of it” (John 8:44). In “the beginning” Satan attempted to murder the human race by tempting Eve with a lie. He lied about the penalty or consequence of sin. Eve may not have understood what death was, but she certainly understood that it was the penalty for eating the fruit of the tree in the midst of the garden. Satan got her to believe that there really wasn’t a consequence for sin.

Satan’s lie continued, calling God’s character into question: “For God knows that in the day you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil” (Gen. 3:5). He got Eve to believe that eating the fruit would actually benefit her, and that God was holding her back from having or enjoying something that she had a right to experience.

The oldest lie in the world is still being told today. Every day we are given the impression that there is no penalty for violating God’s commands. Sinners go unpunished. We are told that life is ours to enjoy. Live it up. You only go around once. You deserve a break today. Young people are “expected” to experiment and sow their wild oats. Fornicators, homosexuals, pornographers, gamblers, drinkers, liars, etc., all follow their lusts while claiming “I’m not hurting anybody.” We see it happen around us so much that we may be tempted to believe it ourselves.

However, the Bible clearly warns us about the consequences of sin. Paul said that the wages of sin is death (Rom. 6:23). Solomon wrote that the way of the transgressor is hard (Prov. 13:15). Moses warned “be sure your sin will find you out” (Num. 32:23). Jesus spoke of the binding nature of sin when He said “Most assuredly, I say to you, whoever commits sin is a slave of sin” (8:34).

Worldly sinners are not the only ones who lie regarding the consequences of sin. The Calvinist lies about the penalty of sin when he insists that the sins committed by a child of God cannot condemn his soul. However, the Bible says that a child of God has to repent, confess, and pray in order to receive the forgiveness of his sins (Acts 8:22; 1 John 1:9). The Hebrew Christians were warned, “For if we sin willfully after we have received the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins, but a certain fearful expectation of judgment, and fiery indignation which will devour the adversaries” (Heb. 10:26-27).

“You will not surely die.” The oldest lie in the world, still alive and well today. We know better. Let us strive to live holy lives before the Judge of all the earth.

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, May 2013
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Jude 1:4

“For certain individuals whose condemnation was written about long ago have secretly slipped in among you.  They are ungodly people, who pervert the grace of our God into a license for immorality and deny Jesus Christ our only Sovereign and Lord” (NIV, emphasis mine, tte).
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The High Cost of Sin

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on this following link while on the Internet: 

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/High_Cost_of_Sin.mp4

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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent
 of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith
 in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Congregational Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) To Timothy: How To Live By Faith In Any Century, 1 Timothy 6:1-20 (Jon W. Quinn))
2) Pointed Perceptions (Perry Hurst)
3) Our Responsibility Toward One Another (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
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To Timothy: How To Live By Faith In Any Century
1 Timothy 6:1-20

Jon W. Quinn

It is remarkable how the teachings of the Bible seem so applicable to life’s situations in the twentieth century. There is a reason for that; it addresses unchanging human needs and longings. In our constantly changing world there are some things that remain the same. Spiritual, moral, emotional problems which exist today are the same as existed in the first century. The answers are the same as well.

For the Christian, there are several things to do to insure our walk by faith will be successful. Paul writes to Timothy about some of these things encouraging him to pass the word along to others as he fulfills his role as a preacher. Notice the sixth chapter of first Timothy for some important advice from Jesus to His people as given through His apostle.

Concern for God’s Reputation

“Let all who are under the yoke as slaves regard their own masters as worthy of all honor so that the name of God and our doctrine may not be spoken against” (1 Timothy 6:1).

Our society has done away with the institution of slavery, and for that we are thankful. But do not think that this admonition is outdated; it is not. There is still a social order. There are still those in authority. We can still damage our God’s name and our doctrine by being belligerent, rebellious or disorderly.

“For such is the will of God, that by doing right you may silence the ignorance of foolish men” (I Peter 2:15).

There are many ways in which we can act so that we bring reproach upon God and the teachings of the New Testament. To be lazy or dishonest; to be arrogant or selfish; to be weak-willed or hypocritical would allow enemies of God to charge that belief in God and living by His word causes such behavior. Of course, it is a false charge, but one that will be made just the same. Do not allow your undisciplined actions be the excuse for such talk.

Concern for Sound Doctrine

“If anyone advocates a different doctrine, and does not agree with sound words, those of our Lord Jesus Christ, and with the doctrine conforming to godliness, he is conceited and understands nothing…” (1 Timothy 6:3-4a).

Many will tell you that doctrine is not very important and a person’s doctrinal stance should make very little difference. But the context of this verse proves that God looks at the matter of doctrinal purity as being very important. One who has a casual attitude toward doctrine has a much different attitude than what the New Testament teaches us to have. The context suggests that strife and division result from those who advocate different doctrines; not from those who insist that doctrinal purity be maintained. It is not that we should insist on having everything just our way; we definitely should not. But we must insist on having everything God’s way. His word must be our only standard.

Concern for Proper Values

“But godliness actually is a means of great gain, when accompanied by contentment…for the love of money is the root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith, and pierced themselves with many a pang” (1 Timothy 6:6,10).

When a person’s values are warped, then his priorities will also be. Many are obsessed with money and because of that have cheated others, hurt their loved ones and emptied their lives of any true meaning. It is easy for a rich person to surround himself with people, but difficult to know who his true friends are. A man or woman who has made themselves rich but destroyed their relationship with God and family is certainly not to be envied. Even the rich must resign themselves to take no more out of this world than what they brought into it. There is something better than riches… there is “the treasure of a good foundation for the future, so they may take hold of that which is life indeed” (1 Timothy 6:19).
“…for where your treasure is, there will your heart be also” (Matthew 6:21).

Concern for Winning the Fight

“Fight the good fight of faith; take hold of the eternal life to which you were called, and you made the good confession in the presence of many witnesses” (1 Timothy 6:12).

Discipleship is not for the weak of character. There are things which must be avoided and principles for which to stand. “Pursue righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance and gentleness.”

Such commitment calls for strength and courage. It means having to stand for what is right even when in the minority. Paul reminds Timothy of how Jesus stood before Pilate and spoke the truth. He would not hide what He was nor what He stood for. He handled the truth with dignity and was unashamed of His position, though in bonds and being terribly mocked and ridiculed. Never has there been a better example of a hero than Jesus. Certainly disciples of Jesus will not yield their ground when they stand on the rock of truth. How sad that some members of the church have already surrendered by waving the white flag and dropping their weapons and armor. They make compromises with the world whenever the world demands it. They will not speak up in behalf of the Savior; they will not endure hardship; they will not put His kingdom first. How unlike our Jesus they are.

“Put on the full armor of God, that you may be able to stand firm against the schemes of the devil” (Ephesians 6:11).

Concern for Honoring Christ

“He who is the blessed and only Sovereign, the King of kings and Lord of lords; who alone possesses immortality and dwells in unapproachable light; whom no man has seen or can see. To Him be honor and eternal dominion! Amen” (1 Timothy 6:15b-16).

Jesus deserves our complete loyalty. He deserves our love and adoration. What He has done for us is far beyond what we deserve. If we have done everything for Him that it is possible for us to do we have still done far less than He deserves.

One day He shall return. We shall then see Him in His glorified state. But we must not wait until then to glorify Him. It is now the time to bow our knees before the King. It is now the time to make sure that all know who it is that we honor. It is now the time to sing His praises; proclaim His word; give thanksgiving in His name and do His work. On that final day at the conclusion of this age, when this mortality has put on immortality and we behold Him in the light which for now is unapproachable, we shall know with certainty that all our honor of Him in this life has been well placed!

Concern for Our Stewardship

“…guard that which has been entrusted to you…” (1 Timothy 6:20).

We have been entrusted with the gospel of Christ. As His people, we need to insure that we do not squander our opportunities to invest it. The gospel is God’s power to save, but there must be those willing to take the gospel to others. In the New Testament times, the early church was extremely successful at this, in part because they realized that it was not only the preacher’s responsibility to take the gospel to others, but each and every Christian. How does God look upon those who would know His will but not share it with others? He will hold us accountable for what we do with the things which He has entrusted to us.

— Via Expository Files 1.5; May 1994
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“not lagging behind in diligence, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord”

Romans 12:11, NASB
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Pointed Perceptions

Perry Hurst

The Psalmist said, “This is the day which the Lord has made, Let us rejoice and be glad in it” (Psalm 118:24). This passage causes us to reflect upon an attitude that we ought to have each day of our lives! But how can that be? How can we have such a positive feeling of joy each day? We have trials, sorrows, temptations, heartaches, pains, disappointments, needs, etc. Joy in the midst of all these struggles? Some may think it to be impossible, yet we find the key to such a positive outlook in 2 Corinthians 4:17-18: “For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporal, but the things which are not seen are eternal.”

— Via The Beacon, June 12, 2022
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Our Responsibility Toward One Another

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Serving_Others_080722.mp4


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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized
 in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) This Man You Nailed to a Cross (Chris Simmons)
2) There is no Substitute for God (Jon W. Quinn)
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This Man You Nailed to a Cross

Chris Simmons

Following Christ’s ascension to the right hand of God’s throne, Peter, having received the Holy Spirit, which Christ had promised His apostles, took his stand with the other eleven and responded to the accusation that they were drunk because they were speaking in tongues. In Acts 2:15, Peter pointed out that devout Jews such as the apostles would not be so intoxicated at the third hour of the day, which is the hour of prayer (9 a.m. as we know it). Then, under the Holy Spirit’s inspiration, Peter established that they were all witnessing the fulfillment of the prophecy spoken by Joel; Peter stated, “This is that which hath been spoken through the prophet Joel” (Acts 2:16-21; Joel 2:28-32). Having defended the twelve and establishing what they were all witnessing, Peter then took the offensive and began to teach and convict the multitude. He began by teaching them about Jesus of Nazareth, convicting them of what they had done to Him, and then in contrast, establishing what God had done for Him.

In Acts 2:22, Peter began by establishing that Jesus’ works proved that He was from God. “Jesus the Nazarene, a man attested to you by God with miracles and wonders and signs.” The word attested, in the Greek, means that Jesus was demonstrated, exhibited, or accredited to be the Divine Son of God.

During His ministry, a multitude came to Jesus and asked, “What then do You do for a sign, that we may see, and believe You? What work do You perform?” (John 6:30). Just prior to that incident, in John 5, in addition to citing the witness of John the Baptist (verse 33), the Father (verse 7) and the Scriptures (verse 39), Jesus also spoke to the witness of His works when He said, “But the witness which I have is greater than that of John; for the works which the Father has given Me to accomplish, the very works that I do, bear witness of Me, that the Father has sent Me” (John 5:36). At least some recognized this about Jesus, as Nicodemus in John 3:2 said, “Rabbi, we know that You have come from God as a teacher; for no one can do these signs that You do unless God is with him.”

Not only did Peter point out Jesus’ works, which attested to His Divine status, but in Acts 2:22, he also pointed out that they were “performed … in your midst, just as you yourselves know.” There was no need for Peter to argue his point regarding the miracles, and wonders, and signs. Jesus had not performed His works in secret. The fact that He performed them was irrefutable. They could not be denied. The only thing His enemies could do was attempt to ascribe them to the power of the “ruler of the demons” (Matthew 12:24). Jesus proved that argument to be fallacious when He stated, “If Satan casts out Satan, he is divided against himself; how then shall his kingdom stand?” (verses 25-29).

Likewise irrefutable were the mighty works performed by Jesus’ apostles. The Jewish council noted this fact when, regarding the healing of the lame man that had taken place in Acts chapter 3, they said, “What shall we do with these men? For the fact that a noteworthy miracle has taken place through them is apparent to all who live in Jerusalem, and we cannot deny it”  (Acts 4:16).

Next, in Acts 2, Peter taught that Jesus’ deliverance to “godless men” was not because of Divine inability to rescue Him or establish Him as a physical King; rather, it was part of God’s eternal plan. “This Man (was) delivered up by the predetermined plan and foreknowledge of God” (Acts 2:23). Jesus’ crucifixion was not an accident. It was part of God’s “predetermined plan and foreknowledge.”

  • The word “predetermined” means “what is defined, marked out, or bounded; as, to mark out or define the boundary of a field” (Barnes’ Notes, Electronic Database by Bible Soft).
  • The word “plan” carries with it the idea of one’s purpose, decree, or will.

Thus, it was God’s will or purpose, “before the foundation of the world” (Ephesians 1:3-12) to mark out or define that man’s salvation would come through Christ’s sacrifice on the cross and the blood He shed. Jesus “laid down His life” (John 10:14-18). Christ’s life was not taken from Him against His will; He offered it according to God’s will.

However, although it was God’s will for Christ to bear the sins of the world, Peter made sure the multitude understood that they were guilty of sin because of what they had done. He stated, in verse 23, regarding this Jesus of Nazareth, “You nailed (Him) to a cross by the hands of godless men and put Him to death.” Peter made it clear that all who participated, as well as those who simply shouted their encouragement and support — “crucify Him” (Mark 15:13-14) — were guilty of murdering God’s Son.

To the Jews, condemning a person to die by nailing him to a cross (crucifixion) was condemning him to die as the worst of criminals. “To the Jewish people, crucifixion represented the most disgusting form of death: ‘He who is hanged is accursed of God’ (Deuteronomy 21:23; Galatians 3:13). Yet, the Jewish Sanhedrin sought and obtained Roman authorization to have Jesus crucified (Mark 15:13-15)” (Nelson’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary).

The fact that the one who claimed to be the “King of the Jews” (Matthew 27:11) was put to death in such a horrible, demeaning way presented to many Jews a most imposing stumbling block to claiming Him as the “Lord and Christ” and accepting Him as the true Messiah. Paul summed up the crucifixion in this way, “We preach Christ crucified, to Jews a stumbling block, and to Gentiles foolishness, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God” (1 Corinthians 1:23-24).

In Acts 2:24, Peter emphatically established that the efforts of those godless men who nailed Jesus to the cross to thwart God’s predetermined plan failed because God raised Him up. We see the contrast between men’s feeble will (they put Christ to death) and God’s immutable, sovereign, and predetermined will (God raised Him up). Jesus’ resurrection is the foundation for our hope and salvation, and the culminating declaration of His Divinity and victory.

We read in 1 Corinthians 15:14-19, “And if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is vain, your faith also is vain. Moreover we are even found to be false witnesses of God, because we witnessed against God that He raised Christ, whom He did not raise, if in fact the dead are not raised. For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised; and if Christ has not been raised, your faith is worthless; you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If we have hoped in Christ in this life only, we are of all men most to be pitied.”

Also, in Romans 1:1-5, we read, “Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which He promised beforehand through His prophets in the holy Scriptures, concerning His Son, who was born of a descendant of David according to the flesh, who was declared the Son of God with power by the resurrection from the dead, according to the Spirit of holiness, Jesus Christ our Lord.”

In Acts 2:36, Peter concluded his sermon regarding this Jesus whom they had nailed to a cross, “Therefore let all the house of Israel know for certain that God has made Him both Lord and Christ – this Jesus whom you crucified.” Those Jews then asked, What shall we do?  We, too, must give attention to the question, “What shall we do with the crucified Christ?”

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, March 2009
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2 Corinthians 5:14-15

“For the love of Christ controls us, having concluded this, that one died for all, therefore all died; and He died for all, so that they who live might no longer live for themselves, but for Him who died and rose again on their behalf.”

— NASB

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There is no Substitute for God

Jon W. Quinn

As the deer pants for the water brooks, So my soul pants for You, O God. My soul thirsts for God, for the living God; When shall I come and appear before God? (Psalm 42:1-2).

I read the following statement some time ago. I thought about it. “God may well be taken as a substitute for everything; but nothing can be taken as a substitute for God.”

That’s true. It took me a bit to see the truth in it, but finally the light came on.

With God there is always hope for the faithful. There is always prospect and assurance and peace. There is confidence that, at last, all will be well… more than well… perfect. We can suffer the loss of anything, even life itself, and still have this assurance. As long as we have God, then ultimately all will become as it ought to be because God is more powerful than death. That is why nothing can be a substitute for God. Nothing else does that.

But, on the other hand, without God we are destined to lose everything worthwhile and there is no hope of even a glimmer of good. This is why we ought not spend our lives chasing after futile things and neglect God. Nothing can take the place of God. Not really. We can put other things in God’s place, but they will fail to do what God does. Nothing can take His place in our lives.

The Lord told His people, “You must not turn aside, for then you would go after futile things which cannot profit or deliver, because they are futile” (1 Samuel 12:21).

Jesus once asked His apostles if they were giving up and going away. The answer came back, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have words of eternal life” (John 6:68).

Jesus identifies Himself as “The Bread of Life” because He sustains us through our deepest needs. Just as candy can spoil our appetite and cause us to pass up needed nourishment, the love of things of the world can rob us of our hunger for righteousness and leave us growing ever sicker and ultimately dying a spiritual death. Things of this creation can never do for us what God can do. There is no substitute. People need to stop looking for one.

— Via the Facebook site for the Bradley church of Christ, June 22, 2022
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Love — The More Excellent Way (Heath Rogers)
2) Leave the Solution to God (Frank Himmel)
3) Thankful to God for the Great Debt He Paid! (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Love — The More Excellent Way

Heath Rogers

First Corinthians thirteen is a favorite chapter of the Bible to many people. Perhaps its appeal lies in the fact that, in just a few verses, the Holy Spirit is able to do what no poet, professor, or philosopher has been able to do throughout all of human history — give man an accurate and complete understanding of what it means to love.

Verses 4-7 provide a list of fifteen characteristics of love. As one progresses through this list, he gains a better understanding of love and can come to understand why it is the greatest gift that man can possess. Unless otherwise noted, quotations are from the New King James version.

Love suffers long: This characteristic emphasizes patience with others. It is translated from the Greek word makrothumeo. This is actually a compound word: makros meaning “long,” and thumos which means “temper.” Thus, the person who is longsuffering is literally the individual who has a long-burning fuse. It describes the man who has the power to retaliate when he is wronged, but has the presence of mind and strength of character to hold his anger in check.

and is kind: The term in the original language literally means to show oneself “useful”; the carrying out of useful deeds to help others. Love is considerate and always provides what is of value or worth to others.

Kindness is the perfect compliment to longsuffering. While longsuffering is willing to take anything from anyone, kindness is willing to give anything to meet the needs of others.

love does not envy: The New American Standard renders this characteristic as “not jealous.” This phrase is translated from a Greek word meaning “to be heated or to boil.” This term can have a positive meaning, “to desire earnestly,” and a negative meaning, “to envy another.” Here, it is used in the negative sense. Love does not cause one to “boil” over the success or advantages of another.

love does not parade itself, is not puffed up: Various versions have translated this phrase differently. For instance, the King James reads “charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up,” while the New American Standard reads “love does not brag and is not arrogant” (NASV).

The first of these expressions represents the speech or action that is produced by pride, while the second represents the attitude of pride itself. The root word for the first expression in the Greek means “wind bag,” while the root for the second means “bellows.” Bragging is fed by an arrogant attitude. Love has neither quality. Love is humble, seeking to perform its work without desire for recognition or reward.

does not behave rudely: This phrase is also rendered differently by various translations: “doth not behave itself unseemly” (KJV), “does not act unbecomingly” (NASV). William Barclay translates the phrase as “Love does not behave gracelessly.”

The phrase is translated from the Greek word aschemoneo, which literally means to go against the scheme. It refers to the act of going against what is accepted as the norm, to “stick out” or to be inappropriate. An arrogant man, in an effort to promote himself, will forget to treat others with respect and consideration. However, love is mannerly in that it never conducts itself in a way that is contrary to accepted standards of decency.

does not seek its own: This characteristic describes the person who is more concerned with his duties than his rights. Love does not make “self” the center of the universe. Jesus manifested this characteristic of love to the world in that He “did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many” (Matt. 20:28).

is not provoked: This characteristic is translated from the Greek work paroxuno which means to spur on, to stimulate, or to stir to anger. This describes the person who has control over his temper. Love does not go around with a chip on its shoulder looking for reasons to become upset or irritated at personal offences.

thinks no evil: The New American Standard renders this phrase as “does not take into account a wrong suffered.” This is translated from the Greek word logizomai. This was a bookkeeping term that was used for the act of entering a debt on a ledger so that it would not be forgotten. Love does not keep a running account of offenses against itself with a view towards revenge. With a less technical understanding, love does not dwell upon personal offenses or evil deeds that it has been called upon to endure. Love does not harbor bitterness and resentment. It knows how to forget.

does not rejoice in iniquity: Many people rejoice in sin, either their own sin or the sins of others (Rom. 1:32). Love is active goodwill towards others; sin brings harm and loss to others. As such, the two are opposed to each other. Love is free from the malice that takes pleasure in sin and finds satisfaction in discussing the sins of others.

but rejoices in the truth: Love has the courage to face the truth and to rejoice when the cause of truth, justice, and righteousness is upheld. Love takes pleasure in the truth being taught, defended, and lived (2 John 4; 3 John 3-4).

bears all things: In one sense, love has the strength to bear whatever afflictions or persecutions may personally come upon an individual. However, the meaning of this term in the original language indicates that this quality is shown outwardly as opposed to inwardly. The Greek word means “to protect or preserve by covering.” Love will do everything it can to cover the sin and shame of the person who is the object of its affection. “And above all things have fervent love for one another, for ‘love will cover a multitude of sins'” (1 Peter 4:8). Love does not ignore sin. It will warn, rebuke, and chasten as needed, but its first impulse will be to protect the object of love.

believes all things: Love is not gullible or naive, but neither is it cynical. Love’s first impulse is to give others the benefit of the doubt, believing in them and expecting the best from them.

hopes all things: When things do look bad, love hopes for the best. Instead of putting the worst interpretation on another’s actions or motives, love compels us to put the best interpretation upon them.

endures all things: Even when it has been proven wrong, love does not give up. It stands up and continues onward against all odds.

The New International Version renders verse seven as “It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” These four statements form a progression. Love bears or protects the one who it believes in. When the evidence suggests otherwise, love will continue to hope for the best. Even if love is brought to the point of personal injury, it will continue to endure.

Love never fails: This phrase is found at the beginning of verse eight, which begins another section in chapter thirteen. However, I personally like to join it to the fifteen characteristic found in verses 4-7. Love is the greatest gift because it is permanent. It will never fail.

This great chapter can be studied for a lifetime and yet it will never cease to challenge those who desire to be like their Master. May we turn our attention to it more often and take the time to consider the standard that it sets for our lives. “Jesus said to him, ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.’ This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like it: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself’” (Matt. 22:37-39).

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, March 2012
——————–

-2-

Leave the Solution to God

Frank Himmel

Paul observed that we do not know how to pray as we should (Romans 8:26). That being true, we can learn a valuable lesson from the apostles.

When Peter healed a lame man at the temple, it provided occasion for the second recorded gospel sermon (Acts 3). That sermon ended when the temple guards arrived to arrest Peter and John. A night in jail was followed by a day in court. But filled with the Holy Spirit, the accused became the prosecutors. Peter charged the court with having crucified Jesus, and in so doing rejecting the very cornerstone of God’s building. He added that Jesus is the only means of salvation.

The judges were taken aback. They marveled at Peter and John’s boldness. They doubtless were tempted to respond severely, but the presence in court of the man who had been healed and public interest in the case left them few options. The court decided on a “cease and desist” order: the apostles were not to speak at all in the name of Jesus. After further threatening, they were released.

Peter and John went to their brethren. Together they prayed about the situation (Acts 4:24-30). The prayer first addressed God the creator, who has all power. It then recognized His foreknowledge and rule. When this same court, along with Herod and Pilate, had done their worst—when they crucified Jesus—they had done nothing more than what God’s hand and purpose predestined to occur.

Now it was time for the apostles’ request. “And now, Lord, take note of their threats, and grant that Your bond-servants may speak Your word with all confidence” (v. 29). Rather than telling God what to do about the problem, they simply prayed that He would take note of it. They left it to Him as to how best to deal with it. And they asked for strength.

One of the benefits of praying to an all-wise God is knowing that He will do what is best. We don’t need to tell Him how to solve our problems. Just bring them before Him and pray for strength. Then leave His throne, confident that He will do what is best.

— Via Pathlights, January 2, 2022
——————–

-3-

Thankful to God for the Great Debt He Paid!

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Indebted_072422.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe
 in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classesand 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Abounding Through Many Thanksgivings to God (R.J. Evans)
2) The Weightier Matters (Ethan R. Longhenry)
3) The Great Value of Hope (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Abounding Through Many Thanksgivings to God

R.J. Evans

We are so fortunate to live in a country that realizes the need to set aside a special day of “Thanksgiving.” Our nation celebrates this holiday on the fourth Thursday in November — this coming Thursday. However, as Christians, every day should be a day of “thanksgiving” because we have innumerable blessings that come from God each day of our lives.

The Apostle Paul gave much encouragement to the Corinthians concerning the matter of their giving to the needy saints in Jerusalem. He used the churches of Macedonia as an example of some who gave with joy, liberality, willingness, and beyond their ability — despite the fact they were in deep poverty (II Corinthians 8:1-7). After instructing them to give purposefully and cheerfully (II Corinthians 9:7), he went on to assure them that “For the administration of this service not only supplies the needs of the saints, but also is abounding through many thanksgivings to God” (II Corinthians 9:12). Take note of the last phrase of this text where he said, “abounding through many thanksgivings to God.”

In order to truly receive God’s bountiful blessings, we must be thankful to God. The matter of giving thanks unto God should come first and foremost in everything we receive. The Apostle Paul told the Thessalonians “in everything give thanks; for this is the will of God in Christ for you” (I Thessalonians 5:18).

Paul instructed the Philippians to “Be anxious for nothing, but in everything by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be made known to God” (Philippians 4:6). The more we are thankful, the greater the abundance of the blessings that will be received.

The parable of the prodigal (wasteful) son demonstrates an attitude of ingratitude. He desired to get all that was his, get as far away from his family as he could, and then go out and enjoy himself in “prodigal living.” However, it became his road to disaster. Finally, while in the pigpen, when he came to himself, he became thankful and appreciative for what he had back home, and determined with all his heart to go back with the intention of simply becoming one of his father’s hired servants. We know the joyous ending of this return to his loving father (Luke 15:11-24). This story is a good illustration of how prosperity and wastefulness can produce ingratitude — a failure to be thankful and recognize God as the source of all blessings. See the warnings against this kind of failure in Deuteronomy 6:10-12 and I Timothy 6:6-10, 17-19.

Thankfulness was an attribute of Jesus while here on earth. When He prayed to His Father, He would thank Him for a number of blessings. Before He fed the multitudes, He gave thanks for the food. “Then He commanded the multitudes to sit down on the grass. And He took the five loaves and the two fish, and looking up to heaven, He blessed and broke and gave the loaves to the disciples; and the disciples gave to the multitudes” (Matthew 14:19); “And He took the seven loaves and the fish and gave thanks, broke them and gave them to His disciples; and the disciples gave to the multitude” (15:36).

When he raised Lazarus from the dead, He thanked His Father for hearing His prayer: “Father, I thank You that You have heard Me. And I know that You always hear Me, but because of the people who are standing by I said this, that they may believe that You sent Me” (John 11:41-42).

Before He gave His disciples the bread and the cup in the memorial of His death (the Lord’s Supper), He gave thanks for the bread and for the cup (Matthew 26:26; Mark 14:22; Luke 22:19-20; I Corinthians 11:24-25).

Being thankful is not an option in the life of a Christian if he wants to be spiritually strong — it is a must! David expressed it this way: “Surely the righteous shall give thanks in Your name; The upright shall dwell in Your presence” (Psalms 40:13).

The Apostle Paul said: “speaking to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody in your heart to the Lord, giving thanks always for all things to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 5:19-20).

The giving of thanks is the will of God in our lives. We will enjoy even greater blessings by being thankful for those we have already received. It must be so heartbreaking to God when we are ungrateful for the things that He has provided for us. This is very evident when Jesus healed the ten lepers, but only one of them came back to give thanks for what He had done for him. Jesus responded by asking — “Were there not ten cleansed? But where are the nine?” (Luke 17:11-19). We can just sense the sadness on His part when He asked these questions.

Let us genuinely practice being thankful; it will truly enrich our lives. “I will praise the name of God with a song, and magnify Him with thanksgiving” (Psalms 69:30).

– Via Articles from the La Vista church of Christ, November 25, 2020
——————–

-2-

The Weightier Matters

Ethan R. Longhenry

“Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye tithe mint and anise and cummin, and have left undone the weightier matters of the law, justice, and mercy, and faith: but these ye ought to have done, and not to have left the other undone”(Matthew 23:23).

Human beings tend to maintain a narrow focus on various matters. It is easy for some people to allow a select criteria set to guide them; they decide to view everything through a certain set of lenses.

The Pharisees and scribes were not much different. The New Testament reveals that they focused —  down to the last detail — on preserving the law of Moses and the traditions that developed around that law. Their hyper-vigilance about the law led them to overemphasize the more minor actions while neglecting those that were more significant. Because they focused on, and perfectly accomplished, the minor actions, they felt a sense of pride that led to a false sense of security and satisfaction. They behaved as though being vigilant about not working on the Sabbath, washing their hands before eating, and tithing down to the level of spices would be sufficient to merit God’s commendation.

Jesus condemned their myopia. Even if they are more quantifiable and objective, performing these minor acts of obedience is not sufficient to obtain God’s commendation. Believers must not neglect the law’s weightier matters — justice, mercy, and faith.

The scribes and Pharisees were certainly guilty of such neglect. The Pharisees in particular considered themselves morally superior to their fellow men. This is evidenced by the Pharisee’s prayer in Luke 18:11-12 and the attitudes of the Pharisees in John 9. They deemed themselves to be righteous and everyone else to be sinners, despite the fact that they had also sinned and certainly were not maintaining a Godly sense of faith, justice, or mercy. Their condemnation was just.

Nevertheless, this passage also exposes a major fault line within the thoughts of many religious people. They are adamant about performing the weightier matters of the law, concluding that since we are under grace, we need to get the big things right and allow the little things to slide. Others protest the very idea that some matters are weightier than others and stress the need to do all things as God has charged us.

The truth, as usual, is somewhere in the middle. Jesus taught that some matters are weightier than others. This means that some attitudes/actions have more significance than others. This is evident in the examples given; justice, faith, and mercy are of greater significance than tithing spices. Tithing spices benefited God and His Temple; but practicing justice, mercy, and faith benefits God, His Temple, and all men. Furthermore, faith, justice, and mercy deal with every aspect of a person — his mind, his attitude, and his actions. One cannot easily have faith or show justice and mercy while internally despising God or his brethren. Tithing should flow from a heart full of faith, but a person could tithe without having proper attitudes.

Some matters are more significant than others, but that does not mean that we can let the less significant matters slide and still be pleasing to God. Notice that Jesus did not condemn the scribes or Pharisees for tithing the spices; in fact, He said, “..but these ye ought to have done.” The problem was not that the scribes and Pharisees were tithing spices; the problem was that they were tithing spices and neglecting faith, justice, and mercy. It would be a gross perversion of this text to insinuate that if they had performed the weightier matters of the law but had not tithed the spices, Jesus would have justified them. There is no basis for such a claim.

This is not an either-or proposition. The scribes and Pharisees should have accomplished both the weightier matters of the law and the spice tithing. If we serve God as we ought to serve Him, the less weighty matters flow from the weightier. Because we are dedicated to love, humility, faith, and service — the weightier matters of the new covenant (cf. Romans 1:16-17; Romans 6:16-21; Romans 13:8-11; Ephesians 2:1-10; Philippians 2:1-11; Hebrews 11:1, 6; 1 Peter 1:22; 1 Peter 5:6-7) — we will make sure we accomplish God’s will in simple, quantifiable, and objective matters, as well as in more substantive and difficult ones. We will assemble to encourage one another (1 Corinthians 14:23; Hebrews 10:25), give as we have prospered, both to the church and to those in need (1 Corinthians 16:1-3; 2 Corinthians 8:1-9:15; Galatians 2:10; 6:10), and do other such things. We will also love our neighbors as ourselves and seek their welfare (Romans 13:8-10; Philippians 2:1-4), and offer ourselves to God as living and holy sacrifices (Romans 12:1).

Jesus’ message to the scribes and Pharisees represents a necessary warning against spiritual myopia — focusing on accomplishing certain elements of God’s purposes and neglecting others. We cannot be justified by taking care of less significant, detailed matters while neglecting those that are weightier. Likewise, we cannot be justified in thinking that if we accomplish the weightier matters of God’s will, we can ignore those that are less significant. If God commanded it, there’s value in doing it. Let us seek to accomplish the whole will of God, and not neglect any aspect of it.

— Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, May 2010
——————–

-3-

The Great Value of Hope

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Hope_071722.mp4

——————–

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe i
n the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Standing Tall in an Ungodly World: Jude 20-25 (Jon W. Quinn)
2) A Christian in Relation to Various Things (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Standing Tall in an Ungodly World: Jude 20-25

Jon W. Quinn

Jude, the brother of the Lord, wrote of the harsh environment in which disciples of Jesus found themselves during the final half of the first century. He appeals for them to “contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints” (JUDE 3b). This shows us that the revealing of “the faith” — that is, those teachings given by God, including the account of Jesus’ life and His precepts by which we are able to live lives of faith — was never meant to be an ongoing thing. “The faith” was “once for all delivered to the saints.” This means that the document given to the world by Jesus through His chosen ones in the first century is complete and adequate for our spiritual needs.

Jude also gives warning of the corrupting influence that false teachers were having in turning the grace of God into a license to sin (vs 4). Sounds like a much needed warning for today as well, as does the remainder of this short letter.

Jude reminds the disciples of God’s judgments in the past, and affirms that God will judge the world again. Jude also warns that the mocking of the rebellious ought not be a surprise. It was not unforeseen. “But you, beloved, ought to remember the words that were spoken beforehand by the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ, that they were saying to you, ‘In the last time there shall be mockers, following after their own ungodly lusts’“ (JUDE 17,18).

So what were these hard pressed disciples of the first century to do? How would they successfully stand in a world that so often treats them with contempt? The answer to these questions is important for us as well as them, because we live today in such an environment!

Inspired by the Holy Spirit, Jude closes his short letter by giving a brief summary about what the Christian can do to remain strong. The solution had been given previously in other Scriptures; for example, Peter had dealt with it in greater length in his second epistle (to which Jude refers in vss 17-18). Notice how Jude summarizes the Lord’s solution to dealing with these pressures:

“But you, beloved, building yourselves up on your most holy faith; praying in the Holy Spirit; keep yourselves in the love of God, waiting anxiously for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ to eternal life. And have mercy on some, who are doubting; save others, snatching them from the fire; and on some have mercy with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh. Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy, to the only God our savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory and majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen” (JUDE 20-25).

Build Yourself Up On Your Faith

“But you, beloved, building yourselves up on your most holy faith…” (JUDE 20). Success will only come through a firm reliance upon the “most holy faith.” It is genuine. It is true. It is powerful. Doctrines and traditions of men, speculations and opinions, philosophies and theories will only bring ruin.

It is our responsibility to “build” ourselves up in this faith. To accomplish this, “the most holy faith” must be known and applied. To know it and not use it will suffice nothing. Many people know the right thing to do. Far fewer are willing to do it.

Can the Lord count on you? Will you prepare yourself to stand up for Jesus? Knowing the truth brings freedom only to those who are willing to apply it (JOHN 8:31,32).

Pray in the Holy Spirit

“…praying in the Holy Spirit” (JUDE 20). It ought to be no surprise that prayer has an important role to play in “standing tall in an ungodly world.” But there is a proper way to pray as well as an improper way to pray. Our text does not just say to pray, but to “pray in the Holy Spirit.”

The Holy Spirit dwells in the Christian who is walking by faith. The evidence of this is not seen through some miraculous manifestation, but rather through the fruit of the Spirit being present in one’s life, as well as the putting away of those fleshly things contrary to the Lord’s will. After listing the fruit of the Spirit; “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control,” the Scripture says, “If we live by the Spirit, let us also walk by the Spirit” (see GALATIANS 5:16-26). So, for one to “pray in the Spirit” he must be “walking by the Spirit.”

What would one pray in such circumstances? Certainly he would echo the words of Jesus’ prayer, “Not My will, but Thy will be done.” He would ask for strength and wisdom. He would pray for those that persecute him. Such a prayer will certainly be answered!

Keep Yourself in the Love of God

“…keep yourselves in the love of God…” (JUDE 21). God, because of His love for us, has provided for our salvation. He gave His beloved Son. We are wonderfully blessed because of God’s love for us. He is our great Savior!

But while His love is unconditional; He gave His Son for the whole world without any condition at all; the blessings of His love are not unconditional. If they were, then everybody would be saved. But some are lost; Why? Because they have not or are not meeting the conditions God has arranged for receiving His blessings.

To stand tall, we must continue to abide in God’s love; that is, to continue to meet the conditions He has established by His grace to receive the benefits of that grace. This is exactly what Jesus said; “If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love; just as I have kept the Father’s commandments, and abide in His love” (JOHN 15:10; cf vss 1-9).

Wait for the Lord and Eternal Life

“…waiting anxiously for the mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ to eternal life” (JUDE 21). Standing tall comes easier for those who look to the final result of faith. Jesus is coming again. He will vindicate the faithful by showing their faith to have been valid. The mocking will die as it is exposed for the absolute foolishness that it really is. Those thought to be wise by the world in their rebellion against the God of heaven will regret their inexcusable obstinacies forever.

“Eternal life” is God’s future for the faithful. This term describes not only the length of existence, but also the dynamic quality of it. The Scriptures describe it as an “inheritance” which is “imperishable” (will not spoil or lose its value) and “undefiled” (pure, unpolluted) and will not “not fade away” (will not lose its luster) which is “reserved in heaven for you” (I PETER 1:4).

Seek to Save Others

“And have mercy on some, who are doubting; save others, snatching them from the fire; and on some have mercy with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh” (JUDE 22,23). They say that the more concerned you are about others, the less your own problems will seem. They are correct.

Every faithful Christian needs to be aware of this very important fact when he is being mocked and treated shamefully: As a Christian, you have much more of true value than those who mock you do! Do not ever regret the choice you made and do not ever trade away the hope you have for something so much less. Do not envy the mocker who may seem so proud and invincible. Instead, be merciful to him. He is in such great need. If he does not awake soon, the fire will get him. You will never stand taller than when you try to snatch him from the flame.

“Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy, to the only God our savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory and majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen” (JUDE 24,25).

— Via The Expository Files 3.1; January 1996

——————–

-2-

A Christian in Relation to Various Things

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/A_Christian_in_Relation_to_Various_Things.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:
1) Contender For The Faith: Jude 3 (Jon W. Quinn)
2) Shrewd Sons (Frank Himmel)
3) Be Fervent (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

Contender For The Faith: Jude 3

Jon W. Quinn

If the Lord takes the time to reveal in His word that something is necessary, then do you suppose it is? Of course it is! Bible says it was needful for the following exhortation to be given and heeded by disciples of Jesus Christ: “I felt it necessary to write to you appealing that you contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints” (Jude 3b). When Jude stresses the importance of this need, then we should understand that because he is writing by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, that this is God’s appraisal of the importance of this admonition.

What Is “The Faith”?

The Lord does not admonish us to contend for “a faith” or “the faith of your choice.” The definite article “the” is used which means a specific faith is being discussed. What is it? Sometimes the word “faith” refers to our own attitude of trust, and sometimes it is used to refer to that truth into which we have placed our trust. It is in this second sense that Jude uses the term; “the faith” is God’s truth; the gospel; His word. The book of Acts tells us that “the word of God kept spreading” and “a great many of the priests were becoming obedient to the faith” (Acts 6:7). So “the faith” is something “obeyed” as well as contended for. It is identified here as “the word of God” (cf. Romans 1:5).

Also, one can be “turned away from the faith” as the false prophet Elymas tried to turn Sergius Paulus away as he heard Paul teaching “the word of God” (Acts 13:7,8). The “gospel” was preached in Derbe and the new disciples made there were encouraged to “continue in the faith” (Acts 14:21,22) which was preached to them (cf. Galatians 1:23). So, “the faith” (and there is just one; Ephesians 4:5) is the word of God.

The Faith Was “Delivered”

Jude also says “the faith” was delivered. Jesus delivered this faith to His apostles and disciples during His personal ministry upon the earth. He also promised His apostles that after His departure, He would send the Holy Spirit to allow them to remember “all” that He had taught them and to supplement His teaching with further instruction (John 14:25,26; 16:13; Acts 1:4,5). This promise was fulfilled on the first Pentecost following the Lord’s ascension (Acts 2:1-4).

The apostles, and those that received the gifts of prophecy and tongues through the laying on of the apostles’ hands (Acts 8:14-18; 2 Timothy 1:6) were God’s delivery system for “the faith.” This continued as the the first century advanced and the result has been preserved in the Bible for you and me today (1 Peter 1:22-25).

The Faith Was “Once for All” Delivered

We are also informed by Jude that this delivery was made “once for all” (NASB). The Greek word (hapax) is more definite than the KJV rendition of “once.” It means “once for all” and shows that the work was completed once for all time and all people (cf. 2 Peter 2:3). This delivery of “the faith” was not to happen once; and then again; and then again. It was to happen “once for all,” and then be completed.

This is important because many false prophets have claimed through the centuries of having additional faith revealed through them. Mohammed claimed such. So did Joseph Smith, Ellen G. White, Sun Yung Moon and others. And then there is the idea among even more “mainstream” religious leaders that they, somehow, have the authority to meet together in conclaves, synods and councils and vote on what the creeds and doctrines of their particular faith will consist. They have no such right because “the faith” has already been determined “once for all” by Jesus Himself (cf. Hebrews 1:1,2).

“Contend Earnestly” For The Faith

“Contending earnestly” for the faith simply means that we must defend it and fight for it. The battle is to win hearts and minds for the Lord. The contender for the faith is not contentious, but he does contend. He or she does not allow false teaching to go unanswered. When the mocker comes, the contender does not respond to foolishness with foolishness, allowing himself to be taken down to the mocker’s level. Rather, the response is a scripturally sound one. It is both reasonable and faithful (2 Peter 3:3-5; 1 Peter 3:15; Jude 17,18). By all means, feel free to “argue religion” but do it with love and concern, for God and for man (Ephesians 4:15). “The faith” has many enemies who will gladly speak against it. Will you speak for it?

The Reason To Contend For The Faith

There are good reasons to be a contender for the faith. Even today, many are seeking to turn the grace of God into licentiousness, as they were when Jude first wrote the words of this admonition (Jude 4). These ideas of moral relativism must be answered. Failure to defend the faith is a denial of the Lord and betrays His love for us (2 Corinthians 5:11;14-15). Does the love Jesus had for you control you so that you will respond when duty to His kingdom calls?

Jude reminds disciples that there are times when godliness will be ridiculed, but that the end result of this kind of disobedience is destruction. This is still so today. Can the Lord count on you to do this necessary thing? To “contend for the faith”?

— via Expository Files 9.10, October 2002
——————–

-2-

Shrewd Sons

Frank Himmel

Jesus once lamented that the sons of this age are shrewder in relation to their own generation than the sons of light (Luke 16:8). In other words, people of the world have more initiative toward worldly things than Christians do toward heavenly things.

Consider a man who wants to catch fish. He does not expect fish to swim up to his door and invite themselves in. He is realistic. He’ll buy ample equipment: a rod and reel (likely several), hooks, a net, a bait bucket, a stringer, all sorts of tackle and a deluxe box to keep it in, a hook remover, a cleaning knife, and anything else he thinks might be useful. He will probably borrow some money and buy a boat. He’ll read books on fishing, watch those fishing shows on TV, and might even go to fishing college (yes, there is such a thing). He’ll start keeping track of the tides. He’ll talk to other fishermen about the best spots to go.

Do you suppose he will give it all up the first time he comes home empty-handed? No way — he’ll just go out earlier the next time! No matter how busy a fisherman is, there is always time for fishing. He will ask his buddies to go with him. And when he snags a big one will he keep it a secret? You know better.

There are Christians who say they want to learn more of God’s word. To accomplish this worthwhile goal they devote a whole thirty minutes per week listening to a preacher! Why don’t they get up an hour earlier or set aside Wednesday evening for Bible Study? Evidently they don’t see much value in that. And when these same folks have no money for books, periodicals, and other study aids, and no time for daily reading, it is little wonder that the fish aren’t biting.

Are you having trouble with a certain temptation? Get help. Talk to others. Talk to God. Read His prescription. Stay away from circumstances where that urge is the greatest. You don’t have to worry about saltwater fish in a freshwater lake.

Want to convert your neighbor? Set a good example. Ask him to come to church with you. Ask him to study with you. You might begin by asking him to tell you about his beliefs. Give him some literature or subscribe to a good magazine for him. You won’t catch a thing unless you throw your hook in.

Here is a young brother who thinks he might want to serve as an elder some day. What should he do? Objectively analyze his character and work on deficiencies. Learn well the word so he can hold it faithfully. Listen to older brethren that his judgment may mature. Develop his skills as a teacher by watching, listening, and doing. Pay close attention to his family. Be hospitable. Work with people. Be careful to protect his reputation. Pray. When the time comes to cast, he’ll be ready.

Heavenly goals merit thought, careful planning, enthusiasm, hard work, and whatever sacrifice of time and money is required. “Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling” (Philippians 2:12).

— via The Beacon, April 10, 2022
——————–

-3-

Be Fervent

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on this link while online:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Fervent_070322.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Congregational Singing Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) God of Wonders (Tony Mauck)
2) Murphy’s Law and Eternity (Greg Gwin)
3) God’s Love for Us (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
——————–

-1-

God of Wonders

Tony Mauck

Habakkuk decries the evil running amuck among the Lord’s people and asks God to act. He could not have anticipated God’s reply, “Look among the nations! Observe! Be astonished! Wonder! Because I am doing something in your days—you would not believe if you were told” (Hab. 1:5). God further reveals that the Babylonians would serve as God’s instrument to judge His wayward people. Habakkuk was not particularly excited about the news and it only raised more questions in his mind.

The last statement of verse 5 is worthy of much meditation as it summarizes the ways and activity of God. Our God is a God of Wonders! “Oh, the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments and unfathomable His ways” (Rom. 11:33). While we may greatly struggle to fully process the depths of this statement about God, such lofty thoughts of Him should be often frequented in our minds.

Three important thoughts flow out of God’s words to Habakkuk: 1) God’s activity astonishes; 2) God’s activity is not thwarted by powerful men; 3) This same God is still active today.

The whole Bible story continually reveals the grandiose nature of God’s doings. Anticipating the role of a suffering Savior in man’s redemption, the inspired psalmist writes, “The stone which the builders rejected has become the chief corner stone. This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes. This is the day which the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it” (Psa. 118:22-24).

Extraordinary signs demonstrate God’s limitless ability. He makes an axe head float. Jesus walks on water. He feeds thousands with a couple of fish and a few loaves of bread while the leftover fragments exceed the original amount of food. While astonishing, such acts are easily consistent with a God whose “understanding is infinite” and One who is “abundant in strength.” After all, “He counts the number of the stars; He gives names to all of them” (Psa. 147:4-5).

Particularly impressive to me is the day of which it is said, “And there was no day like that before it or after it, when the Lord listened to the voice of a man; for the Lord fought for Israel” (Josh. 10:14). Following the dramatic victory at Jericho and ultimate victory at Ai, the Amorite kings and a quite formidable army unite to attack Gibeon, who had made a life-saving alliance with Israel. God informs Joshua, “Do not fear them, for I have given them into your hands, not one of them shall stand before you” (Josh. 10:8). Joshua and his army march all night and suddenly fall upon their foes. The Lord confounds the Amorites and pummels them with hailstones as they flee. Joshua needs more daylight to finish them off and pleads, “O, sun stand still at Gibeon, and O moon in the valley of Aijalon” (Josh. 10:12). Both the sun and moon stop, “And the sun stopped in the middle of the sky and did not hasten to go down for about a whole day” (Josh. 10:13).

Some claim, “Impossible!” We know what Joshua did not. It’s not the sun moving around the earth but the earth’s rotation that gives the appearance of the sun moving from the east to west. We are told by skeptics, if the sun stood still for “about a whole day,” the effects would be cataclysmic. But remember, this is the Creator we’re talking about. Nothing is too difficult for Him.

When God speaks to Habakkuk of His wonder He is about to perform, nothing miraculous is under consideration. Assyria, the present world power, is going to eventually relinquish world dominance to the Babylonians and God is going to use them to judge and teach His people in Judah as He had used the Assyrians— “the rod of My anger”—to punish Israel (Isa. 10:5).

A careful reading of the last several chapters in Daniel causes one to marvel at the activity in the spiritual realm that is behind what is playing out in the kingdoms of men. Government leaders rarely see themselves for what they really are, nothing more than God’s pawns to accomplish His purposes (cf. Isaiah 40:12-25). Even the Babylonians did not see it, “…they whose strength is their god” (Hab. 1:11).

No elected official or government in this whole world is capable of overthrowing what God has done or is planning to do. Certain freedoms might be restricted that we might presently enjoy, but God’s salvation will still be provided to those who seek it. His spiritual kingdom will continue on (cf. Dan. 2:44). History will culminate the way God intends and at the time He decides. Only due to God’s patience does the world still exist to this time (2 Pet. 3:9, 15).

The appropriate reaction to the God of wonders is to fully submit to His purposes. Find your purpose in His great purposes. No greater purpose for our lives can be pursued. If you think about it, how do most people spend their days? They work, accumulate things, improve their circumstances, enjoy family, seek fun and then ultimately someone else ends up with all of their stuff and their position. Eventually, they become just a footnote in history and most are forgotten. How much do you know about your great-great-grandparents?

While our deeds in human history may not be remembered by future generations, involvement in God’s things contains far-reaching and eternal implications…the destiny of souls! Can anything in this world exceed being “a vessel for honor, sanctified, useful to the Master, prepared for every good work” (2 Tim. 2:21)? People get excited about a lot of different things that have a temporal purpose and a temporal reward. We stack those things back to back to back and they become the stuff of life. But those things must be secondary to our greater spiritual purpose and pursued in light of it or they become a snare to our souls. Ultimately, only one thing matters, “…rejoice that your names are recorded in heaven” (Luke 17:20). And God will not forget the things we have done to promote His cause in the world (Heb. 6:10).

Christians find liberation from the anxieties that plague so many. God equips us to face and endure the crippling pain and troubles associated with life in this world. We trust in the God of wonders! We know “Him who is able to do exceeding abundantly beyond all that we ask or think…to Him be the glory in the church and in Christ Jesus to all generations forever and ever. Amen” (Eph. 3:20-21).

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 20, Issue 35 (September 2, 2018)
——————–

-2-

Murphy’s Law and Eternity

Greg Gwin

Have you heard of Murphy’s Law? There are many versions, but the basic notion of Murphy’s Law is this: “If anything can go wrong, it will go wrong.” Any Saturday mechanic, weekend repairman, or home owning handyman will have to admit that this Murphy, whoever he was, had pretty good insight. Skinned knuckles, stripped threads, broken parts, missing pieces, and malfunctioning equipment are a continuing testimony to the apparent accuracy of Murphy’s pessimistic view.

However, there’s one realm where this ‘law’ is clearly not true. Paul wrote, “And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God” (Romans 8:28). This is a wonderful promise, and a great blessing. But note; it is only for “them that love God,” and we know that love for God must be demonstrated by humble obedience. “For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments” (1 John 5:3). Those who will not fully surrender to Him need not expect this outcome in their lives.

But wait! Are we to believe that the life of a faithful Christian will be all roses; no troubles? No. Paul writes again, “Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution” (2 Tim. 3:12). Persecution is never a pleasant thing, but those who serve God are told to expect it. So, how can we reconcile these two statements from Paul?

The answer lies in our perspective; whether we view things temporally or eternally. Only when we are able to see the events of this life in relation to death, judgment, and eternity will we be ready to agree that “all things work together for good.” Ultimately, anything that makes us more like God wants us to be – anything that prepares us for a home in heaven – is a good thing. Think!

— Via The Beacon, June 19, 2022
——————–

-3-

God’s Love for Us

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/God’s_Love_062622.mp4

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins. 
For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) “Jesus Christ is the Same” (Kyle Pope)
2) “Do To Others…” (Robert F. Turner)
3) The Importance of Good Fathers (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
4) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

“Jesus Christ is the Same”

Kyle Pope

Last month I turned a year older. This happens to all of us every year. Behind us are memories of joys, new beginnings, and achievements; but also losses, times of sadness and heartbreak. We cannot turn back the clock, nor should we waste our time wishing that we could. The wise man said it is foolish to ask, “Why were the former days better than these?” (Eccl. 7:10, NKJV). All the good things that have passed came with their own share of pain and hardship. As long as the Lord allows the world to stand, in the time that lies ahead there will be more of both good and bad in varying degrees. It is impossible to take the good and cause time to stand still so that it may endure longer. Every passing moment brings a new assortment of circumstances and situations that have never existed before, nor can ever be repeated. The Greek Philosopher Heraclitus compared this to a river. Just as we can never step into the same river twice, because the water that fills it at the moment we take each step flows on and never returns, so time is an ever-flowing and ever-changing stream. As he put it, “everything changes, and nothing stands still” (Plato, Cratylus 402a).

Heraclitus was right as it pertains to earthly things. Change is constant. The phone you buy today will be outdated before the year is over. The skill you learn to earn a living today will be modified and refined tomorrow and you will likely have to receive ongoing training. People whom you love and trust today will change and your role in their lives tomorrow will also change. Those who cared for you today may come to need your care tomorrow. Those who fill your life with joys today may no longer be there tomorrow. Relationships that shaped your view of your own life and family today may leave you empty tomorrow. Even the places and surroundings you consider constant today will change tomorrow. That restaurant you like today may close tomorrow. The park where your child plays today may become a parking lot tomorrow. Even the values and attitudes of the culture around us will change, until one day you may look around and feel like a stranger in your own hometown. This can be quite unsettling.

Heraclitus was a pagan. He did not know the god of the Bible. He lived 500 years before Jesus was even born. He could not know what we are now privileged to understand. The Hebrew writer made the simple and profound revelation, “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever” (Heb. 13:8). This does not mean that Jesus always does the same thing. In the beginning Jesus “was with God” and “was God” (John 1:1). It was not until He came to this world that He “became flesh and dwelt among us” (John 1:14). As God in the flesh He was “offered once to bear the sins of many” (Heb. 9:28a). Now as our High Priest, He is “at the right hand of God” and “makes intercession for us” (Rom. 8:34). One day for “those who eagerly wait for Him He will appear a second time, apart from sin, for salvation” (Heb. 9:28b). Even so, His Deity, His constituent nature, and His character have not changed.

The fact that Jesus is “the same” does not mean that His law for man has never changed. Before the Law of Moses was given God did not expect man to follow the laws it would reveal. That “law was given through Moses” (John 1:17). In it God “made known to them” all of the “precepts, statutes and laws, by the hand of Moses” (Neh. 9:14). But the Law of Moses foretold the coming of Christ as a “lawgiver” from the tribe of Judah (Gen. 49:10). Now, “in these last days” God “has spoken to us by His Son” (Heb. 1:2). Now, all are accountable to “the law of Christ” (Gal. 6:2) and all will be judged by His word (John 12:48).

While the revelation that, “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever” doesn’t mean His deeds or laws have not changed, it does offer us great comfort in the midst of this ever-changing world. It means. . .

1. No Matter How Much Everything Else Changes Around Us, God Remains the Same. A prayer written by Moses and included in the book of Psalms reads, “Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever You had formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, You are God” (Psa. 90:2). The changes that go on around us can easily make us forget the eternal nature of God. We can’t allow ourselves to think that advancing technology, modern tolerance of immorality, or increased knowledge of science, philosophy, or medicine has the power to change God. These tiny ripples in the flow of the stream of time that carries our brief lives is nothing to a God that has always been and will always be. “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.”

2. No Matter How Much People Around Us Change, We Can Count on Jesus.
People will let us down! Either because we unfairly place expectations on their behavior that we should not, or because by their own freewill people can and do choose to do things that are wrong. Sometimes we allow this to shake our faith, but the truth is if every human soul who has ever lived chose to reject the will of God and act with falsehood, sin, and rebellion it would not change in the slightest anything about God or the covenant He makes with His people. Jesus promised His disciples, “I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matt. 28:20). Even in a faithless world “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.”

3. No Matter How the World Changes, His Word Remains the Same.
Peter declared centuries ago, “The grass withers, and its flower falls away, but the word of the Lord endures forever” (1 Pet. 1:24b-25a). Centuries before Peter wrote, the Psalmist proclaimed, “Forever, O Lord, Your word is settled in heaven” (Psa. 119:89). Why do we imagine that changes in our thinking somehow changes what God has commanded? Why do we suppose that because His word was first revealed to people with no cars, computers, or airplanes it is somehow less relevant? The same eternal God who sent Jesus to die for our sins thousands of years ago, still offers salvation through the message of Christ’s coming. Nothing that changes around us can remove the demands that His word places upon our lives. “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.”

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 24, Issue 18, May 1, 2022
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-2-

“Do To Others…”

Robert F. Turner

The Lord gave me a yardstick by which to measure every relationship in my life. It is easy to understand, and easy to apply if I have the will to do so. It involves no complicated formula; it is with me every wakeful hour. Its strength is in direct proportion to my weakness; binding me with cords of my own weaving, or freeing me as I free my own heart. It comprehends my whole duty to man.

While yet a child I learned it as: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you;” but later I found it is properly stated: “All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets” (Matt. 7:12, see Luke 6:31).

“All things” is very broad. This includes my driving on the highway, selling a rifle, working for an employer, living with my wife, writing to my brethren, or about them.

“Whatsoever ye would” — is not “whatsoever they do.” This rule does not depend on the other fellow — it is determined in my own heart. How would I like to be treated? The rule is so reasonable, so unquestionably just, that it defies objection. It asks no pound of flesh, because its regulator would give none. It prescribes fair, honest treatment, because the party of the first part desires such. Self-interest, which so often blinds me to my duty to others, becomes the very indicator of those duties. God made the rule, but I am left to apply it — with the intensity gendered by man’s most powerful inner force, self-love. “No man ever yet hateth his own flesh; but nourisheth and cherisheth it…” (Eph. 5:29)

“Do ye even so –” Lenski comments: “what we would like to have men do to us, whether they do that to us or not, we are to keep doing (poieite, durative) to them.” Till seven times? Nay, but until seventy times seven. This regulates conduct, but it is far more than a law of “doing” — it is a basic principle of attitude, of underlying motive, which demonstrates itself in what we do.

“The law and the prophets” Jesus said; making it clear that this is no new rule, but one inherent in God’s will for man in all times. Further, this clearly relates the rule to the giver of law, emphasizing the external authority of God. Those who seek to limit the “whole duty of man” to humanitarian obligations seem to miss this all-important point. I Jn.3:14-f clearly relates our love for our fellow man with our prior love for God. Because He laid down His life for us, we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren. (Vs. 16) “And this is His commandment, that we should believe on the name of His Son Jesus Christ, and love one another, as he gave us commandment” (Vs. 23).

Christians are in a position to understand and apply the “Golden Rule,” as are none others. But the sad fact is that many so-called Christians make little practical application of this rule in their life, and seem a bit embarrassed if the preacher uses it as a text. Until we learn well the “second table of the law” (Matt.22: 39) we preach the “gospel” (?) in vain.

— Via The Beacon, June 12, 2022
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-3-

The Importance of Good Fathers

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Importance_of_Good_Fathers.mp4

——————–

-4-

News & Notes

The treatment for June Peters’ brain cancer has been discontinued. Please remember her and her husband Wayne in your prayers.

Sunny Nichols is now in rehab, following her recent stroke.

Danielle Bartlett, who is awaiting a kidney donor, also began having some heart complications recently.

Melotine Davis had a recent procedure that she has now healed from, but is also awaiting another that she has not yet been scheduled for.

Others to also keep in prayer: Rex Hadley,  Alex Cornelius, Rick Cuthbertson, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Donald Sears, Ronnie Davis, Jim Lively, Kayla Williams, Doyle Rittenhouse, Tammy Griffey, Deborah Medlock, Lois Fletcher, Vivian Foster, and Kim Rowell.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent
 of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)



The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Seeking God (Tim Jennings)
2) “Hellenist” Christians? (Wayne Goff)
3) Developing as a Christian (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
4) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

Seeking God

Tim Jennings

Knowing God is the essential pursuit of life. Now is time for the Lord to take his rightful place in our affections and be the object of our investigations. Now is time for God’s people to be captivated by the Lord’s infinite character and glorious works. “I want to know Him,” needs to be the ambition which makes all other pursuits insignificant (Phil. 3:8-10).

It may seem strange to suggest that Christians need to consider Christ. Yet, religion has always been a respectable place to ignore God. We are constantly tempted to enthrone our own feelings and pursue our own pleasures. We end up with Christless churches filled to the brim with disciples of religious celebrities.

Is that off the mark? Just look what happens when a little “crisis” arises. We splinter in a hundred directions! Why? Because we are more acquainted with our rights than God’s ways. A pursuit of the knowledge of God vaccinates us against the sickness of self-worship which lies under a thin veneer of religious justification.

I wonder, could our faith survive the transition the early church made from popularity to persecution (Acts 2-8)? Do we have the courage to share the gospel and start a church in a new city (Acts 8:4; 11:19-26)? Do we have the love to yield our rights to live in fellowship with others (1 Cor. 8:1-13)? Do we have the humility to serve someone vastly different from ourselves (Acts 6:1-7)? Or do we simply find a place we feel comfortable?

The solution to this Christless Christianity is to know the Lord. This is much more than knowing doctrines, traditions, and institutions. It is to launch into the inexhaustible journey to discover the nature of God.

This is possible because God made himself known to us. He placed his signature on Creation. He recorded his deeds and values in the Scripture. Ultimately, he modeled his ways in Jesus, “the exact imprint of his nature” (Heb. 1:3). God wants us to know Him!  So, he says, “Be still, and know that I am God” (Psalm 46:10).

To do this requires a reorientation of our reading of Scripture. The primary purpose of revelation is not human happiness or church policy, it is to know God (Ex. 20:1; John 1:18; 5:39; et al.)! His glory engulfs each story. His power is to be praised. His character is to be embraced.

This focus spills over into our hymns, prayers and preaching where we speak more of God than self! We do this until we recognize God is on his throne and we are on our knees. Only then will we be rightly directed by what he says and reflect who he is.

Jesus prayed, “this is eternal life, that they know you the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent” (John 17:3). Human movements often devolve from noble ideals into an arrogant struggle between personalities. The history of religion is no different. But rescue comes when we turn our eyes upward with a singular passion to know the Lord. This is the time to know Him!

Extra Bit:

At the base of Mount Sinai Israel thought they knew God. To them, God looked like a golden calf who was worshipped with bodily comfort, pleasure, and riches (Exodus 32). By the end of the day 3,000 died because their knowledge of God was corrupted. We laugh at their foolishness and sneer at their rebellion, but do we also mix our knowledge of God with tradition and cultural expectations?

Israel made their “god” out of gold and fashioned him with the glory of their talent and worshipped him with the pleasures of their flesh.

But Moses took a different approach. He asked the Lord, “Please show me your glory” (Exodus 33:18). What Moses wanted more than personal charisma and admiration from his peers was to know God.  He was richly rewarded.

5 The Lord descended in the cloud and stood with him there, and proclaimed the name of the Lord. 6 The Lord passed before him and proclaimed, “The Lord, the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, 7 keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation (Exodus 34:5-7).

Moses saw something more glorious than gold. He came to know God! The result: “Moses quickly bowed his head toward the earth and worshiped” (Exodus 34:8).  Israel worshiped the god of their own making and “rose up to play” (Exodus 32:6). Moses learned about the God of glory, and he “bowed down to worship.” The knowledge of God was so enlivening he continued to serve the stubborn people of God with a face that shined like the God he came to know.

— Via Focus Online, December 14, 2020

——————–

-2-

“Hellenist” Christians?

Wayne Goff

“Now in those days, when the number of the disciples was multiplying, there arose a complaint against the Hebrews by the Hellenists, because their widows were neglected in the daily distribution” (Acts 6:1).

The church at Jerusalem was comprised of “Hebrew” Christians and “Hellenist” Christians. Both were Jewish people, but there was a difference between the two. For whatever reason, the widows of the Hellenists were being ignored in the first church at Jerusalem, and that caused a conflict which was biblically resolved.

“Hellenist” Jews were those who were caught up in the cultural revolution of Alexander the Great and his Greek Empire when Greeks dominated the world. This Greek (Hellenist) influence continued through his Generals after his death, and even when Rome became the world power they continued the process of Hellenization.

So Hellenist Jews were those who began to speak the Greek language over the Hebrew language and worshiped God and read the Law of Moses in Greek. The Greek translation of the Old Testament, called “the Septuagint,” was made in Alexandria, Egypt around 250 B.C., so that shows you how wide-spread and lengthy this cultural transition was to the world at that time.

The “Hebrew” was the one who continued to speak the Hebrew language, worshiped God in the Hebrew tongue, and considered himself more loyal to God and the Law than the “Hellenists.” Paul references this in Philippians 3:5 when he lists his own Jewish “RESUME” —  “… a Hebrew of the Hebrews; concerning the law, a Pharisee.” Again you see this in 2 Corinthians 11:22 — “Are they Hebrews? So am I. Are they Israelites? So am I. Are they the seed of Abraham? So am I.” So you can see how this could cause problems in the Jerusalem church when Hebrew Christians and Hellenist Christians are joined together. But even a “Hebrew” like Paul could learn and speak the Greek language so long as he worshiped in Hebrew. Read also Acts 21:40—22:1-2 where Paul speaks to an angry mob in the Hebrew tongue.

The real problem existed when Jews began to imitate not only the manners and customs of the Greeks, but then began to worship the gods of the Greeks! That was taboo to both Jews and Christians in the first century, but it is typical of those who are more influenced by “society” than by “God and religion.”

— Via Roanridge Reader, Volume 37, Issue 21, Page 4, May 22, 2022

——————–

Psalm 138:6-8

“For though the LORD is high, he regards the lowly, but the haughty he knows from afar. Though I walk in the midst of trouble, you preserve my life; you stretch out your hand against the wrath of my enemies, and your right hand delivers me. The LORD will fulfill his purpose for me; your steadfast love, O LORD, endures forever. Do not forsake the work of your hands.”

— NASB

——————–

Developing as a Christian

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Developing_as_a_Christian.mp4

——————–

-3-

News & Notes

Folks to remember in prayer, due to their health:

Rex Hadley, June Peters, Lois Fletcher, Alex Cornelius, Rick Cuthbertson, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Danielle Bartlett, Donald Sears, Ronnie Davis, Jim Lively, Kayla Williams, Doyle Rittenhouse, Tammy Griffey, Deborah Medlock, Vivian Foster, and Kim Rowell.

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith
 in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized 
in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST

1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m. Bible Classes and 10 a.m. Worship Service.  We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

Wednesday: 7 p.m. for Bible Classes

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


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