Month: January 2022

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) Encouragement (Steven Harper)
2) News & Notes
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Encouragement

Steven Harper

 Previously, we considered the problem of discouragement, which [by definition] is depriving one of courage; this week, let us consider its opposite: encouragement. Encouragement, by definition, is to inspire with courage. It means to stimulate by assistance, approval, etc. It is, again, the opposite of discouragement and we can hopefully see which state is more preferable to the child of God, a disciple of Jesus Christ. And, we hopefully can see which we should be trying to do for others! Surely there are enough reasons for discouragement in this world without brethren adding to the problem; we need more brethren who are willing to do their part in encouragement.

In spiritual matters, encouragement might be heard more often as other terms: edification and exhortation. And on this, the Scriptures teach us some important points about the place of the necessary edification and exhortation and what we can do to be edifiers and exhorters, rather than those who discourage. As Christians, we are all striving to get to heaven and, while here on earth, do the things that are pleasing to God and abstain from the fleshly desires. But we also understand that the life of a disciple is not always easy. Sometimes we will get discouraged because things are a little harder than we may have first imagined; sometimes we are discouraged by the behavior of our brethren; sometimes we are discouraged by our own inability to live as we desire and we fail to attain our goals; and sometimes we just do not have enough information to be able to give difficult answers. It is then that we need our brethren to do their part in building us up in the faith and giving us the boost we need to continue as we should. But how is this to be done? Let us let the Scriptures tell us!

First, the Need. Last week, we addressed the erroneous idea that some have that discouragement should be absolutely foreign to the mind of a Christian — and, particularly, how it is an erroneous idea. The fact is, some brethren do get discouraged. Whether we want to admit it or not does not change the fact of the matter, and it would be utterly ridiculous to argue the matter if a brother in Christ told you that he was discouraged and you insisted he just couldn’t be because, well, Christians just don’t do that! [Meanwhile, he wallows in his state of discouragement while you are arguing over the very possibility.] And Scripture tells us that there is a need and, if there is a need, that means it does happen. Paul urged the Roman brethren to “pursue the things which make for peace and the things by which one may edify another” (Romans 14:19 ). Why worry about edifying if there is no need? The necessary implication is there is a need.

The writer of Hebrews — writing to the first-century Jewish Christians who had already suffered persecutions and who were contemplating abandoning the faith and making a return to following the Old Law — pointed to the great need of encouragement for those who were soul weary and discouraged by the fight in which they were involved. To them he wrote, “Therefore strengthen the hands which hang down, and the feeble knees, and make straight paths for your feet, so that what is lame may not be dislocated, but rather be healed” (Hebrews 12:12,13). More than ever, these brethren needed someone to encourage them to hang on and dig in and not abandon the faith by which they would be saved. There was a clear need, and to ignore it would have proved disastrous for those affected. Let us admit that there may be some today who face some difficult hurdles in their spiritual lives and who could use the encouraging words of those who have walked the same path. So, what words do we speak to them?

Point them to the Word of God. The apostle Paul, as he was about to depart from the Ephesian elders who had met him in Miletus, said, “So now, brethren, I commend you to God and to the word of His grace, which is able to build you up and give you an inheritance among all those who are sanctified” (Acts 20:32). After giving them a very serious charge to watch out for the souls of the brethren and to be alert to the “grievous wolves” who would soon enter into the flock, he pointed them to the answer for the coming dangers and that which would be the very source of encouragement to fight the good fight: the Word of God! Today, we have elders who — far too often — pick up the latest best-seller and the writings of popular “Christian” authors [who are not true followers of Christ at all] and give this to their flock as words of encouragement, rather than the Word of God. Why is this? Do we not trust that the divinely-inspired Word of God is sufficient? Is it that the leadership does not believe that God’s Word is “up to date” with our modern society? Has the Bible become irrelevant, at least in the minds of those who lead us? If so, that ought to tell us where the church will be heading in the near future — and it won’t be in the direction of heaven!

It is in the word of God that we read story after story of those who have walked the paths of faith and who have suffered greatly for their faith — and who have been crowned with eternal life as a reward. It is there that we read of faithful men who neared the end of their earthly life but who still looked forward — to the promised reward and of eternal life in heaven with the Savior (II Timothy 4:7, 8). It is there that we read of those who have unashamedly believed the promises of God and trusted Him enough to obey without question and who were rewarded with the praise of God and, now, the eternal rest (Hebrews 11). When brethren today need encouragement, there could be no greater source than God’s Word. Don’t overlook the positive influence it may have on those who are weary and heavy-laden, and who seek the rest for their souls.

Remind them they can do it. When anyone is feeling overwhelmed or feels like they cannot, by themselves, deal with the pressures they face, we should remind them that — as a Christian — they can do it. When the apostle Paul was in prison because of his faith, he wrote to the brethren to encourage them to “stand fast” in the faith (Philippians 1:27) and considered even that his own imprisonment was a positive thing (Philippians 1:14). He was right! [Read Philippians 1:13 and then Philippians 4:22; some of the palace guard must have been convinced and converted by Paul while they guarded him!] But in this letter to the Philippian brethren, he could say with all certainty, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me” (Philippians 4:13). We would do well to remember that, too, and we would do much good if we reminded the ones who are discouraged. What words of encouragement — to hear that we can do all things!

Or is it that we really do not believe those words? Why would we allow someone to dwell in their state of discouragement when we have such potentially-powerful words? Why not speak those words and build them up in the faith instead of letting them wallow in discouragement? If an imprisoned man who faced the possibility of death for his faith can find encouragement in those words, how about you?

Step in and lend a hand. If you remember, part of the definition of encouragement is to stimulate by assistance. In other words, you can encourage someone by simply lending a hand! Remember Elijah, when he felt like “he alone was left” in all Israel? Remember the words of God, how He told Elijah that he was not alone? And what if good old Barnabas [whose name means “son of encouragement”] had never stepped in to speak up on behalf of Saul (Acts 9:26, 27)? Today, when we feel discouraged because we feel like we are overwhelmed with the work of God or just life, in general, it does immeasurable good when someone steps up and says, “Here, let me help you.” Sometimes, all we need to hear is that someone is there and that someone cares.

Will you be that one?

— Via Articles from the La Vista church of Christ
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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:  

Rick Cuthbertson, as he is on new medication and receiving 5-hour infusions every 3 weeks as treatments for the cancer that has increased on his lung.

Lois Fletcher, who has been receiving homeopathic treatments for bone cancer.

Ronnie Davis, who has now been on new medication, along with continual oxygen for a few weeks, due to an illness not yet determined. 

Deborah Medlock,
whose excessive coughing and nausea might be due to a nodule in her throat.

Tammy Griffey, who still needs to keep weight off her foot as her ankle heels, over the next few months, from the surgery performed on it.

Danielle Bartlett, as she continues with home dialysis and awaits a donor kidney.

Let us also be remembering in prayer Jim Lively, Rex Hadley, Vivian Foster, Kayla Williams, and Kim Rowell.
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized
 in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service. 

We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) More on the Genealogies of Genesis 5 and 11 (Tom Edwards)
2) Good and Important Things to Remember! (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
3) News & Notes
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More on the Genealogies of Genesis 5 and 11

Tom Edwards

Recently, in The Gospel Observer for January 9, we could easily figure out the year of birth for each of those mentioned in the genealogies of Genesis 5 and 11, from the birth of Seth (Adam’s son) all the way up to the birth of Abram (Abraham). And rather than those years being in the B.C., they were shown instead as the years that had elapsed since God created Adam on that 6th day of creation (Gen. 1:26-31). So we looked forward from the beginning of time to the events mentioned.

One of our intents in that article was to answer the question if anyone mentioned by name in the book of Genesis had died in the flood. And we saw the answer to be “no.” For Noah’s father Lamech had passed away about 5 years before the flood; and though Methuselah lived to the same year as the flood, yet the Bible does not say whether he died in it or before it. And concerning all the others listed in the genealogical chart we had in that article, they each passed away prior to the year of the flood — with just the exception of Noah, his sons, and their wives living on past that time (though the wives are not mentioned in Genesis 5 or 11).

In that article, we also wanted to determine from the Scriptures how many years it was from the creation of Adam to the birth of Abraham, which is the name God gave him when 99 years of age (Gen. 17:1,5).  For while “Abram” means “high father” (James W. Strong) or “exalted father” (Brown-Driver-Briggs), “Abraham” means “father of a multitude or chief of a multitude” (ibid.).  God gave Abram that name in going along with the promise He had also given him in the same verse: “No longer shall your name be called Abram, But your name shall be Abraham; For I have made you the father of a multitude of nations” (v. 5).

We saw that the year of birth in that chart for each individual is based on the age of the father when the son was born to him, in addition with the years up to that. So by the time of Abram’s birth, who was the 20th generation from Adam, it was about the year 2009.

But keep in mind, too, that in the Jewish reckoning of time, a part of a year could be considered an entire year. So if that is also done with the ages in these genealogies of 19 fathers, then the year of Abram’s birth would actually be somewhat less than 2009. But even then, it would not be much of a difference.  For if we would deduct 1 year from each of the father’s ages when they became a father to the son mentioned, it would take it down to 1990 for the time of Abram’s birth.  And if we would then randomly add some months to each of the 19 fathers for a total of 91 months, that would then be an additional 7.58 years; and which would bring the time of Abram’s birth up to about 1998.  So we can round that off to an even 2000 to better remember.  (NOTE: In randomly adding those months, after deleting one year to each of the father’s ages, it does not make much of a difference.  For even if we added just 1 month to each (for a total of 1.58 years), that would take the 1990 up to about the middle of 1992.  Or if we added 11 months to each of the fathers’ ages (for a total of 17.42 years), that would then take 1990 up to almost the middle of 2008.  So only about a 16-year difference in the extremes; but it is not likely that all of them had either been born in the first month of the year or the last.  So the difference would be even less.  

One change I made for the online version of that bulletin is in putting the birth of Arpachshad at 1659 – instead of 1658 (based on the years the Bible shows); and then also adding a year to each of his descendants up to Abram. For though the flood began about 1656 (in the 2nd month, 17th day) — and it rained for 40 days and 40 nights (Gen. 7:12) — yet it took a little more than a year for the earth to become completely dried from the flood about 1657 (in the 2nd month, 27th day) (cf. Gen. 7:11 with Gen 8:13-14). So since Arpachshad was born 2 years after the flood (Gen. 11:10), that takes it up to about 1659.

Let me also say, however, that the year 1659 is based on the age the Bible shows for each father when his son was born and also knowing that the flood began in the 600th year of Noah’s life (Gen. 7:11). But if those ages are based on the way the Hebrews would consider even part of a year as a whole year, as mentioned above, then 1650 would be a better estimate (and easier to remember) for the time that the flood began. 

Concerning those mentioned in the genealogies of Genesis 5 and 11, some might raise the question, “Well, what about Luke’s genealogy?” For there we see — instead of Arpachshad being the father of Shelah, and Shelah being the father of Eber (Gen. 11:12-14) – that Arphaxad (a different spelling) is seen as the father of Cainan, and Cainan being the father of Shelah (Luke 3:35-36).

It is thought that the reason for this difference is that the passage in Luke was based on the Septuagint (the Greek version of the Old Testament). For it says in Genesis 11:12-14: “And Arphaxad lived a hundred and thirty-five years, and begot Cainan . . . And Cainan lived a hundred and thirty years and begot Sala . . . And Sala lived an hundred and thirty years and begot Heber” (Brenton’s English Septuagint).

But in the 53 different Bible translations I looked up Genesis 11:12, only 2 of them mentioned Arpachshad becoming the father of Cainan. All the rest show it as Arpachshad becoming the father of “Shelah” (or some other spelling of that name). And those two translations that differed from all the rest are Brenton’s English Septuagint, as cited above, and the International Standard Version (which is not the same as the New International Version).

Also in Genesis 10:24, the ISV has it as “Arpachshad fathered Cainan, Cainan fathered Shelah, and Shelah fathered Eber.” And Brenton’s English Septuagint also has that same order.

But, ironically, in 1 Chronicles 1:18, the ISV says, “Arpachshad fathered Shelah and Shelah fathered Eber.” And even Brenton’s English Septuagint has the order of “Arpaxad” being the father of Sala (Shelah), and Sala being the father of Eber.

And that was also the order in all of the 53 Bible translations I looked that verse up in: For it was always Arpachshad, Shelah, then Eber (though sometimes with different spellings of those names).

Though it has been said that there are some gaps in the Bible’s genealogies, yet this does not appear to be the case of Genesis 5 and 11, where we read of Adam/Seth, Seth/Enosh, Enosh/Kenan, Kenan/Mahalalel, Mahalalel/Jared, etc.

In the chart in the bulletin a couple weeks ago, Enoch (not to be confused with “Enosh”) is seen as being the 7th generation from Adam and being born 622 years after the creation of Adam (which is based on the ages given in the genealogy of Genesis 5).  And Jude, the half-brother of Jesus Christ, also shows that to be so by speaking of Enoch in Jude 1:14 as being “in the seventh generation from Adam” (NASB).

But even if one of these in Genesis 5 would actually be a grandfather rather than the father, that still would not change the time up to Abram’s birth. For suppose, for instance, that Seth was the grandfather of Enosh (not to be confused with “Enoch”) – and not the father. Yet we are then still given the years from the grandfather (if he would be that) to the grandson’s birth. As Genesis 5:6 says, “Seth lived one hundred and five years, and became the father of Enosh.” So, for example, what if Seth were the grandfather, and the real father of Enosh was a guy named Elihu? And say Elihu became the father to Enosh when 52. Yet that would not even need to be factored in. For it would not change the years from the time Enosh was born in relation to his grandfather (if he had been his grandfather) when he was 105. In other words, we are not missing any years in our timeline by that.

So the years mentioned for the births and the time of the flood in last week’s bulletin give us a good idea of when all that happened. And as mentioned, those years are not in B.C.; but, rather, the years after God had created Adam and made him from the dust of the earth – and that was on the 6th day of creation, as the Bible shows (Gen. 1:26-31).

And for those who believe the earth to be about 4.5 billion years old, and with man not having “evolved” until about 2 million years ago, hear what Jesus, our Creator says, in Mark 10:6 with regard to the man and the woman in marriage: “But from the beginning of creation, God MADE THEM MALE AND FEMALE” (NASB, emphasis mine).

As we have been going back to the very beginning of time to then give our attention to the lineage of Bible characters from Adam to Abraham, who made up that family tree, yet we realize that the most important family for all of us to be a part of is the family of God!  For even to those sinners who could trace their lineage back to Abraham, yet there was still a need for them to be born again (cf. John 3:3-5).  And that is so we may all become a part of the family of God, and eventually enter in to heaven itself where there will be no more time as we know it; but, instead, one great, blissful eternity for all to enjoy the endless blessings of God!  And right now this goes way beyond all we can even imagine (cf. Eph. 3:20; Matt. 19:26; Jer. 32:27, 17; Rev. 21:4; 1 Cor. 15:21-32).  So be wise and become a child of God while you have the time and opportunity! And how that is done can be seen below in “The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation.”
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Good and Important Things to Remember!

Tom Edwards

To play the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Memory.mp4
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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Rick Cuthbertson, Lois Fletcher, Ronnie Davis, Jim Lively, Tammy Griffey, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Deborah Medlock, Danielle Bartlett, Vivian Foster, Kayla Williams, and Kim Rowell    
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service. 

We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) How Can I Deal With Worry, Anxiety? (Hoyt H. Houchen)
2) How Can I Help This Church? (Jarrod M. Jacobs)
3) Truth is Essential (Bill Lambert)
4) Looking For Jesus (part 2, video sermon, Tom Edwards)
5) News & Notes
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How Can I Deal With Worry, Anxiety?

Hoyt H. Houchen

Worry is a common problem and no doubt a reason that the Scriptures say so much about it. For example, Jesus taught in Matthew 6:31, “Be not therefore anxious, saying, What shall we eat? or, What shall we drink? or, Wherewith shall we be clothed? For after all these things do the Gentiles seek; for your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of these things.” This is the conclusion of what Jesus had said in the previous verses about worry, or anxiety. He had shown his disciples that they should trust in God and not uncertainty. The principle is that God will provide the necessities of life if we will place confidence in him. The problem with most of us is that we give more attention to the everyday physical necessities such as food, clothing and shelter than to spiritual matters. Our Lord climaxed his teaching on worry, or anxiety, when he said: “But seek ye first his kingdom, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you” (v. 33).

Paul admonished his brethren at Philippi: “In nothing be anxious; but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God. And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall guard your hearts and your thoughts in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:7-8).

How do we cope with worry? How do we overcome it? Both in the teaching of Jesus in Matthew 6 and that of Paul in Philippians 4:6-7 is the solution to worry. It is trust God. Most of us make God powerless by supposing that he is not capable of ruling his universe. We take life’s situations into our own hands and forget that God has promised to supply our needs.

The basic cause of worry is a lack of faith in the promises of God — a failure to trust God. Our lack of faith results from not studying the word of God which supplies faith. “Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:17).

When we trust God we will take our burdens to him in prayer. Hear Paul again: “In nothing be anxious; but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God” (Philippians 4:6). The idea is to let the things we seek be made known to God. Thanksgiving should accompany our requests — not only for the many blessings which our Heavenly Father has already bestowed upon us, but for the very privilege of being able to make our requests known. He is “able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think” (Ephesians 3:20).

We all need to stop this foolishness of worrying ourselves into nervous wrecks and remember that God is on his throne; he is capable of running his affairs; he is always accessible and he never becomes weary from our requests. When we trust in God and believe his precious promises, we will go to him in prayer. This relieves us of worry, thus giving us “the peace of God, which passeth all understanding” (Philippians 4:7). In place of being ruled by fear, worry and anxiety, our hearts and our thoughts will be guarded by “the peace of God.” This peace is another of the great promises which God will keep, if we will but trust him. Jesus told his apostles: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be fearful” (John 14:27).

Let us trust God, go to Him in prayer and believe that his promises are true. It is only when we do these things that we can deal with worry, anxiety.   

— Via Viewpoint, December 26, 2021
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How Can I Help This Church?

Jarrod M. Jacobs

Regardless of our age, people want to feel useful. This is true whether we’re talking about a 2 or 3-year-old who wants to “help” Daddy or an 80 or 90-year-old who knows he or she can “do something.” While we see much apathy in the church, there are also many who would love to help in the Lord’s work but do not know where to start. For these people, I offer these suggestions.

1. Pray that God’s word will be preached boldly and heard by honest hearers (James 5:16; Acts 4:29b; 2 Thess. 3:1).

2. Invite someone who needs to hear the gospel and be saved (John 1:40-42, 45-46).

3. Attend each and every service of the Lord’s people (Heb. 10:25; Matt. 6:33).

4. Encourage others in words of concern, singing, praying, and studying the Bible (1 Thess. 5:11, 14-15; 2 Tim. 4:2; Col. 3:16).

5. Greet visitors warmly, and let them know you’re happy they are here today (Matt. 7:12; 1 Cor. 13:4).

6. Glorify God by obeying His will (Heb. 5:9; John 14:15).

—  Via Articles from the Knollwood church of Christ, January 2022
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Truth is Essential

Bill Lambert

John 8:31-32: “Then said Jesus to those Jews which believed on him, If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.”

The world needs the truth, but there are precious few who are willing to hear the truth. Why is this?  Because the truth is many times painful.  People would rather “put off” facing the truth in order to continue their lives without the pain of making changes. Facing the truth will mean facing the need to make those changes. This is the “moment of truth” which we have heard about all our lives.  It is when one must make a decision to accept the truth and act upon it, or ignore the truth and suffer the consequences. Jesus said that the truth will make one free, but this is only if one accepts the truth. Many, unwilling to accept the truth, will continue in their ungodliness.

In John 5:39-40, Jesus said to his audience of Jews, “Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me. And ye will not come to me, that ye might have life.”  He likened them to chickens which could find refuge under the wings of their mother. “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, thou that killest the prophets, and stonest them which are sent unto thee, how often would I have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not!” (Matt 23:37)

Had they been willing to accept the truth that Jesus was the Son of God, they would have had life — but they would not. As Peter said to the Lord one time, “…thou hast the words of eternal life” (John 6:68).  By refusing him, they had, as those Jews who rejected their preaching judged themselves unworthy of eternal life.  (cf. Acts 13:46).

What is your attitude when your habits, lifestyle, beliefs, etc. are exposed to the light of truth?  You cannot simply say, “I don’t agree that such is wrong.”  That will not make it right — even if you could find a million people to agree with you!  The truth is still the truth, even if it is ignored or denied.

— Via Articles from the Eastside church of Christ, Athens, AL
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Looking For Jesus (part 2)

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, which is also the conclusion of last week’s sermon, just click on the following link:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Looking_For_Jesus_2.mp4

(This has been adapted from a sermon by Joe R. Price.)

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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Let us continue to remember in prayer the family and friends of Howard Moore who passed away January 19.

Rick Cuthbertson’s recent scan indicates that the cancer on his lung has grown, so he was put on new medication. He will also have a pet scan tomorrow to see if the cancer has spread.  On Thursday, he will then begin a 5-hour infusion, which he will have every 3 weeks.

A.J. and Pat Joyner have both been ill, plus A.J. has also torn some ligaments in his arm.

Deborah Medlock will be seeing her ENT doctor Thursday to determine if the nodule in her throat has been causing some of her recent trouble.

Florence Lester, who had been born with a bad heart, recently received a heart valve replacement.  All went well. 

The heart surgery for Jerald Hunter, due to some clogged arteries, also went well.

Rebekah Rittenhouse and her son Michael are both now over the coronavirus, and her husband Michael is now better from his double pneumonia and strep throat.

Tammy Griffey has also now healed from covid-19, but still has a few months to go for her foot to heal from the recent surgery she had on it. 

Marie Pennock is doing better, but still recovering from the coronavirus.

Danielle Bartlett has also healed from covid-19 and has been continuing her dialysis at home, while she awaits a donor kidney.

Ronnie Davis is still needing to stay on oxygen. His health problem has not yet been determined, but he was recently given a new medication.

Let us also be remembering in prayer Jim Lively, Myrna Jordan, Rex Hadley, Vivian Foster, Kayla Williams, and Kim Rowell.

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service. 

We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————-

Contents:

1) Jesus’ Resurrection (Frank Himmel)
2) Did Anyone Mentioned by Name in Genesis Die in the Flood? (Tom Edwards)
3) Looking For Jesus (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
4) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

Jesus’ Resurrection

Frank Himmel

When the Jews asked Jesus for a sign after He drove out the moneychangers from the temple, He replied, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up” (John 2:19). He was speaking of His resurrection (vv. 21-22).

When some scribes and Pharisees insisted on a sign in addition to the many miracles Jesus had already done, He told them, “An evil and adulterous generation craves for a sign; and yet no sign shall be given to it but the sign of Jonah the prophet; for just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the sea monster, so shall the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth” (Matthew 12:29-40).

Jesus depicted His love for our souls as a good shepherd who lays down His life for the sheep. “For this reason the Father loves Me, because I lay down My life that I may take it up again. No one has taken it away from Me, but I lay it down on My own initiative. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again” (John 10:17-18).

In these and many other references Jesus spoke of His resurrection from the dead. It was the ultimate proof that He was who He claimed to be (Romans 1:4). It was the ultimate proof of the Father’s approval of Him (Acts 3:13-15). It is our assurance that His atonement for us was accepted (1 Peter 3:18-22). It is the very basis of our hope (1 Corinthians 15:12-19). It is the proof that He will one day judge us (Acts 17:31). Indeed, Jesus’ resurrection is the cornerstone of Christianity.

Salvation in a crucified and resurrected Christ was the message the apostles preached. They were eyewitnesses (Acts 1:8). They did not see Him emerge from the tomb, but they did see Him frequently afterward (Acts 1:3-8). In fact, apostleship required that one could give eyewitness testimony of the risen Lord (Acts 1:22).

How can we know that Jesus did indeed rise from the dead? First, there is the empty tomb. Resurrection is the only explanation of it that fits all the facts. Theories about mistaken identity, a moved or stolen body, or a planned resurrection hoax are not supported by the evidence.

The inability of Jesus’ enemies to produce any counterevidence also testifies to the reality of the resurrection. They bribed the tomb guards to lie about what happened (Matthew 28:11-15). Yet they could do nothing to stop the story that Jesus had risen. It is interesting that some time after the event, Gamaliel, a leader among the opponents of Christianity, had to admit the possibility that it was genuine (Acts 5:38-39).

Jesus’ bodily appearances following His resurrection prove its reality (1 Corinthians 15:3-11). Many people saw Him—on one occasion He appeared to a crowd of over 500! He ate and drank with the disciples to prove that it was no spirit they were seeing. He invited Thomas to examine His body to verify that it was He (John 20:26-29).

The changed character of the apostles evidences the resurrection. Prior to it, Peter was cowardly (Luke 22:54-62). He and the others met behind locked doors out of fear (John 20:19). But afterward they boldly defied the Sanhedrin’s order that they not preach the resurrection (Acts 4:18-21; 5:27-32). The apostles suffered because of their testimony, yet none ever recanted it.

The events of Pentecost proved Jesus’ resurrection. The apostles spoke in tongues when the Spirit was poured out (Acts 2:1-4). That fulfilled Joel’s prophecy, which meant it was the last days. That, in turn, meant Jesus had taken His place on the throne. “Therefore having been exalted to the right hand of God, and having received from the Father the promise of the Holy Spirit, He has poured forth this which you both see and hear” (Acts 2:33).

The Lord’s church, the Lord’s day, the Lord’s Supper, baptism—these by their very existence and significance testify in their own way of the resurrection of the Christ.

Salvation is available only in the risen Christ (Acts 4:10-12). It requires that we believe that God raised Him from the dead and confess Him as Lord (Romans 10:9-10). The believer is then immersed into Jesus’ death and raised with Him to a new life (Romans 6:3-4). Are you alive with Christ?

— Via Pathlights, November 28, 2021
——————–

Jesus said to Martha, “I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in Me will live even if he dies” (John 11:25, NASB).

——————–

-2-

Did Anyone Mentioned by Name in Genesis Die in the Flood?

Tom Edwards

Some folks might wonder if any of the individuals listed by name in the Bible, who were born prior to the flood — such as Jared, Methuselah, and Lamech (Noah’s father) — had also died in that flood.

We can solve that by using the genealogy in Genesis 5. 

NOTE: The year a person was born, in the following chart, is neither B.C. nor A.D.  Rather, it is from the time when the Lord first created Adam on that 6th day of creation (Gen. 1:26-31) to the number of years to each person’s birth. 

PersonBorn
Died
Years Lived
Seth
130
1042
912
Enosh
235
1140
905
Kenan
325
1235
910
Mahalalel
395
1290
895
Jared
460
1422
962
Enoch
622
987
365
Methuselah
687
1656
969
Lamech
874
1651
777
Noah
1056
2006
950

Though the number of years that Noah lived is not seen in Genesis 5, yet it is shown in Genesis 9:29 as 950 years.

As we see on the chart, Methuselah, the grandfather of Noah, was born 687 years after the Lord had formed Adam from the dust of the earth.  And since Methuselah lived 969 years, he passed away in the year 1656.

With that in mind, the Bible shows that it was in the 600th year of Noah’s life when the flood came (Gen. 7:11).  So adding that to 1056 (the year of Noah’s birth), we see that the year of the flood was 1656 — the same year that Methuselah died!

The Bible, however, does not tell us if Methuselah died before the flood or in it.

But, surely, there must have been many of Noah’s relatives that had perished in that great deluge.  For it says of his father Lamech, who died about 5 years before the flood, that “he had other sons and daughters” (Gen. 5:30).

And what about the “other sons and daughters” of Methuselah (Gen. 5:26) — Noah’s uncles and aunts.  And, therefore, probably also many cousins and other relatives as well who drowned.

So we do not find anyone specifically named who had died in the flood, but all who were in the world at that time had perished — except for Noah, his 3 sons, and their wives.

And from those 8, the lineage of Seth lived on.

Let us now continue up to the time of Abraham’s birth:

Two years after the flood, Shem was 100 years old and became the father of Arpachshad (Gen. 11:10). And though the rain had been for 40 days and 40 nights (Gen. 7:12), yet the flood itself lasted for slightly more than a year. So we will add that to the 2 years after the flood when Arpachshad was born and continue with our figuring with Genesis 11 for the year each of the following was born:

1659 – Arpachshad
1694 – Shelah (v. 12)
1724 – Eber (v. 14)
1758 – Peleg (v. 16)
1788 – Reu (v. 18)
1820 – Serug (v. 20)
1850 – Nahor (v. 22)
1879 – Terah (v. 24)
2009 – Abram (based on 205 when Terah died in Haran, Gen. 11:32; and the age of Abram [75] when that happened, Gen. 12:4.  So 205-75 = 130.  130+1879 = 2009)

——————– 

-3-

Looking For Jesus

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, just click on the following link while on the Internet:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Looking_For_Jesus.mp4
——————–

-4-

News & Notes

We extend our condolences to the family and friends of Kathy Todd (Bob Waldron’s sister) who passed away January 4.

Lois Fletcher (the wife of Jim Lively’s nephew Mike) has been diagnosed with bone cancer in her chest wall and is receiving homeopathic treatment, since she is severely allergic to chemical medications.

Rebekah Rittenhouse has tested positive for the coronavirus and is having some bad symptoms. Her son also has it, but milder. And while her husband Michael tested negative, yet he has been sick with double pneumonia and strep throat. 

Tammy Griffey is doing better, but still not completely over the virus.  She is now back home, quarantined with her husband Richard.

Though feeling a loss of energy, Danielle Bartlett was released from the hospital Wednesday and will be able to continue her dialysis at home. 

Marie Pennock, taking longer to recover than the others, is still having some difficulty from the coronavirus. 

Deborah Medlock is also improving from the coronavirus and will be tested again this week. Her niece, and her nieces two children also have it.

All others that had previously been mentioned with it are doing well: Danny & Jan Bartlett, Doug Pennock, Richard Griffey, and Mikaela Jones.

Ronnie Davis is still having to be on oxygen.  The cause has not yet been determined, but he will be seeing his doctor again on the 19th.

Let us also be remembering in prayer:  the family and friends of Ron Montero; and Rick Cuthbertson, Jim Lively, Rex Hadley, Vivian Foster, Kayla Williams, and Kim Rowell.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe 
in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent 
of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith 
in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized
 in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith
by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service. 

We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Raising Lazarus (Frank Himmel)
2) Numbers, Life and Death (Bill Crews)
3) New Year’s Resolutions (Johnie Edwards)
4) Saved Like Noah (video sermon, Tom Edwards)
5) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

Raising Lazarus

Frank Himmel

Jesus’ miracles were signs, indicators of who He was. He said to skeptics, “If I do not do the works of My Father, do not believe Me; but if I do them, though you do not believe Me, believe the works, that you may know and understand that the Father is in Me, and I am in the Father” (John 10:37-38). No miracle better made the point than the resurrection of Lazarus (John 11:1-53).

Jesus was in Perea when He received word that Lazarus was sick. He responded, “This sickness is not unto death, but for the glory of God; that the Son of God may be glorified by it” (vs. 4). Lazarus would indeed die, but his death would not be the primary result of this sickness; Jesus’ glorification would be. How so? First, raising Lazarus would be a dramatic proof of Jesus’ deity. Second, this incident would trigger the official plotting of His own death. That, along with His subsequent resurrection and ascension, was Jesus’ crowning glory (cf. 7:39; 12:23).

Jesus delayed two days before leaving to go to Bethany where Lazarus lived. That had the effect of ensuring Lazarus’s death (he had been dead four days by the time Jesus arrived).

Lazarus’s sister Martha went out to meet Jesus, opining that had the Lord been there Lazarus would not have died. Jesus assured her that Lazarus would rise again. Martha believed that but thought only of the final resurrection. Jesus said, “I am the resurrection and the life” (v. 24). Earlier He affirmed that the Father had entrusted to Him life and judgment (John 5:21-29), prerogatives He possessed because of who He was. Martha readily confessed her faith in Him as the Son of God, yet she was slow to see these implications of His identity.

Lazarus’s other sister, Mary, then came out to meet Jesus, accompanied by a crowd of mourners. Together they all made their way to the tomb. Jesus ordered, “Remove the stone.” Martha, evidently thinking Jesus only wished to see the body, objected. The Lord reassured her. He then prayed aloud. He wanted all present to know that what was about to happen was done in conjunction with the Father, “so that they may believe that You sent Me” (v. 42). And with that He cried with a loud voice, “Lazarus, come forth.” He did, still bound in his burial wrappings.

Many who saw the miracle believed. Some reported it to the Pharisees. In their own words the Jewish rulers’ dilemma was, “This man is performing many signs. If we let Him go on like this, all men will believe in Him” (v. 47), and the rulers would lose their place. Something had to be done. Never mind the reality of Jesus’ signs. Never mind that they unmistakably verified His identity. Caiaphas, the high priest, put it bluntly: Jesus had to die. Ironically, these enemies of Jesus were setting the stage for His greatest miracle. Additionally, by their behavior they were bringing on themselves the very destruction they sought to avert. No one can escape the truth about Jesus.

— Via Pathlights, November 14, 2021
——————–

-2-

Numbers, Life and Death

Bill Crews

43, 54, 85, 50, 63, 57, 71, 65, 65, 68, 25, 93, 37, 47, 49, 58, 64, 16, 19, 91 and 81. Can you guess the source or significance of this collection of numbers? Each one is very much the number of a person. Each one represents the number of birthdays celebrated by an individual. Each one describes in years the life span of a real human being. They came from the obituary section of a Monday morning paper. These were the ages of the deceased. From 16 to 93! An average of 57!  I grant that that average is below the life expectancies of both men and women, then and now, but they demonstrate well the fact that anyone can die at any age.

In view of the brevity and uncertainty of life, the certainty and finality of death, and the duration and nature of eternity (one heaven and one hell, forever), shouldn’t you start thinking about the condition and destiny of your soul — NOW? You are concerned about your mortal body; shouldn’t you be even more concerned about your immortal soul? You are concerned about your physical life; shouldn’t you be more concerned about your spiritual life? Your are concerned about material things; shouldn’t you be more concerned about spiritual things? You are concerned about time; shouldn’t you be more concerned about eternity?

Every day that we live among men, we are asked, “How are you?” or “How are you feeling?” Hardly anyone asks, “How’s your soul?” We are body-conscious; we have physical health-awareness. But we are being foolish and careless if we are not primarily concerned about the spiritual condition of our never-ending souls. Have you been saved from your sins? Are you a Christian? Are you faithful to God? Do you have the approval of God? Do you enjoy the life and peace and hope that are in Christ? In the words of a grand old song:

“A charge to keep I have,   
A God to glorify;
A never-dying soul to save,
And fit it for the sky.

— Via Roanridge Reader, Volume 36, Issue 52, Page 1, December 26, 2021
——————–

-3-

New Year’s Resolutions

Johnie Edwards

With the coming of a new year comes those new year’s resolutions! Many are made only soon to be broken. This time of year does serve a good purpose of considering some spiritual resolutions which would be good for all of us to make and keep.

No Longer to Linger. The song, I Am Resolved serves as a reminder of some good resolutions. If you have not become a Christian, it is a good time to resolve to become one and quit lingering. Don’t be charmed by the world’s delight. Be aware there are things that are nobler. So a good question is: “What wait I for?” (Ps. 9:7).

To Go To The Savior. All of us would do well to go to the Lord at this time of the year as well as rest of the year. One reason for going to Him is because He “has the words of eternal life…” (Jn. 6:68). As one goes to Christ, he leaves his sins as they are remitted at baptism (Acts 2:38). As Jesus is the “saviour of the body, the church…” (Eph. 5:23; Col. 1:24); you will be “added to the church” (Acts 2:47).

To Follow Jesus. Since Jesus is the living way, we are instructed to follow Him. Peter declared, “For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps” (1 Pet. 2:21).

To Enter The Kingdom. There is no greater resolution than that of being a citizen in the kingdom of God. The kingdom often has reference to the Lord’s church (Mt. 16:18-19). We enter the kingdom by being “born of water and the Spirit” (Jn. 3:3-5). This takes place when one is “baptized into Christ” (Gal. 3:27).

To Be More Faithful. The Lord’s people are described as “stewards,” and they must “be found faithful” (1 Cor. 4:1). A lot of church members choose not to be counted faithful. If we expect the Lord to say, “Well done,” we must “be faithful” (Mt. 25:21). Do you need to make a resolution on this count?

To Be The Best Example. There is a great demand for some good example setting! Fellow workers need it, our children need it, and other church members need it. After all, we must “shine as lights in the world” (Mt. 5:14-16; Phil. 2:15). May each of us plan to be the best example as folks “read our epistle” (2 Cor. 3:2).

Don’t forget to keep your resolutions!

— Via Back To Basics, Volume 6, Number 1, January 2008
——————–

-4-

Saved Like Noah

Tom Edwards

For the video sermon with the above title, which has been adapted from a sermon outline made by Johnie Edwards many years ago, just click on the following link while on the Internet:

https://thomastedwards.com/wordpress/Saved_Like_Noah.mp4

——————–

-5-

News & Notes

Folks who are ill with the coronavirus: Danny, Jan, and Danielle Bartlett; Doug and Marie Pennock; Richard and Tammy Griffey; Deborah Medlock; and Mikaela Jones.  

The worst of the virus is over for Doug and Marie. They are getting better.

For Richard, the virus has been like a cold; and similar for Danny.  So the symptoms have not been too severe for any of these.

Ronnie and Melotine Davis have also been ill, but “hanging in there,” as Melotine told me.

Danielle is still in the hospital with pneumonia, and her coronavirus is also mild.    

Let us also be remembering in prayer:  the family and friends of Ron Montero; and Rick Cuthbertson, Jim Lively, Rex Hadley, Vivian Foster, Kayla Williams, and Kim Rowell.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).

2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ, the Son of God (John 8:24; John 3:18).

3) Repent of sins.  For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).  For whether the sin seems great or small, there will still be the same penalty for either (Matt. 12:36-37; 2 Cor. 5:10) — and even for a lie (Rev. 21:8).

4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).

5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; 1 Pet. 3:21).  This is the final step that puts one into Christ (Gal. 3:26-27).  For from that baptism, one is then raised as a new creature (2 Cor. 5:17), having all sins forgiven and beginning a new life as a Christian (Rom. 6:3-4). For the one being baptized does so “through faith in the working of God” (Col. 2:12). In other words, believing that God will keep His word and forgive after one submits to these necessary steps. And now as a Christian, we then need to…

6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

Sunday: 9 a.m.
Bible Class and 10 a.m. Worship Service. 
We also have a Song Service at 5 p.m. for every first Sunday of the month.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com

https://thomastedwards.com/go/all.htm/ (This is a link to the older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990.)


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