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The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) The Role of Faith (Bill Crews)
2) The People of God (Mike Richardson)
3) Our Duty Toward Truth (Dan Richardson)
4) News & Notes
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The Role of Faith

Bill Crews

Heaven’s recipe for eternal life demands the ingredient, faith — a faith that comes from hearing God’s revelation (Romans 10:17); a faith that is living, active, growing, abiding, unfeigned, unwavering and obedient. “Faith is assurance of things hoped for, a conviction of things not seen” (Hebrews 11:1) In fact, “we walk by faith, not by sight” (2 Corinthians 5:7).

Jesus said to Thomas, who was unwilling to accept the reliable testimony of the other apostles that they had seen the risen Jesus and who had to be convinced by the Lord Himself, “Because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed” (John 20:29). Ours is not a groundless faith. It is built upon testimony and other evidence of the highest sort. At the same time, ours must not be a halfhearted or half-way faith. It must not be adulterated by human doubts, wisdom or reservations.

We believe that God is, and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him (Hebrews 11:6). “By faith we understand that the worlds have been framed by the word of God, so that what is seen hath not been made out of things which appear” (Hebrews 11:3). We believe that God is the Creator of man, that the Bible is the word of God, and that Jesus is the Son of God — we believe that He was miraculously born of a virgin, lived a sinless life, taught His Father’s words and did His Father’s works, died for our redemption, was raised from the dead, ascended to the right hand of God, and will come again to raise the dead and to judge all the living and the dead. We believe that we have a God to glorify, a Christ to serve, a never-ending soul to save, a hell to avoid and a heaven to seek though we have seen none of these. It is faith — unfeigned, great, rich and perfected; not weak, little, barren or dead — that leads us into Christ and directs us on to heaven’s gates.

Before one can enter Christ in baptism, he must believe with all his heart (Acts 8:36-37). To draw near unto God, he must have a true heart in fulness of faith (Hebrews 10:22). Like Abraham, he must not “waver through unbelief, but wax(ed) strong through faith, giving glory to God” (Romans 4:20). He will not be “of them that shrink back unto perdition, but of them that have faith unto the saving of the soul” (Hebrews 10:39). His faith will grow exceedingly (2 Thessalonians 1:3); it will serve as a shield to quench all the fiery darts of Satan (Ephesians 6:16); it is the victory that will overcome the world (1 John 5:4-5). His faith will serve to resist transgressions and to guide in the pathway of righteousness. Will you please take time to read 2 Corinthians 4:16 — 5:1 and see if it describes your faith?

— Via Roanridge Reader, Volume 35, Issue 36, page 2, September 6, 2020
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The People of God

Mike Richardson

There are many great lessons that we can learn from the pen of the apostle Peter.  When one examines the writing of this man we find many truths in regard to the people of God. For just a moment of your time notice I Peter 2:10 where Peter wrote “who once were not a people but are now the people of God, who had not obtained mercy but now have obtained mercy.” Observe that Peter speaks about the people of God in these few words.  There are some things for us to observe from this passage.

Observe first, they were at one time not the people of God.

As we look at their past history we see that at one time they were not the people of God. This was indeed a sad position for them to be in. They were separated from God and not in fellowship with God.  The apostle believes it is good for them to remember what they were in order to really appreciate what they are now.  The writers of God’s word often bring to the minds of the people what they had been in days gone by.  Many of us need to stop and recall what we used to be in order that we might really appreciate what we are now.

Observe secondly, their present position.

They are now the people of God. That is they belong to the family of God, they have been adopted into the spiritual family of God. They make up what Peter described in verse 9 as a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a peculiar people.  What a contrast to what they were to what they are now in Christ.  They were not the people of God, now they are the people of God; and in this there are many blessings.  We should all be grateful that we are the children of God.  Let us not forget that it is God that made this possible.  Let us also remember that when we were baptized into Christ we had the view of being the people of God.  We should never neglect to be thankful that by the amazing grace of God we can become the people of God.

Observe thirdly, their purpose as the people of God.

Just what is their purpose in this life as they are now identified as the people of God? Has their purpose changed from when they were not the people of God?   Yes, for now they are to show forth the praises of Him that called them out of darkness (I Pet. 2:9).  They are to offer spiritual sacrifices unto God as is revealed in I Peter 2:5.   I wonder in our day do we realize our purpose in life as the people of God.   I am convinced that if more Christians did realize their true purpose as the people of God then more people would be brought to the Lord.

Observe fourthly, their destination.

The fourth and final thing to remember about the people of God is their final destination.  Turn to the writing of Paul in the Philippian letter chapter 1:21-25.  Paul said it is better to be with Christ.  The people of God long to live with their Father in heaven and to live for  Him now.  This is the hope we now have as Paul stated in Titus 1:2.  Now observe this great truth from I John 3:1-2: “Behold what manner of love the Father has bestowed on us, that we should be called children of God! Therefore the world does not know us, because it did not know Him. Beloved, now we are children of God; and it has not yet been revealed what we shall be, but we know that when He is revealed, we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is.”  As the people of God we long for the day we shall see Christ and be with Him forever, but don’t miss the blessing we have now.  John said NOW we are the children of God.  That is why when we pray we can address God as our Father.  Are you now a child of God?

— Via Lakeview church of Christ, October 30, 2016
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Our Duty Toward Truth

Dan Richardson

WE MUST LOVE THE TRUTH (2 Thess. 2:10). Before truth can have a positive effect upon one’s life, he must have a love for the truth that he might be saved. This will insure that our motives in approaching God our pure and that we are able to discern truth from error (John 7:17). Those who do not have a love for the truth will be deceived by Satan’s lies and perish (2 Thess. 2:10).

WE MUST KNOW THE TRUTH (Jn. 8:32; 1 Tim. 2:4). God’s word is truth (Psa. 119:142; Jn. 17:17), and He has revealed His truth for man’s good (Deut. 29:29). Therefore, unless one would believe God to be cruel and malicious, we must accept that God’s word can be understood and known by all who desire such knowledge (Eph. 3:3-4; 5:17). Jesus said “ye shall know the truth” (Jn. 8:32). God desires that “all men … come to the knowledge of the truth” (1 Tim. 2:4).

WE MUST BELIEVE THE TRUTH (2 Thess. 2:12-13). Believing God is not a blind leap in the dark. His truth is a presentation of evidence designed to bring men to belief (Jn. 20:30-31). Each individual is responsible to weigh the evidence, determine it credible and conclude it believable. Those who disbelieve do so because they do not choose to consider the evidence properly (if at all). Instead, they have pleasure in unrighteousness.

WE MUST OBEY THE TRUTH (Gal. 5:7; 1 Pet. 1:22). Because God has given commands, His truth demands an obedient response on our part. Truth is not a spiritual smorgasbord of options for us to pick and choose from. The sum of God’s word is truth (Psa. 119:151, 160). Everything He has revealed on a subject constitutes the pattern to be obeyed (Rom. 6:17). Therefore, we are responsible to “handle aright the word of truth” (2 Tim. 2:15). To neglect just one part of it constitutes sin by which one will perish eternally (James 2:10).

WE MUST WALK IN TRUTH (2 John 4; 3 John 3-4). This Bible reference to “walk” has reference to one’s manner of life. The righteous will incorporate God’s truth into his life and walk therein.  Whatever the circumstance, he will not compromise it (Prov. 23:23). It will be a “shield and a buckler” for he who takes refuge in God (Psa. 91:4). And, it will be the standard by which he worships God (John 4:23-24).

– Via The Beacon, August 9, 2020
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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Shirley Crews
remains in critical condition.  Her family was allowed to stay with her in the hospital all day Saturday until late that night.  Earlier, she was going to be transferred to Savannah, but that was cancelled after her condition worsened.

Max Beach
had his quadruple bypass Tuesday. Though he had been having trouble with his oxygen level, it improved yesterday.

Judy Daugherty is doing well in physical therapy for her shoulder.  She will be in rehab for a total of 6 weeks.

Rick Cuthbertson has been able to continue with his radiation treatments and has just one more week of it — taking 2 pills a day.

Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother has been having elevated blood pressure for about a week. So he had to resume some medication and will be seeing his doctor Friday.

Doyle Rittenhouse continues to be in much pain in his lower back and legs. On Wednesday he received an anti-inflammatory shot from his primary doctor, but to no avail.  Doyle then saw his spine and pain doctor on Thursday who told him that his back is all inflamed from the shots.  So he was put on Mobic and will see his doctors again in 2 weeks.   

Martha Lively is still seeing a chiropractor every week for her sciatic pain, but she does continue to improve.

Jim Lively has not had any additional falls lately, but he is still unsteady on his feet.

Deborah Medlock will be seeing her doctor this week to find out the treatment she will soon begin.

Others to also be praying for: the family and friends of William Martin Connor Sr. and John Henry Cole, Larry & Janice Hood, Jamie Cates, A.J. & Pat Joyner, Elaine Abbott, Allen & Darlene Tanner, Shirley Davis, Pat Brigman,  Ronnie & Melotine Davis, James Medlock, Tim Kirkland, Rex & Frankie Hadley,Cameron Haney, and Ginger Ann Montero.
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel — for that is how faith comes (Romans 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins. For every accountable person has sinned (Romans 3:23; Romans 3:10), which causes one to be spiritually dead (Ephesians 2:1) and separated from God (Isaiah 59:1-2; Romans 6:23). Therefore, repentance of sin is necessary (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Romans 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; Acts 22:16; Romans 6:3-4; Galatians 3:26-27; Colossians 2:12; 1 Peter 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith by living for the Lord. For, if not, salvation can be lost (Matthew 24:13; Hebrews 10:36-39; Revelation 2:10; 2 Peter 2:20-22; James 5:19-20).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
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Contents:

1) “Delivered Up By the Determined Counsel of God” (Kyle Pope)
2) The Good Shepherd and His Sheep (R.J. Evans)
3) News & Notes
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“Delivered Up By the Determined Counsel of God”

Kyle Pope

In Peter’s sermon on Pentecost, a profound declaration of the providence and predetermination of God is set forth. The death of Jesus was not a victory of darkness over light. It did not take Deity by surprise nor thwart Divine intentions. It had, in fact, taken place “by the determined purpose and foreknowledge of God” (Acts 2:23, NKJV). The word horizo in Greek, translated “determined” (NKJV), “determinate” (KJV, ASV) or “predetermined” (NASB), came from a word meaning “boundary.” In the Greek Old Testament (LXX) horizo often referred to the literal marking off of boundaries (Num 34:6; Jos 13:27; 15:12; 18:20). When used of time, as it often is in the New Testament, it refers to the marking off of a boundary of time that might be set for a person or thing. The event or duty thus marked off did not occur by chance, but in the realization of the purpose of the one who set the boundaries of time to begin with.

Jesus was “ordained (horizo) by God to be judge of the living and the dead” (Acts 10:42). God has “appointed a day on which He will judge the world in righteousness by the Man whom He has ordained (horizo) (Acts 17:31). Jesus stated that the manner of His death would occur “as it has been determined (horizo)(Luke 22:22). The resurrection of Christ “declared (horizo) the Son of  God with power” (Rom. 1:4, NASB).*

Peter asserts that Jesus’ death was something that God in eternity past, looked down the path of time and established the boundary point at which it would occur. Long before we ever started, in our own lives to think about our accountability to God, He was thinking about the horrible and yet wonderful plan whereby He could redeem us from our sins by the Lamb without spot and blemish. John speaks of Jesus as the “Lamb slain from the foundation of the world” (Rev 13:8). This is hard for us to fathom. Our entire existence occurs within the finite limits of our short lives. We see our lives, or Jesus’ death, as something that occurs at one point on the timeline. “The Lord does not see as man sees” (1 Sam 16:7). Even before our creation, before our sin, before our alienation from God, He determined how we could be reconciled back to Him by Jesus’ death. No action of man, nor angel, nor demon could have altered this.

The word rendered “foreknowledge” in Peter’s assertion has come directly into English with a different application: prognosis. A doctor, upon examination of a patient, will give his best prediction regarding how an illness will progress or diminish with the prescribed treatment. Unlike the limited abilities of a human physician, God can in all things issue an infallible prognosis. God is He whom Isaiah speaks of as “declaring the end from the beginning, And from ancient times things that are not yet done, Saying, ‘My counsel shall stand, And I will do all My pleasure’” (Isaiah 46:10).

If God determined from the beginning that Jesus would die, does that mean that God killed Jesus? The control of Deity over His creation is two-fold. In a broad sense anything that happens only happens because He allows it to. Not a bird falls to the ground (Matt 10:29), not a single soul lives on for a moment (James 4:15) apart from the permissive will of God. Yet allowing something is not the same as carrying it out of one’s self. In Acts 2:23, God “delivered up” (ASV, NASB) Jesus, yet “the hands of godless [or “lawless” NKJV, ASV] men…put Him to death” (NASB). God was obviously neither “godless” nor “lawless.” On the contrary, in this act of predetermination, God used the “godless” for His own purposes. The infinite mind of God, knowing the freewill choices of men, used the deeds of the godly and the godless to accomplish His purposes. So although He determined that it would happen, He does not bear the guilt of carrying it out. He is “just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus” (Rom 3:26).

When Peter spoke these words, his motive was clear. Those who perhaps only days before shouted “crucify Him, crucify Him!” had to recognize their error. They had killed God’s anointed! Many recognizing this were “cut to the heart” (Acts 2:37) and obeyed the gospel. Yet Peter was also calling on them to recognize how this fulfilled the eternal purpose of God to offer redemption to man and purchase a people unto Himself. This people, the church, Paul says was also a part of God’s “eternal purpose which He accomplished in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Eph 3:11). We, like those on Pentecost, can choose to be a part of God’s eternal purpose.

_______________

* Here horizo might be thought of as setting the boundary markers that identified to the world that Jesus was the Son of God. The resurrection did not make Jesus something He wasn’t before (i.e. the Son of God). Rather it indicated this truth to man.

— Via Faithful Sayings, July 4, 2010, Issue 12.27
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The Good Shepherd and His  Sheep

R.J. Evans

In reflecting back over my life, about the closest association I have ever had with sheep is that we owned two sheep dogs—Border Collies (smile!).  However, in studying the Bible, we learn much about shepherds and sheep.  It was a way of life for the people in Bible times.  Immediately, we think of King David, who spent his time as a young man caring for sheep.  He wrote that wonderful, meaningful twenty-third Psalm.

Being a shepherd and making reference to sheep was a vital part of Jesus’ teachings while here on earth.  He depicts Himself as the Good Shepherd, elders as shepherds, and His followers as sheep.  Do you ever wonder why the Lord compares us to sheep?  There must be reasons why He did so.  Not that I speak from experience or as an authority, by any means, but there are sound and obvious reasons why we find this analogy in Scripture.  In fact, research concerning their characteristics should cause us to give some serious thought about the direction of our lives.  Please consider the following:

1.  Sheep have no sense of direction.  Some will say sheep are “dumb,” but let’s just say—no sense of direction.  They will follow whoever is leading them, even if it leads to their falling off a cliff.  (And there are cases where this has actually happened.)  This reminds us of Isaiah 53:6: “All we like sheep have gone astray; We have turned, every one, to his own way.”

2.  Sheep are defenseless.  They don’t know how to defend themselves well, but they have been known to kick when protecting their young.  They don’t bark, growl, bite, or show their teeth.  They usually just run away. That’s why, as sheep, we need God’s protection.  We need the Good Shepherd because our “adversary, the devil, walks about like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour”  (1 Pet. 5:8).

3.  Sheep can’t get up without help when they are lying flat on their back.  They will be on their backs with their legs in the air flailing.  There is an old English shepherd’s term for this— “cast down.”  This is when the shepherd must come in and lift up the sheep and put it back on its feet.  God “will gather the lambs in His arm, and carry them in His bosom, and gently lead those who are with young” (Isa. 40:11).

 4.  Sheep will recognize the shepherd’s voice.  This is where stupidity ends for sheep—they have a remarkable instinct for knowing the voice of the shepherd.  Jesus said, “My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me” (Jn. 10:27; 10:1-5).

5.  Sheep are not meant to carry heavy burdens.  You will never see a sheep carrying a pack on its back.  They are not meant to carry heavy loads.  This is part of the reason God compares us to sheep.  He will carry our burdens.  “Casting all your care upon Him, for He cares for you….Cast your burden on the Lord, And He shall sustain you; He shall never permit the righteous to be moved”  (1 Pet. 5:7; Psa. 55:22).

 6.  Sheep are valuable.  They provide meat, milk, and wool.  Jesus, the Chief Shepherd, is precious and of great value, beyond comparison.  When John the Baptist saw Jesus, he said, “Behold!  The Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world!” (Jn. 1:29).

 7.  Sheep cannot care for themselves when wounded.  They need the shepherd to tend to their injuries.  We need the blood of the Lamb to take away our sins.  “By His stripes we are healed….He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds”  (Isa. 53:5; Psa. 147:3).

 8.  There is a sense of innocence with sheep.  We sometimes use the expression— “Innocent as a lamb.”  In the Bible, sheep often represent purity and innocence. Think of all the Old Testament sheep sacrifices which were a type of Jesus, the Lamb of God, who would be sacrificed to take away our sins (Heb. 10:1-10).  There is a sense in which we are to be innocent as sheep—pure and righteous, made possible by the blood of the Lamb in our gospel obedience and by walking in the light of the truth of His Word (Rom. 6:3; 1 Jn. 1:7-9).  When Jesus returns to judge the individuals of all nations, “He will separate them from one another, as a shepherd divides his sheep from the goats.” The goats “…will go away into everlasting punishment” but the sheep or “righteous into eternal life” (Matt. 25:31-46).

 Just like sheep, we cannot make it alone without the Good Shepherd.  Let us run to Him in gospel obedience, and let Him lead us to the spring of living water and take care of us forever.  “For the Lamb who is in the midst of the throne will shepherd them and lead them to living fountains of waters.  And God will wipe away every tear from their eyes” (Rev. 7:17).

 — Via the bulletin for the Southside church of Christ (Gonzales, Louisiana), September 15, 2019
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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Our condolences to, and prayers for, the family and friends of William Martin Connor, Sr. (Darlene Tanner’s father) who passed away Thursday (Sept. 3). He was 86.

Shirley Crews has now been three weeks on life support at the hospital. She is also in an induced coma and has received about 4 fusions for her covid-19, but there has been no improvement. 

Max Beach (Jim Lively’s brother-in-law) had a heart attack Friday and is now in the hospital where he will have a quadruple bypass in which each artery has almost 100% blockage.  The surgery might be tomorrow.

Judy Daugherty was admitted to the rehab facility the middle of last week and has begun her 6 weeks of treatment. Though it is painful, she is getting better. 

Alan and Darlene Tanner have both tested positive for covid-19.

Shirley Davis was given wrappings on her legs last week to help eliminate the fluid buildup. They extend from her knees to her toes and are changed every week by an in-home nurse.  One of the wrappings for this 3-week treatment is medicated. Shirley says that she is already noticing an improvement.  The swelling has gone down some, and her coughing is not as frequent as before.  She will also be having a checkup with her doctor on the 10th of this month.

Cameron Haney is going through illness and some difficult times.

Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother‘s blood pressure has been on the high side the last couple days, which with his recent heart surgery and still a future surgery to do on it, is higher than his doctors want. 

Though Doyle Rittenhouse had 8 nerve endings of the spine deadened recently, he is still with continual pain.  In 2 weeks, he will again see his doctor to find out his next step, which might finally be the spinal procedure that uses spacers to take care of the spur on his spine that has been causing the pain.

Susanne Rittenhouse, is now healed from her covid-19.

Martha Lively continues to improve from her sciatica.  Though she is still aware of it, yet she is now “much better.”  Her husband Jim is about the same with his condition.

So far, Rick Cuthbertson is doing well in resuming his cancer treatments in pill form, which is 2 a day for 2 more weeks.

Ronnie & Melotine Davis are both improving in their health, but not totally better yet.

Deborah Medlock has another week to go before seeing her doctor again to find out what treatment she will begin as a precautionary measure, following her recent surgery.

We are glad to say that Marie Pennock is now over her illness and feeling much better.

Others to also be praying for: the family and friends of John Henry Cole, Larry & Janice Hood, Jamie Cates (healing from a double lung transplant), A.J. & Pat Joyner, Elaine Abbott, Pat Brigman,  Ronnie & Melotine Davis, James Medlock, Tim Kirkland, Rex & Frankie Hadley, and Ginger Ann Montero.
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The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
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Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Love Your Neighbor (Frank Himmel)
2) “Ready For Every Good Deed” (Heath Rogers)
3) Just As Christ Loved The Church (Al Diestelkamp)
4) News & Notes
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Love Your Neighbor

Frank Himmel

What does it mean to love your neighbor? Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) points to helping the needy, yet that is only the beginning. romans 13:9 says that all the commandments relating to how we treat others are summed up in the saying, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”  Galatians 5:14 concurs.

Drawing just one entry from most of the New Testament letters, here is a sampling of what loving our neighbor requires.

► “Never pay back evil for evil to anyone. Respect what is right in the sight of all men. If possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men” (Romans 12:17-18).

► “Let no one seek his own good, but that of his neighbor. . . .just as I also please all men in all things, not seeking my own profit but the profit of the many, so that they may be saved” (1 Corinthians 10:24,33)

► “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction so that we will be able to comfort those who are in any affliction with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God” (2 Corinthians 1:3-4).

► “Brethren, even if anyone is caught in any trespass, you who are spiritual, restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness; each one looking to yourself, so that you too will not be tempted” (Galatians 6:1).

► “Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you” (Ephesians 4:31-32).

► “Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit, but with humility of mind regard one another as more important than yourselves; do not merely look out for your own interests, but also for the interests of others” (Philippians 2:3-4).

► “Let your speech always be with grace, as though seasoned with salt, so that you will know how you should respond to each person” (Colossians 4:6).

► “. . . Make it your ambition to lead a quiet life and attend to your own business and work with your hands, just as we commanded you, so that you will behave properly toward outsiders and not be in any need” (1 Thessalonians 4:11-12).

► “But as for you, brethren, do not grow weary of doing good” (2 Thessalonians 3:13).

► “First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings, be made on behalf of all men, for kings and for all who are in authority, so that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and dignity” (1 Timothy 2:1-2).

► “The Lord’s bond-servant must not be quarrelsome, but be kind to all, able to teach, patient when wronged, with gentleness correcting those who are in opposition, if perhaps God may grant them repentance leading to the knowledge of the truth” (2 Timothy 2:24-25).

► “Remind them to be subject to rulers, to authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good deed, to malign no one, to be peaceable, gentle, showing every consideration for all men” (Titus 3:1-2).

► “But encourage one another day after day, as long as it is still called ‘Today,’ so that none of you will be hardened by the deceitfulness of sin” (Hebrews 3:13).

► “My brethren, do not hold your faith in our glorious Lord Jesus Christ with an attitude of personal favoritism. . . .But if you show partiality, you are committing sin and are convicted by the law as transgressors” (James 2:9).

► “Beloved, I urge you as aliens and strangers to abstain from fleshly lusts which wage war against the soul. Keep your behavior excellent among the Gentiles, so that in the thing in which they slander you as evildoers, they may because of your good deeds, as they observe them, glorify God in the day of visitation” (1 Peter 2:11-12).

► “But whoever has the world’s goods, and sees his brother in need and closes his heart against him, how does the love of God abide in him? Little children, let us not love with word or with tongue, but in deed and truth” (1 John 3:17-18).

► “And have mercy on some, who are doubting; save others, snatching them out of the fire; and on some have mercy with fear, hating even the garment polluted by the flesh” (Jude 22-23).

Doubtless you are thinking of other verses not included in this brief survey.

Luke 6:31 sums it all up well: “Treat others the same way you want them to treat you.”

— Via PathLights, August 23, 2020
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“Ready For Every Good Deed”

Heath Rogers

The apostle Paul told Titus to “remind them to be subject to rulers, to authorities, to be obedient, to be ready for every good deed” (Titus 3:1). There are several reasons why you and I need to be ready for every good deed.

1. There is a shortage both of good works and of people who do them. There are plenty of people doing bad things. This world has been characterized by sin and evil since the fall of man in the Garden of Eden. There is always a need for good people who will do good deeds. If we do not perform the good works God has prepared for us to do (Eph. 2:10), who will?

2. If we aren’t ready, we won’t see the opportunities to do good works. How many times have opportunities passed us by because we weren’t prepared? Some people excuse their lack of involvement by saying, “I don’t know how,” or, “I never have the opportunity.” The opportunities exist, we just have to find them. Paul asked the Colossians to pray “for us as well, that God may open up to us a door for the word, so that we may speak forth the mystery of Christ, for which I have also been imprisoned” (Col. 4:3).

3. Readiness is a state of mind. Christians are to live in a watchful, alert state. Jesus said, “Therefore be on the alert, for you do not know which day your Lord is coming. But be sure of this, that if the head of the house had known at what time of the night the thief was coming, he would have been on the alert and would not have allowed his house to be broken into. For this reason you be ready too; for the Son of Man is coming at an hour when you do not think He will” (Matt. 24:42-44). We are to be on the alert always, not only for the Lord’s return, but also for opportunities to do good.

Are you and I ready for every good deed? 

— Via Knollwood church of Christ, April 2019
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Just As Christ Loved The Church

Al Diestelkamp

For men who are married, I doubt that there is any greater challenge than the one posed by the apostle Paul in his letter to the Ephesians: “Husbands, love your wives just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for it” (5:25). Loving our wives is easy, but loving them “just as Christ loved the church” sets a very high standard. Therefore, it is important that we see just how Christ loved the church so that we might act accordingly toward our wives.

Christ Loved the Church Sacrificially

He “gave Himself for it.” To succeed at loving our wives “as Christ does the church,” we must have an attitude of sacrificial service toward them. It’s not likely that we will have to die for our wives, but we must be willing to serve their needs. As husbands, we need to understand that our wives’ needs differ from our own. True love “does not seek its own” (1 Cor. 13:5). It is our responsibility to meet the needs of our wives. A great “fringe benefit” of doing this well is that our wives will respond in kind by making sure that our needs are met. While not all wives have identical needs, a survey of Christians attending a ladies’ Bible class showed that their number one need is for their husbands to provide spiritual leadership. Other expressed needs (in order of their importance) were family commitment, communication, affection, and financial security.

Christ Loved the Church Exclusively

The apostle says that Christ’s gift of Himself was “that He might sanctify and cleanse it” (v. 26). Though Jesus loves the whole world, He has “set apart” His church from the world. He has only one bride. The marriage relationship requires sanctification—a setting apart from other relationships. In marriage, the husband is “set apart” to belong to the wife, and the wife is “set apart’ to belong to the husband—he for her; her for him. Any interference with this God-given arrangement is sin.

Christ Loved the Church Caringly

“So husbands ought to love their own wives as their own bodies; he who loves his wife loves himself. For no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, just as the Lord does the church” (vs. 28-29). The word nourish means “to feed,” and the word cherish means “to soften by heat” [Vine].  I think we know what we do for someone or something we cherish—“protect and care for lovingly; hold something dear” [American Dictionary].

Christ Loved the Church Enduringly

As the church is joined to Christ, so “a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh” (v. 31). This is a reference to the intimate sexual relationship between a husband and wife. However, Jesus used this same quote to teach the inseparability of marriage (Matt. 19:5-6). As Christ and His bride are “one body” which nothing can separate (Rom. 8:35-39), so the husband and wife are “one flesh” which man must not separate.

From the beginning, God said, “it is not good that man should be alone; I will make him a helper comparable to him” (Gen. 2:18). As men, we should have a great appreciation for our wives. We should view them as highly-prized (and nicely packaged) gifts from our Creator. He knows just what we need to help us go to Heaven.

— Via Think On These Things, April-May-June 2019
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-4-

News & Notes


Folks to be praying for:

We extend our condolences to all the family and friends of John Henry Cole (of Vernon, Alabama, and the biological father of Tina Allen).

Alan and Darlene Tanner have both tested positive for covid-19.

Michael Rittenhouse
, who had covid-19, is now doing 100% better!  He will be going back to work Monday.  “Little Michael,” who tested negative, will be going back to school Monday; and his mother Rebecca (who has recovered from covid-19) will also be going back to work Monday.

Taylor Wright and his pregnant wife Sarah have also both recovered from covid-19, and their unborn baby is doing fine as well.

Susanne Rittenhouse, who tested positive for covid-19 on Monday, is at home getting better.

Shirley Crews is still on life support at the hospital.  They have put her in an induced coma and also began doing fusions for her covid-19.

Martha Lively mentioned that she had a couple bad days last week with her sciatica — but for the most part, she is doing better.  Her chiropractor, whom she will see again this Tuesday, has been helping.

Judy Daugherty’s broken shoulder turned out to be worst than what was first thought.  So surgery was performed on it Thursday, which went well.  She will be moved to a rehab facility today, where she will be for 6 weeks.

Cameron Haney is going through illness and some difficult times.

Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother will not be seeing his doctor until the first week in November to determine what the next step for him will be.  In the meanwhile, they continue to keep his blood pressure low.

Doyle Rittenhouse had 4 ablations of nerve endings on the other side of his spine Thursday, for a total of 8 in two weeks.  The Toradol shot (anti-inflammatory) gave him some relief, but sciatic pain began bothering him Friday evening, due to a spur on the spine he has had for some time.  He will be seeing a doctor this Wednesday to find out what his next treatment will be.   

Rick Cuthbertson has now resumed his cancer treatments in pill form, after having to temporarily discontinue them (due to adverse reactions).  He is now taking 2 pills a day and will continue to do so for 21 days. 

Marie Pennock started not feeling well yesterday.

Ronnie & Melotine Davis are both improving in their health, but not totally better yet.

Deborah Medlock will be seeing her doctor in a couple weeks, after the results of her biopsy-reassessment will be in, to better determine the next step for precautionary treatments. She will also be seeing her surgeon this Tuesday to have her surgical strips removed.

James Medlock is now a permanent resident at the nursing home where he receives continual therapy.

Penny Medlock is doing well in the group home.

Others to also be praying for: Larry & Janice Hood, Jamie Cates (healing from a double lung transplant), A.J. & Pat Joyner, Elaine Abbott, Pat Brigman,  Shirley Davis, Tim Kirkland, Rex & Frankie Hadley, and Ginger Ann Montero.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Jesus Is My Lord and My God (Kyle Pope)
2) Why So Few Study the Bible (Bill Crews)
3) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

Jesus is My Lord and My God

Kyle Pope

There is perhaps no other biblical book that places more emphasis on the picture of Jesus as God in the flesh than the gospel of John. In its opening words John affirms boldly what he calls “the Word” that was “in the beginning”—“with God” and “was God” (John 1:1). We are not left to wonder for long the identity of that which is called “the Word.” Only a few verses into the text John explains through the Holy Spirit, “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14, NKJV). The rest of the gospel tells the story of this personified “Word” of God—Jesus Christ.

 Before we leave the opening chapter we have already learned a number of things about Jesus as the “Word of God.” First, He is the Creator: “All things were made through Him, and without Him nothing was made that was made” (John 1:3). The Bible begins with the declaration, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” (Gen. 1:1). If Jesus (as the “Word of God”) is said to have made “all things,” the clear assertion is that Jesus is God. Next, Jesus is described as existing within “the bosom” of God the Father. John explains, “No one has seen God at any time. The only begotten Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, He has declared Him” (John 1:18). Some translations have taken this figuratively in just the sense “at the Father’s side” (NIV, ESV, HCSB), but that may miss the point. In Scripture to speak of something in the bosom of another person is a way of describing something as belonging to the person or sharing a unique intimacy with him or her (cf. Gen. 16:5; Exod. 4:6; Deut. 13:6; 28:56; Ruth 4:16; 2 Sam. 12:3; Job 31:33; Psa. 35:13; Prov. 6:27; Luke 6:38). While it can refer to those maintaining separate identity (cf. Luke 16:22; John 13:23), in the context this is likely an affirmation of Jesus’ unity with God the Father. Jesus would say later, “I am in the Father, and the Father in Me” (John 14:10). While Jesus may be described as “standing at the right hand of God” (Acts 7:55-56), the Bible also clearly describes the Deity of Christ.

This is clear in other statements Jesus makes throughout the gospel. He affirmed to Nicodemus while on the earth that although He “came down from heaven,” He was also “in heaven” (John 3:13). On a separate occasion when speaking to the Jews in Jerusalem He declared, “I am not alone, but I am with the Father who sent Me” (John 8:16; cf. 16:32). Only God may be said to “fill heaven and earth” (Jer. 23:24). 

When Jesus was criticized for healing on the Sabbath He declared, “My Father has been working until now and I have been working” (John 5:17). The clear inference of this statement was that Jesus had been working from the beginning, just as God the Father had. John explains that the Jews understood that by saying God was His Father they considered Him to be “making Himself equal to God” (John 5:18). How interesting that John felt no compulsion to explain that Jesus was not equal to God! Why? Because John understood their conclusion to be correct!

In the same context Jesus affirmed His power to call forth the resurrection on the last day (John 5:21, 25-26) and proclaim judgment (John 5:22). Later, Jesus would declare that His words would judge all people on the “last day” (John 12:48). In fact in this gospel, Jesus was said to “know what was in man” (John 2:25). Only God knows the thoughts of man (Acts 15:8), and the Bible teaches that only God is the “judge of all the earth” (Gen. 18:25). If Jesus is the Judge, Jesus is God!

Jesus claimed to be “from above” (John 8:23) and on another occasion “from the Father” as One who had “seen the Father”—yet in the same verse He declared that no one else had “seen the Father” (John 6:46). In this He claimed a status for Himself different from all other human beings.

Perhaps one of the most striking declarations Jesus made came in a discussion with the Jews about Abraham. As Jesus affirmed that they did not display the character and attitude of Abraham, they questioned His claim to know Abraham’s attributes. Jesus declared, “before Abraham was, I AM” (John 8:58). With this statement, Jesus used the very words by which God had told Moses to identify Him to the children of Israel—“And God said to Moses, ‘I AM WHO I AM.’ And He said, ‘Thus you shall say to the children of Israel, “I AM has sent me to you”’” (Exod. 3:14). By identifying Himself as “I AM” Jesus deliberately demonstrated His Deity. This was clear to the Jewish leaders. They picked up stones to stone Him (John 8:59).

Jesus declared His power to resurrect Himself after His death (John 10:17-18), and yet the Bible teaches it is “God who raises the dead” (2 Cor. 1:9) and even concerning Jesus that “God raised Him from the dead” (Acts 13:30). Clearly, Jesus and New Testament writers are affirming Christ’s Deity.

Jesus said it quite simply in His declaration, “I and My Father are one” (John 10:30). The Bible doesn’t teach three Gods, but Jesus is a part (or person) of the One God of the Bible. While He possesses distinct will (cf. Matt. 26:39), as do all persons of the godhead (cf. John 16:13), He is One God with the Father, and Holy Spirit. When Jesus said this, once again they tried to stone Him, “because You, being a Man make Yourself God” (John 10:33). Isn’t it interesting that once again, nether John (nor Jesus) feel compelled to explain—No, Jesus isn’t God! What Jesus did was refer them to the scriptural use of the word for God in application to human judges (John 10:34-35; cf. Psa. 82:6). Why wouldn’t Jesus rebuke them for accusing Him of something that He was not claiming? Because He was affirming His Deity! In asserting that He was “one” with the Father He was declaring Himself to be God manifested in the flesh.

During the final Passover meal Jesus ate with His disciples, He taught them that reception of Him is equal to reception of God the Father (John 13:20) and hatred of Him is equal to hatred of God the Father (John 15:24). During the same lesson, when Philip asked Him “Lord, show us the Father” (John 14:8), Jesus declared plainly, “He who has seen Me has seen the Father” (John 14:9). Think of it—how arrogant this would have been, how blasphemous this would have been if Jesus was not God in the flesh! Can you imagine Moses, Elijah, Peter, or Paul saying such words—“If you have seen Me you have seen the Father”? Jesus’ Deity is the only explanation by which these words are not an act of sin. Because Jesus is God could it be true that one who had seen Him could be said to have seen God the Father—not in the fullness of His glory (cf. 1 John 4:12), but in the Divine image of Jesus as God in the flesh.

Jesus asserted Himself as the only way to a relationship with God the Father (John 14:6). Jesus claimed that knowledge of Him is equivalent to knowledge of God the Father (John 14:7). Jesus claimed that in loving Jesus and keeping His commands both He and God the Father would make their “home with” such a person (John 14:23). While Jesus did declare, “My Father is greater than I” (John 14:28), this probably referred to Jesus’ fleshly state, or was said as a demonstration of Jesus’ submission toward God the Father (cf. John 8:29).

In the last pages of John’s gospel, the Holy Spirit continues to assert plainly the Deity of Christ. In the extended prayer Jesus offers just before going into Gethsemane He claims to have shared glory with God the Father “before the world was” (John 17:5). In His prayer for the unity of His disciples He repeatedly appeals to His own oneness with the Father as the pattern He desires His disciples to follow (John 17:11, 21-22). In this, once again Jesus proclaims, “You, Father, are in Me, and I in You” (John 17:21). After the horror of His trial and crucifixion, Jesus demonstrated His Deity in His resurrection (John 20:1-8) and in His ability to appear in the midst of the disciples inside a locked house (John 20:19). When Thomas, one of the disciples who did not see this appearance, saw Him and believed in His resurrection, he proclaimed, “My Lord and my God!” (John 20:28). If Jesus was not God in the flesh, this would have been the perfect occasion for Him to clarify a false perception. That’s what Paul and Barnabas did—they said, “We also are men with the same nature as you” (Acts 14:14-15). Jesus didn’t say that, even though one of His disciples called Him “my God.” In the verses that follow this, Jesus praised Thomas’ belief (John 20:29); and John affirmed that his gospel was written to motivate this same kind of belief (John 20:30-31). What is this belief that was praised and the gospel was intended to motivate? The firm belief that can move one to speak of Jesus Christ of Nazareth as “My Lord” and “My God.”

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 22, Issue 33 (August 16, 2020)
——————–

-2-

Why So Few Study the Bible

Bill Crews

The Bible says, “Whatsoever things were written aforetime [in the Old Testament] were written for our learning” (Romans 15:4).

And, “From a babe thou hast known the sacred writings [the Old Testament] which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus” (2 Timothy 3:15).

And, “Whoso readeth [here it refers to something written in the book of Daniel — BC] let him understand” (Matthew 24:15).

And, “And He called to Him the multitude, and said unto them, Hear and understand” (Matthew 15:10).

And, “And he that was sown upon the good ground, this is he that heareth the word [Luke 8:15 says that the good ground represents one who has an “honest and good heart” — BC], and understandeth it; who verilybeareth  fruit, and bringeth forth, some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty” (Matthew 13:23).

Philip asked the Ethiopian, “Understandeth thou what thou readest?” (Acts 8:30 — he was reading in the book of Isaiah; the passage shows that God wants us to understand what is written in His word — BC).

And, “But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 3:18).

And, “Howthat by revelation was made known unto me the mystery, as I wrote before in few words, whereby, whenye read, ye can perceive my understanding in the mystery of Christ” (Ephesians 3 :3-4 ).

And, finally, “Wherefore be ye not foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is” (Ephesians 5:17).

What Men Say in Contrast

The Bible contains all of the will of God for men (read John 16:13 — the apostles by the Holy Spirit were guided into all the truth; 2 Peter 1:3 — the apostles were given all things pertaining to life and godliness;  2 Timothy 3:16-17 — the Scriptures are able to make the man of God complete and to furnish him completely unto every good work). But some men say the Bible contains only part of God’s will for men. They thus destroy confidence in the Bible.

The Bible claims to be verbally inspired, inspired in its very expression or wording (2 Timothy 3:16-17 — see the same reference above; 2 Peter 1:20-21 — no  prophecy of Scripture came by the will of man, but the prophets spoke as they were moved by the Holy  Spirit; 1 Corinthians 2:10-13 — the hidden wisdom of  God was made known unto men like Paul by the Holy  Spirit, and those men spoke those things, not in words taught by man’s wisdom, but in words taught by the Holy Spirit; Matthew 10:19-20 and Mark 13:11 —  Jesus promised the apostles that when they were  arrested and brought to trial, the Holy Spirit would give them the words to speak). But some men say that the Bible is inspired only in thought or substance.  They thus erode faith in the inerrancy of the Bible.

The Bible was given to be understood (see the passages quoted in the beginning of this article), but some men say it was not given to be understood. They thus discourage men from even reading it.

The Bible shows that men as they are can understand the Scriptures as they are to the salvation of their souls ( according to the book of Acts, a book that records the conversions of various individuals, this is exactly what happened over and over in response to the preaching of the apostles and others), but some men say that only with the help of qualified and  authorized clergymen (the position of the Roman Catholic Church), or the help of the Book of Mormon  (the position of the “Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints”), or the help of the writings of Ellen G. White (the position of the Seventh-Day  Adventist Church), or the help of the staff of anonymous writers at Watchtower headquarters (the position of the so-called “Jehovah’s Witnesses”), can anyone understand the Bible. They thus discourage men so they will not even try to read and understand for themselves.

God obviously wants men to understand His word and is perfectly capable of giving it to men in language that can be understood, but so many denominations have been saying for so long (a) that it isn’t necessary for men to understand the things written in the Bible,  and (b) that different people can never understand the things written in the Bible alike. The unfortunate result is that few people are ever encouraged to engage in a personal, individual study of the Bible.

Some Questions

1. Was God able to make known His will to man? Was He able to make His will known in words or language that men could understand? Did He do this?

2. Did God give His word (the Bible) to man, thinking that man would be able to understand it — but not realizing till later that man would be unable to understand it?

3. Did God give His word (the Bible) to man and deliberately couch it in such language or with such words that He knew man would be unable to  understand it?

4. Does God want man to understand His word (the Bible)? Can man understand that word (the Bible)?

5. Should you set aside time to read and study and even meditate upon the Bible? Will you?

Why not become a daily student of the Bible, the revelation of God and God’s will to man,the only book Divine in origin.

— Via Roanridge Reader Volume 32 Issue 47 Page 2, November 19, 2017
——————–

-3-

News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Let us continue to remember in prayer the family and friends of Pamela Arnold and Patricia Gill Lariscy who both recently passed away.

Alan and Darlene Tanner have both tested positive for covid-19.

Michael Rittenhouse,
who has covid-19 and also pneumonia in his lower right lung, was running a fever of 102.9 yesterday and is to go to the ER if he develops any pain in his stomach.  He will be seeing his doctor Monday for a reassessment.   Michael’s son Michael will have to be tested again for covid-19, and Rebecca who had tested positive for it last week is now experiencing symptoms. Shirley Crews (Rebecca’s mother), who also tested positive for covid-19, had to be readmitted to the hospital where she is now on life support.  Also with covid-19: Sarah Rittenhouse Wright and Susanne Rittenhouse.

Doyle Rittenhouse ended up having 4 nerve ablations Monday on one side of his spine.  The pain continued until Friday.  This Wednesday, he will have 4 more nerve ablations on the other side.  

Martha Lively has found some relief from pain through chiropractic treatment.  Though the pain is still there in the early morning and evening, at least it is not all the time as it had been.  So, for a while, she will continue on a weekly basis with these treatments.

Cameron Haney is going through illness and some difficult times.

James Medlock is now over his congestive heart failure, but hasn’t been able to receive therapy, due to being quarantined in the nursing home.  He has not had covid-19, but there are others there who do have it.  An appeal has been made to see if James can stay another 21 days.

Penny Medlock is now in a group home in Augusta, Georgia. 

Deborah Medlock received a good report last week. The lymph nodes that were removed tested negative for cancer. Everything else that was removed also tested negative, except for that small nodule (1 cm), which was also removed. It had not grown nor moved since previously examined. She will be seeing her doctor this Thursday and will soon begin radiation treatments as a precautionary measure.

Rick Cuthbertson had to temporarily discontinue his cancer treatments, due to some adverse reactions he began having.  He is to remain off the medication for a week and then resume with only 2 pills a day for 21 days straight.

Others to also be praying for: Larry & Janice Hood, Jamie Cates (healing from a double lung transplant), A.J. & Pat Joyner, Elaine Abbott, Pat Brigman,  Shirley Davis, Tim Kirkland, Ronnie & Melotine Davis, Jim Lively, Judy Daugherty, Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother,Rex & Frankie Hadley,Mark Owen Mixon, and Ginger Ann Montero.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) “The Ruler of This World” (Kyle Pope)
2) Some Things to Remember . . . (Bill Crews)
3) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

“The Ruler of This World” 

Kyle Pope

When Satan tempted Jesus by offering Him rule over the earth if He would worship him, Luke 4:6 records Satan’s bold claim “all this authority . . . has been delivered to me” (NKJV). This is echoed in John 16:11 where Jesus confirms his claim identifying Satan as “the ruler of this world.” While these statements declare Satan’s rule over this world, little is revealed about the nature of this rule or the circumstances under which it came to him.

Some connect Satan’s rule with his fall. We actually know very little about the fall of Satan. The infamous Lucifer passage of Isaiah 14:12 has been improperly used to describe Satan’s fall, but the context makes it clear it is talking about the king of Babylon, not Satan (see 14:3). Jesus declared, “I saw Satan fall like lightening from heaven,” but He does so in the context of His disciples casting out demons (Luke 10:18). Was Jesus talking about a past fall or what happened in the work of His disciples (i.e. Satan’s power being taken away)? In Revelation 12:7-12 it describes Satan and his angels being cast out of heaven, but it does so in the context of Christ’s victory over sin by His blood. Whatever power Satan had at the temptation of Christ in Luke 4:6 would predate this. If the book of Revelation is understood in terms of cycles that describe the same tribulation-deliverance pattern in different ways, the binding of Satan in Revelation 20:1-3 describes the same fall as 12:7-12. In either case, neither of these gives us an account of Satan being granted authority over the earth.

What we know about Satan’s fall comes more from inference than from direct statement. For example, in the qualifications for elders given in 1 Timothy 3:6, Paul warns that if a novice was appointed, he could be “puffed up with pride” leading him to “fall into the same condemnation as the devil.”  At the very least this implies that in some way Satan’s pride led to his downfall and condemnation. What is clear is that Satan has “sinned from the beginning” (1 John 3:8) which likely refers to the beginning of this creation. He deceived the woman in the garden and even still he “deceives the whole world” (Rev. 12:9).  In the parable of the wheat and the tares it is Satan who sows tares in the world (Matt. 13:39). So, Satan in one sense is responsible for sin, even though each of us individually is responsible when we give in to sin (Jas, 1:14).

The real questions that we wrestle with regarding Satan’s rule is what authority does Satan actually possesses and in what sense was that authority “delivered over” to him by God? If we go so far as to say that any sinful influence (or authority) was established by God, it would make God the cause of sin (or temptation). That is clearly not what the Bible teaches (Jas. 1:13). On the other hand, delivering something over to Satan does not have to express assent, agreement, or approval. For example, in 1 Timothy 1:20, Paul “delivered” Hymenaeus and Alexander to Satan (i.e. he gave them over to their desire to follow Satan in their blasphemous behavior). The same is said of the man who had his father’s wife, from whom the church in Corinth had to withdraw. Paul described this as the man being delivered “to Satan” (1 Cor. 5:5). For God to allow Satan to tempt, deceive, and control the world through sin, does not make God complicit in this temptation, it is simply allowing Satan to exercise this type of influence. This may be the sense in which Satan’s power was “delivered” to Him.

Yet, what power (or authority) does Satan actually possess? In the temptation, Satan offered Jesus rule over all kingdoms. Did he really have that power and if so to what extent? It is true that often hardships of the flesh are attributed to Satan. The woman with the flow of blood was said to be “bound by Satan” (Luke 13:16). Paul’s thorn in the flesh is called a “messenger of Satan” (2 Cor. 12:7). Yet, it is unclear how directly these things should be understood. It may be that Satan is allowed to exercise some negative influence over nature. On the other hand, it may be that the fact that Satan’s influence over man in the garden, which led to a world of sickness, death, hardship, and decay, means that all natural hardship could be said to trace back to Satan as its cause. Most of the “power” that Satan seems to possess concerns man’s spiritual state. We know that when one follows the desires of Satan, he becomes a child of Satan rather than a child of God (John 8:44). In 1 Timothy 5:15 Paul speaks of those turning to sin as having “turned aside after Satan.”  This is a personal choice and not compulsion, but having followed Satan rather than God puts one in obedience to Satan rather than under the rule of God. It yields to Satan’s rule. Hebrews 2:14 says that Satan had the “power of death,” and Jesus conquered this in His death. Obedience to the gospel allows one deliverance from the “power (or authority—exousia) of Satan” (Acts 26:18). If this is understood, we can see that Satan’s authority is much like the sense in which we in Christ are part of His kingdom—it is dependent upon the assent of the governed. When I submit myself to the reign of Christ, I am under His rule. When I submit myself to the reign of Satan, I am under his rule.

One final point should be observed from Satan’s very name. Satan means “adversary.” In Revelation 12:10 Satan is called “the accuser of our brethren” who accuses them before God “day and night.” This comes in the context of the description of his fall. This may give us more information about what God has allowed Satan to do. To some extent Satan was granted the right to “accuse” human beings before God. In Job 1:6-7 Satan appears in this role of the “accuser” with some right to roam “to and fro” over the earth. In addition to Satan’s rule over man through sin and death, it may be that this role of “accuser” is a power which God has granted Satan. Yet, Christ’s death robs him of that power because it offers the atonement for sin whereby the repentant Christian can no longer properly be accused of sin.

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 22, Issue 26 (June 28, 2020)
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Some Things to Remember . . .

  • How brief and uncertain life is.
  • How sure and final death is.
  • How long eternity is.
  • And sin:
    • how strong its appeal;
    • how persistent its temptation;
    • how deceptive its appearance;
    • how misleading its promise;
    • how fleeting its pleasure;
    • how tragic its consequences;
    • how horrible its punishment.
  • How great God’s love is.
  • How wonderful Christ’s sacrifice is.
  • How powerful the gospel is.
  • How important the church is.
  • How precious one soul is.
  • How pressing salvation is.
  • How beautiful heaven is.
  • How terrible hell is.

– Via Bill Crews in The Beacon,  July 19, 2020
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-3-

News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

We extend our condolences to all the family and friends of Pamela Arnold (of Waycross, Georgia, and sister of Jim Arnold) who passed away last Wednesday, August 12.  Let us be keeping all her loved ones in prayer.

Our sympathies also go out to all the loved ones of Patricia Gill Lariscy who passed away Friday, August 14.  Let us also be remembering all her family and friends in prayer.

Michael Rittenhouse
has recently tested positive for covid-19, along with Sarah Rittenhouse Wright, Susanne Rittenhouse, and Shirley Crews.  Susanne had to be hospitalized Saturday morning and also has COPD.  She is now on oxygen.

Doyle Rittenhouse
had two nerves deadened Friday as a test to see if the ablations of nerve endings will solve his problem.  The test was successful.  So Doyle will be having 3 nerve ablations on one side of his spine this Tuesday, and 3 more the following week on the other side. 

Six surgeons have determined that the additional heart surgery for Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother will not be until another three months.  His blood pressure has improved somewhat, being now at 85/59; but he is unsteady on his feet.

Elaine Abbott will be transferred in the next couple days to Memorial Satilla Rehab.  Her bloodwork “has been favorable.”

Martha Lively has been having a lot of sciatic nerve pain for the last 3 weeks, which is worse in the early morning.  It is a constant pain and flares up at times.  She will be seeing a chiropractor this Tuesday.

Judy Daugherty has also been in much pain, following the breaking of her shoulder.  It has resulted in the need for her to sleep in a recliner, though not very well.  She will be seeing her doctor this Wednesday.

One-year-old Mark Owen Mixon continues to improve from his recent salmonella and dehydration.

Rex Hadley also continues to do better in healing from covid-19.

James Medlock is now over his congestive heart failure, but is still in the nursing home undergoing therapy.

Penny Medlock has been discharged from Saint Simons By-The-Sea and will be transferred Monday to a group home in Augusta, Georgia.

Deborah Medlock will be having a follow-up this Tuesday.  She continues to have pain from her recent surgery, but only moments when it is worse. She has not been taking any pain medicine, nor much Tylenol.

Rick Cuthbertson began 3 pills a day Friday of his new cancer treatment. He will have a follow-up this Thursday or Friday, which will also determine whether he is ready to increase the dose to 4 pills a day.  About a week after he has done so, he will then be scanned to see how this new treatment is progressing.

On Thursday, I (Tom Edwards) heard the results from my cardiologist of the nuclear stress test taken on Tuesday.  He now has a concern about one of my heart bypasses that might not be up to par.  (In 20 days, it will be 13 years that I have had that bypass, along with two others.) He has advised a heart catheterization to better determine the condition; and if a stent is needed, it can be inserted then.

Others to also be praying for: Larry & Janice Hood, Jamie Cates (healing from a double lung transplant), A.J. & Pat Joyner, Pat Brigman,  Shirley Davis, Tim Kirkland, Ronnie & Melotine Davis, Judy Daugherty, and Ginger Ann Montero.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation.

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Priests of God (Kyle Pope)
2) When a Poor Man is Rich (Heath Rogers)
3) The Cross (Wayne Goff)
4) News & Notes
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Priests of God

Kyle Pope

A priest is one who is set apart unto God for a special service to Him and His people. Priests carry out particular acts of worship and offer up sacrifices to honor and petition God. As long as men have worshipped God there have been those who have performed this service.

Under the Patriarchs

The earliest mention of men who served God in this capacity comes in the first book of the Bible. Genesis 14:18-20 tells of a man by the name of Melchizedek. Verse 18 states, “. . . he was the priest of God Most High” (NKJV). Abraham, the great man of faith, was not himself described as a priest, but he gave Melchizedek one tenth of all his spoils after the defeat of Chedorlaomer (Gen. 14:20; Heb. 7:4). Exodus 2:15-21 tells of a man named Reuel (or Jethro) who would later become Moses’s father-in-law. Verse 16 refers to him as the “Priest of Midian.” Even after Moses began to lead Israel, his advice to him removed a great burden from his shoulders (Exod. 18:1-27). During this period of time, the heads of families, even though not described as “priests” were permitted to offer their own sacrifices to God. Scripture, however, has not revealed to us how priests were chosen at this time or what was involved in their service before God. We simply know that there were those who were considered priests who served God.

Under Mosaic Law

When the Law of Moses was given, God set apart a special class of men to serve as priests. This priesthood involved a High Priest (Exod. 28:1) and those of the tribe of Levi who were descendants of Aaron (Num. 3:3). Not every Israelite could act as a priest. Tracing one’s ancestry to Aaron and Levi was required. These men attended to the tabernacle (and later to the temple). They offered sacrifices for the people which the people were not permitted to offer for themselves. Even a king was not allowed to assume the responsibility of a priest (2 Chron. 26:16-21). This was a special role they alone could fill. The lifestyle of the priests was held to a special standard of conduct. They could marry only virgins — no divorced women (Lev. 21). They could drink no wine or strong drink when they carried out their service (Lev. 10). This allowed them to have a clear mind in order to perform their service and offer a pure example before the people.

Under Christ

With the passing away of the Mosaic Law (2 Cor. 3:7-13), the Levitical and Aaronic priesthood passed away. We no longer have a way to know if someone is descended from Levi and Aaron. This has led some to affirm that now there is no priesthood in the age of Christ. That is not true. It is correct that there are no men who serve as “clergy” through whom a separate class of “laity” approach God. It is also true that under Christ there are no individuals who perform the functions of worship for others. Now worship is collective in nature and every individual Christian is expected to offer up “spiritual sacrifices” in worship to God (1 Pet. 2:4-5). However, the age of Christ, like Mosaic Law actually has both a High Priest and a priesthood.

Jesus Is the High Priest. Hebrews 4:14-15 teaches that Jesus Christ Himself serves in the role of High Priest on behalf of Christians. The nature of His work is that of intercession. Scripture says, “. . . He is able to save to the uttermost those who come to God through Him, since He ever lives to make intercession for them” (Heb. 7:25).

All Christians are Priests. The priesthood under Christ is now made up of all true believers (men, women, old, young, black, white, Jew, or Gentile). 1 Peter 2:4-5 teaches that believers are a “. . . holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.” Christians carry out this priestly service in the spiritual sacrifices we each offer up to God when we worship Him (1 Pet. 2:5; Heb. 13:15), and in daily obedience to Him, which is offered as a “living sacrifice” (Rom. 12:1).

If we are Christians, the question each of us must ask ourselves is if we are living our lives as priests of God Most High? Christians should offer up spiritual sacrifices to God every day in the way we live our lives and in our worship to Him both individually and when we assemble as a church. Just as the people of the Old Testament were commanded to only offer the best they had to God, we too must make certain our sacrifices are the best we have! As priests of God we are called to a special standard of conduct. The world should see the life of Christ in us.

Let’s recognize that we have been set apart to God as Christians and live up to this honor. Peter challenges us to recognize, “you are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light” (1 Pet. 2:9).

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 22, Issue 30, July 26, 2020
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-2-

When a Poor Man is Rich

Heath Rogers

The Proverb’s writer observed, “There is one who makes himself rich, yet has nothing; and one who makes himself poor, yet has great riches” (Prov. 13:7). How can a poor man be rich?

 1. When he learns to rejoice in God’s word. “I have rejoiced in the way of Your testimonies, as much as in all riches” (Ps. 119:14). One who has found the way of God has discovered the greatest treasure known to mankind.

 2. When he obtains wisdom. “I, wisdom, dwell with prudence, and find out knowledge and discretion… Riches and honor are with me, enduring riches and righteousness. My fruit is better than gold, yes, than fine gold, and my revenue than choice silver” (Prov. 8:12, 18-19). Wisdom will yield greater dividends in life than silver and gold.

 3. When he has a good reputation. “A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches, loving favor rather than silver and gold” (Prov. 22:1). No amount of money can open the same doors and opportunities that a good reputation can open; and no amount of money can reclaim a ruined reputation.

 4. When he lays up treasure in Heaven. “Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal; but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal” (Matt. 6:19-20). The material treasures of this world are subject to theft, depreciation, and decay. They will eventually be destroyed with fire (2 Pet. 3:10-12). The spiritual treasures we obtain in our efforts to seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness (developing our character, strengthening our brethren, saving lost souls, etc.) will last forever.

 5. When he is rich in good works. “Command those who are rich in this present age not to be haughty, nor to trust in uncertain riches but in the living God, who gives us richly all things to enjoy. Let them do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to give, willing to share, storing up for themselves a good foundation for the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life” (1 Tim. 6:17-19). Those who are rich are commanded not to trust in their wealth, but to commit themselves to being rich in good works. One does not have to possess material wealth to be rich in good works towards others.

 6. When he is rich in faith. “Listen, my beloved brethren: Has God not chosen the poor of this world to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom which He promised to those who love Him?” (James 2:5). Material wealth may get one noticed by the world, but those who are rich in faith stand out to God. They will be heirs of His kingdom; a kingdom that money cannot buy.

— Via bulletin of the Knollwood church of Christ, August 2020
——————–

-3-

The Cross

Wayne Goff

William Barclay, in his commentary on The Gospel of John, observes the following about what it means to give your life, as Jesus gave His life:

“It is told that in the First World War there was a young French soldier who was seriously wounded. His arm was so badly smashed that it had to be amputated. He was a magnificent specimen of young manhood, and the surgeon was grieved that he must go through life maimed. So he waited beside his bedside to tell him the bad news when he recovered consciousness. When the lad’s eyes opened, the surgeon said to him: ‘I am sorry to tell you that you have lost your arm.’ ‘Sir,’ said the lad, ‘I did not lose it; I gave it — for France.’

“Jesus was not helplessly caught up in a mesh of circumstances from which he could not break free. Apart from any divine power he might have called in, it is quite clear that to the end he could have turned back and saved his life. He did not lose his life; he gave it. The Cross was not thrust upon him; he willingly accepted it — for us.”

If we would stop and think about the difference between “losing” something and “giving” it, our attitudes in service to God might be greatly improved. God gave His only begotten Son, John 3:16. Jesus freely gave His life for us, Matthew 20:28. The apostles gave their lives in martyrdom as a testimony of the truthfulness of their message, Galatians 2:20. What have you and I given to God?

“And walk in love, as Christ also has loved us and given Himself for us, an offering and a sacrifice to God for a sweet-smelling aroma,” Ephesians 5:2.

“Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for her,” Ephesians 5:25.

— Via The Roanridge Reader, Volume 35, Issue 32, Page 1, August 2, 2020
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-4-

News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Though still in ICU, Larry Hood’s surgery went well — and, actually, even “better than expected.”  He will have to have radiation treatments, but now with a “much better outlook.”

Judy Daugherty (Jim Lively’s sister) fell Thursday and broke her shoulder.  She will not have to have surgery; but is using a sling and has pain. Her doctor told her that this type of breakage will usually heal on its own 75% of the time without surgery.

Rex and Frankie Hadley are both doing somewhat better.

Mark Owen Mixon (Anita Young’s 1-year old great nephew) had been very sick in the hospital with salmonella.  He is now back home, but had lost several pounds while dehydrated and “has a little ways to go to be 100%” better.  

James Medlock was transferred from the hospital to the nursing home for his congestive heart failure.

Penny Medlock is still in St. Simons-By-The-Sea.  A recent test showed that she does not have covid-19. So she might be going to the group home this week.

Deborah Medlock is doing “pretty good,” following her recent surgery.

Ronnie Davis is now over his walking pneumonia, but still has the lingering cough.

Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother is still waiting to hear when his next surgery will be, and they are continuing to keep his blood pressure low.

Doyle Rittenhouse had 12 shots last week — 6 to numb the area, and 6 to deaden the nerves.  Unfortunately, it reduced the pain for only a few hours; and then left Doyle feeling worse than before. He will be having blood work on Monday and might be seeing his doctor this Wednesday about having a nerve ablation to eliminate his back pain.  In the meanwhile, he is not to be moving around too much.

Rick Cuthbertson has been doing well with his new cancer treatment — of taking the 2 pills a day that are designed to target the needed area — though he has been having a weird feeling in his back.  He will also be doing just 2 a day this week, before moving on to 3 a day. 

Others to also be praying for: Jamie Cates (healing from a double lung transplant), A.J. & Pat Joyner, Pat Brigman,  Elaine Abbott, Shirley Davis, Tim Kirkland, Janice Hood, and Ginger Ann Montero.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) An Examination of Old Testament “Proof Texts” [on “hereditary total depravity”] (Melvin Curry)
2) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

An Examination of Old Testament “Proof Texts” [on “hereditary total depravity”]

Melvin Curry

Hereditary total depravity is generally associated with Augustinian and Calvinistic doctrine. John Calvin, following in the footsteps of Augustine, taught that all men sinned in Adam; and, consequently, every human being, except Jesus Christ, possesses from birth a totally corrupt sinful nature. Calvinists are saddled with a grave inconsistency in their position on original sin. They believe, on the one hand, that the guilt and depravity of the human race are ordained of God, while they argue, on the other hand, that God must not be accused of making men corrupt. To put the matter another way, how can human beings who are hell-bound sinners because they inherit a corrupt Adamic nature be held responsible as willful transgressors for deeds they are automatically programmed from birth to perform?

Does the Bible teach hereditary total depravity? The burden of this article will be to consider some alleged Old Testament “proofs” that Calvinists use in support of the doctrine by examining several classical texts (Gen. 6:5; Psa. 51:5; 58:3-4; Isa. 1:5-6; Jer. 17:8-9). The evidence adduced from these passages, however, is not as overwhelmingly convincing as Calvinists insist. If the doctrine of hereditary total depravity is not presupposed when such passages are studied, they are subject to alternate explanations which fall short of the Calvinistic position.

If I may be permitted to switch to the New Testament evidence for a moment, this tendency to assume more than the evidence warrants is nowhere more apparent than in the interpretation of Romans 5:12. William F. Bruner says, “This is the locus classicus of the whole doctrine of the imputation of Adam’s sin to the race” (Children of the Devil, 22). And George Eldon Ladd affirms, “It is quite clear that Paul believed in ‘original sin’ in the sense that Adam’s sin constituted all men sinners” (Theology of the New Testament 403-404). But listen to Ladd’s comments on Romans 5:12, “Grammatically, this can mean that men died because they have personally sinned, or it can mean that in Adam, all men sinned.” Ladd appeals to the surrounding context in order to support his interpretation of Romans 5:12; but, according to his own admission, his interpretation is far from conclusive. Moreover, what is true of the interpretation of Romans 5:12 is also true of the Old Testament texts. All of them together do not sustain the Calvinistic doctrine of hereditary total depravity.

Genesis 6:5 – “And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.”

There is no question that this passage teaches the depravity of man. The word “depravity” itself means “very crooked.” It is derived from two Latin terms: de, an intensive particle, and pravus, “crooked.” But Charles G. Finney observes that the depravity of man is not to be taken “in the sense of original or constitutional crookedness, but in the sense of having become crooked. The term does not imply original mal conformation, but lapsed, fallen, departed from right or straight. It always implies deterioration, or fall from a former state or moral or physical perfection” (Systematic Theology 164). Sin is defined in the Bible as “transgression of the law” of God (I John 3:4). Adam and Eve lived in a state of perfection in the Garden of Eden; but, when they transgressed God’s law, they were driven out from God’s presence as well as from the tree of life. This constituted a fall and resulted in their depravity; indeed, this was the original sin. But sin does not necessarily imply a sinful nature. If it does, how does one account for the sin of Adam and Eve? Their sin may be explained on the basis of free will and temptation without implying that they had a sinful nature. And the same thing is true with respect to that of their posterity.

Adam and Eve did not sin because they had a natural appetite for sin; Eve craved to eat the fruit and to possess knowledge, Adam partook with her of his own free will. Finney’s description of their sin is entirely sufficient: “It was simply the correlation that existed between the fruit and their constitution, its presence exciting their desires for food and knowledge. This led to prohibited indulgence. But all men sin in precisely the same way” (Systematic Theology 182). “The consent to make self-gratification an end,” continues Finney, “is the whole of sin” (182).

Thus Genesis 6:5 states that human sin was the result of deliberate choices within the human heart, which God clearly “saw,” and human depravity was of such magnitude that God’s judgment was completely just. But Calvinists go beyond the evidence when they argue hereditary total depravity from this context; indeed, the doctrine of inherited sin is not taught here.

Psalm 51:5 – “Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me.”

“The Bible in this and other places,” writes John Calvin, “clearly asserts that we were born in sin, and that it exists within us as a disease fixed in our nature” (Commentary on Psalms 2:290). But he adds: “David does not charge it upon his parents, nor trace his crime to them, but sits himself before the Divine tribunal, confesses that he was formed in sin, and that he was a transgressor ere he saw the light of the world” (290). Calvin concludes that David’s depravity is total as well as hereditary: “his nature was entirely depraved” (290), “destitute of all spiritual good” (290), and “sin cleaved by nature to every part of him without exception” (291). This is true because David, like all men, sinned in Adam. When Adam “fell, we all forfeited along with him our original integrity” (291). Martin Luther goes even further: “Thus the true and proper meaning is this: ‘I am a sinner, not because I have committed adultery, nor because I have had Uriah murdered. But I have committed adultery and murder because I was born, indeed conceived and formed in the womb as a sinner.’ So we are not sinners because we commit this or that sin, but we commit them because we are sinners first” (Works 12:348).

But the clear intent of David in Psalm 51 is to assume the blame for his own sin: “Have mercy upon me” (v. 1); “blot out my transgressions” (v. 1); “wash me thoroughly from mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin” (v. 2); “I acknowledge my transgressions; and my sin is ever before me” (v. 3); “against thee, thee only, have I sinned” (v. 4). John T. Willis says: “It does not make sense to understand the king to mean that his mother sinned (by adultery or fornication) when she conceived David, or that she was a sinful woman when he was conceived. It is clearly David’s sin that is meant here. The best explanation is that the poet is using an Ancient Near Eastern idiom meaning that he, like all human beings, was prone or inclined to sin from his youth up because he was constantly surrounded by sin and temptation” (Insights from the Psalms 2:60). The fact that David was “surrounded by sin and temptation” from his birth made David painfully aware that he was not the only sinner. Nor was he the first sinner; that dishonor is reserved for Adam. Even if the passage teaches that David’s mother was, in some sense, a sinner at the time of his conception, there is nothing here that suggests that she possessed a corrupt nature, or that her corrupt nature was transmitted to her infant son. Such a doctrine must be assumed to be true on other grounds and forced into play in the interpretation of this text.

Psalm 58:3 – “The wicked are estranged from the womb: they go astray as soon as they be born, speaking lies. “

If Psalm 58:3 is pressed literally, the simple but absurd conclusion is that new-born babies are liars. In the first place, however, David is speaking particularly about a special class of “wicked” men as distinct from the whole human race or from saints. And, secondly, these wicked men are described in highly figurative poetic language. The admission of Albert Barnes, a staunch Calvinist, is to the point: “Strictly speaking, therefore, it cannot be shown that the psalmist in this declaration had reference to the whole human race, or that he meant to make a universal declaration in regard to man as being early estranged or alienated from God; and the passage, therefore, cannot directly, and with exact propriety, be adduced to prove the doctrine that ‘original sin’ appertains to all the race, – whatever may be true on that point” (Psalms 2:138). Furthermore, he comments, “It is only, therefore, after it is proved that men are depraved or ‘wicked’ that this passage can be cited in favor of the doctrine of original sin” (138). A more honest appraisal of the passage could not be made. Even if one grants that the passage teaches that children lie as soon as they speak at all, “this would not prove,” writes Finney, “that their nature was in itself sinful, but might well consist with the theory that their physical depravity, together with their circumstances of temptation, led them into selfishness, from the very moment of their moral existence” (Systematic Theology 179).

Isaiah 1:5-6 – “Why should ye be stricken any more? ye will revolt more and more: the whole head is sick, and the whole heart is faint. From the sole of the foot even unto the head there is no soundness in it…”

Although some expositors have adduced this passage in support of the doctrine of original sin, such an interpretation is wholly out of harmony with the context. Isaiah is speaking about the punishment which God has heaped upon the nation of Judah because it has rebelled against him: “Ah sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity” (v. 4). Nothing at all is intimated about how sin is transmitted by heredity. The “wounds and bruises” (v. 6) have been received because of willful transgressions. Even John Calvin recognized that the corruption of the nation was the result of “hardened impenitence” (Commentary on Isaiah 1:47).

Jeremiah 17:9 – “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?”

This passage provides an opportunity to sum up my remarks. I affirm that men are depraved, in the sense that I defined this term above, and that the effect of sin leaves the human heart “deceitful above all things.” Thus I have no quarrel with Calvinists over the fact that depravity is total or pervasive in an individual, i.e., that “the whole of man’s being has been affected by sin” (Steele and Thomas, The Five Points of Calvinism 25). I deny, however, that man is totally depraved in the sense that he cannot exercise his free will in conversion and must be granted faith as a supernatural gift. My disagreement with them is over their position that man’s corruption is inborn, inherited at birth from Adam; and, therefore, that man “can do nothing pertaining to his salvation” (Five Points of Calvinism 25). Not one of the passages discussed in this article affirms anything about man’s inborn, corrupt nature or his spiritual inability. The doctrine of hereditary total depravity is not taught in these Old Testament texts.

— Via Guardian of Truth XXXI: 1, pp. 29-30, January 1, 1987
——————–

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News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Pat Brigman
(Tina Allen’s aunt) is going through a difficult time with chemo and radiation treatments for stage 4 lung cancer. 

Larry Hood (Pat Joyner’s brother-in-law) will be having very intensive surgery this week that will involve 4 surgeons working all day on him.  His wife Janice takes medication for her Trigeminal neuralgia, but stress can make it worse.

Deborah Medlock’s
surgery for a small malignant growth (1 cm), which was detected by a mammogram in June, will be tomorrow (August 3). 

Elaine Abbott is still undergoing treatments of chemotherapy once a week and hemodialysis three times a week and has been physically weak.

Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother is healing well from his heart surgery (almost 3 weeks ago), but he also will be having another surgery for an aortic dissection in the lower portion of his aorta. His doctor will be contacting the surgeons this week to work out the when and the where for sometime this month.  In the meanwhile, they have been keeping his blood pressure at just 80/55.  

It was determined, by testing, that Leona “Lea” Medlock (Deborah’s daughter-in-law) had been ill with covid-19.  But she is now feeling better, yet still keeping herself quarantined at home and is now into her third week.

Rick Cuthbertson began his new cancer treatment Thursday and also had it on Friday.  It had made him tired for only about 20 or so minutes afterwards.

Ronnie Davis has been having walking pneumonia and a difficult time with a lingering cough.

Penny Medlock will soon have been a week in St. Simons-By-The Sea.   

Doyle Rittenhouse continues to feel much better following his third set of shots for his back pain, though not all of it has been eliminated. He will be seeing his doctor again this week.

Jim Lively had another fall Thursday, but it led to no injuries.  His head hit a swivel standing mirror, so the impact was not as severe as hitting something stationary. 

Rex Hadley is not over covid-19 yet, but has improved somewhat.  He still, however, is very weak, coughing, and with other symptoms.  A couple days ago, he did start eating more, and Friday was his first day without a fever.  His wife Frankie is going through another UTI that makes her extra weak, which she is on medication for.

James Medlock’s dementia has improved.  He is doing “way better than before.” 

Shirley Davis continues to heal from her recent procedure of a pace maker implant and is feeling much better, though she is weak.  She is having a physical therapist come to her home for treatments.  When I asked her what she would like me to tell the brethren at Tebeau Street, she said, “To keep praying for me, and I love them all.”

Others to also be praying for: Jamie Cates (healing from a double lung transplant), A.J. & Pat Joyner,Tim Kirkland, Ray Daugherty, and Ginger Ann Montero.
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 

evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
https://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) The Lord’s Supper (Kyle Pope)
2) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

The Lord’s Supper

Kyle Pope

As the children of Israel were coming out of their bondage in the land of Egypt, the Lord instituted a memorial that the Israelites were to keep as a reminder of the great deliverance God granted them from the final plague that struck the Egyptians. While the Lord struck dead the first born of everyone in Egypt, those who observed the Lord’s instructions among the Jews were spared this horror. From that time forward the Jews were to keep the Passover meal each year in memory of when death had “passed over” their people (see Exodus 12). It is not coincidence that on the night that Jesus observed the Passover with His disciples, He instituted a similar memorial of His death for the children of God under the New Covenant.

The Institution of the Lord’s Supper

The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke all record the Lord’s institution of this memorial (Matt. 26:26-29; Mark 14:22-25; Luke 22:17-20). In addition to this the apostle Paul in First Corinthians, in response to the Corinthian’s abuse of the memorial, recounts the Lord’s institution of the Lord’s Supper (1 Cor. 11:23-25). Let us observe what was involved in this institution.

1. “Then came the Day of Unleavened Bread, when the Passover must be killed” (Luke 22:7, NKJV). As Jesus met with His disciples on the night before His death, it was to observe the Passover meal. In accordance with the Law of Moses, His disciples had prepared a place for them to eat the meal (Luke 22:8-12). This involved removing all leaven from the house where the memorial was to be observed. The Passover began a period of seven days in which no leaven could be in their houses at all (Exod. 12:6, 15-18).

2. “And He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, ‘This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me’” (Luke 22:19). While eating the Passover, Jesus took of the unleavened bread and gave thanks to God for it. He then broke the bread and gave it to each of the disciples. Both Matthew and Mark record His instruction, “Take, eat” (Matt. 26:26; Mark 14:22). Then Jesus told His disciples, “This is My body.” With this, Jesus set forth the significance of what was being done. The bread was a figure of Jesus’ body that was “given” (Luke 22:19) and “broken” (1 Cor. 11:24) for His disciples. This was not to be done to satisfy hunger, but was to be done “in remembrance” of Jesus.

3. “Then He took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, ‘Drink from it, all of you. For this is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission of sins’” (Matt. 26:27,28). This cup, Jesus Himself called the “fruit of the vine” (Matt. 26:29; Mark 14:25 and Luke 22:18). It was to be a figure of the blood that Jesus would shed of the forgiveness of man’s sins. As with the bread, Paul tells us that Jesus told his disciples, “this do, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of Me” (1 Cor. 11:25).

Observance of the Lord’s Supper

The Bible offers us at least three examples of the observance of the Lord’s Supper among churches in the New Testament: 1) The church in Jerusalem; 2) The church in Troas, and 3) The church in Corinth.

1. The church in Jerusalem. After the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost, recorded in Acts chapter two, the Bible describes the establishment of the church in Jerusalem. After Peter and the others taught the people, the Bible tells us that 3,000 souls heeded their message and were baptized (Acts 2:41). We are then told about the conduct of the church. Included in the list of their activities, we are told that the Christians there continued steadfastly “in the breaking of bread” (Acts 2:42).

2. The church in Troas. As Paul traveled teaching he came to the ancient city of Troas in modern day Turkey (Acts 20:6). While there Scripture tells us, “Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul, ready to depart the next day, spoke to them and continued his message until midnight” (Acts 20:7).

3. The church in Corinth. In First Corinthians Paul refers to the Corinthians’ observance of the Lord’s Supper in two passages. The first comes in the midst of a discussion about Christians separating themselves from idolatry. In this passage Paul emphasizes that just as partaking of the bread and fruit of the vine unites Christians with the Lord and one another, if Christians eat things sacrificed to idols they unite themselves with idolatry (1 Cor. 10:15-22). The second reference addresses an abuse of the memorial that the Corinthians had committed. Instead of treating the Supper as the memorial observance the Lord intended, they had turned it into a common meal. Paul rebuked them, restates the details of the institution of the memorial, teaches them to eat at home for hunger, and commands them to observe the memorial with the right attitude (1 Cor. 11:17-34).

Names of the Lord’s Supper

• The Lord’s Supper. Paul uses the phrase most frequently used in this study in First Corinthians 11:20 referring to the memorial as “the Lord’s Supper.”

• Communion. In the tenth chapter of First Corinthians Paul refers to the cup as “the communion of the blood of Christ” (10:16a) and the bread as “the communion of the body of Christ” (10:16b). The word translated “communion” is the Greek word koinōnia (κοινωνία) most frequently translated “fellowship” in the English New Testament. It is defined as “joint participation” (Thayer). In the institution of the Lord’s Supper, Jesus said, “Assuredly, I say to you, I will no longer drink of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new in the kingdom of God” (Mark 14:25). The Christian who properly partakes of the Lord’s Supper is spiritually participating with Christ in the observance.

In the same passage where Paul speaks of the memorial as the communion of the body and blood of Christ, three other terms are used to refer to the elements of the Lord’s Supper.

• The Cup of Blessing. The communion of the blood of Christ is identified as “the cup of blessing” (1 Cor. 10:16a). 

• The Cup of the Lord. Five verses later the same element is referred to as “the cup of the Lord” (1 Cor. 10:21).

• Breaking of Bread. When Paul speaks of the communion of the body of Christ he identifies it as “the bread which we break” (1 Cor. 10:16b).

Although early church writers used the term, the Lord’s Supper was never referred to in Scripture as the Eucharist. This name was derived from the Greek verb translated “given thanks” in two accounts of Jesus’ establishment of the memorial (Luke 22:19; 1 Cor. 11:24). It is not a biblical name for the memorial.

False Teaching on the Lord’s Supper

1. “The Lord’s Supper is a Sacrament.” A sacrament is thought to be a religious act by which Divine grace is dispersed. While it is true that all things that God gives to man can rightly be considered gifts of grace (see Rom. 12:6), the Bible does not teach that partaking of the Lord’s Supper infuses a person with additional grace. Christians should observe the Lord’s Supper in obedience to Christ and for the edification it offers to us.

2. “It Becomes the Literal Body and Blood of Christ.” The Roman Catholic Church and some Protestant churches teach that the bread and fruit of the vine blessed by a priest are changed into the literal body and blood of Jesus. This stems from a misapplication of Jesus’ words in John chapter six. While Jesus taught in that text “…Most assuredly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink His blood, you have no life in you” (John 6:53), He explained to His disciples at the end of the chapter that He was referring to spiritually feeding upon Jesus’ life and teaching. He clarifies near the end of the chapter “It is the Spirit who gives life; the flesh profits nothing. The words that I speak to you are spirit, and they are life” (John 6:63).

3. “It Can Be Observed Upon Any Day.” It is clear from Scripture that the observance of the Lord’s Supper was to be a congregational activity. In Paul’s rebuke to the Corinthians we see that it was to be done when Christians “come together as a church” (1 Cor. 11:18) when they “come together in one place” (1 Cor. 11:20). They were to eat at home to satisfy hunger (1 Cor. 11:34), and when they ate of the memorial they were to “wait for one another” (I Cor. 11:33). The only text that indicates a time when the memorial was observed specifies brethren coming together on Sunday—the first day of the week (Acts 20:7). While the phrase “breaking bread” can refer to either the memorial or a common meal, even when the church in Jerusalem met daily in the temple, their meals for hunger were satisfied “from house to house” (Acts 2:46).

4. “It Doesn’t Need to Be Observed Every Sunday.” It is clear that Christians met regularly on Sunday (cf. Acts 20:7; 1 Cor. 16:1-2). The only clear indication of the time upon which the Lord’s Supper was observed is Sunday (Acts 20:7). Given that no particular Sunday is specified and every week has a “first day of the week,” the only action that would truly comply with the New Testament pattern would be weekly observance.

5. “A Priest Alone Can Take the Cup.” The Bible teaches that all Christians are priests who offer up spiritual sacrifices to God (1 Peter 2:5). When Jesus instituted the memorial He gave both elements to His disciples and instructed them to partake. Matthew even reveals a specific statement Jesus made concerning the cup telling them “drink from it, all of you” (Matthew 26:27). Another person can’t drink the cup for someone else any more than another person can sing, confess Christ, or be baptized for someone else.

6. “There Must Be Only One Cup.” It is true that Paul spoke of the fruit of the vine as “the cup [singular] of the Lord” (1 Cor. 10:21) and “the cup [singular] of blessing” (1 Cor. 10:16), but this refers to unity of substance rather than the unity of container holding the substance. Technically Luke records that Jesus’ first instructions concerned dividing the contents of the cup among the disciples who were present. Luke writes: “Then He took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, ‘Take this and divide it among yourselves’” (Luke 22:17). It is after the supper that He then attached memorial significance to the cup and had them drink from the contents of the cup He had previously divided among them (Luke 22:20).

7. “The Container Represents the New Covenant.” Some have falsely argued that the container is a figure of the New Covenant based on Jesus’ statement, “this cup is the new covenant in my blood” (Luke 22:20; 1 Cor. 11:25). It is clear from the texts that He is referring to the contents of the cup and not the container. We note that it is called the new covenant “in my blood.” A container does not represent blood. It is the fruit of the vine within the container that does.

— Via Faithful Sayings, Volume 21, Issue 48 (December 1, 2019)
——————–

-2-

News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Pat Brigman
(Tina Allen’s aunt) has stage 4 lung cancer. She is going through chemotherapy and radiation treatments at the same time and is feeling very ill.

Larry Hood (Pat Joyner’s brother-in-law) has Crohn’s disease, cancer near his eye, 4 spinal fractures, and is in much pain.

Janice Hood (Larry’s wife) has Trigeminal neuralgia and other health issues.

Elaine Abbot is still undergoing treatments of chemotherapy once a week and hemodialysis three times a week.  She is physically weak and will find the wheelchair helpful that her daughter-in-law Anita has taken to her.

Rex Hadley still has the pain in his legs from ballooned disks.  Concerning the covid-19 that he has had for the last couple weeks, Anita Young wrote yesterday that her dad “had a rough week, but has hopefully made a turn for the better.”  He is still running a low-grade fever, is very weak, and had some chills Friday afternoon.  But he is doing better than he was a few days ago.

Rick Cuthbertson has not yet begun his new cancer treatment, which will be in pill form — but he is looking forward to it with a good, positive attitude.  For the first week, he will be taking 1 pill a day; 2 a day for the second week; 3 a day for the third, and 4 a day for the fourth (which will also be the final week).  Following the treatments, he will then be scanned for the results. 

James Medlock’s dementia has become worse lately, so he is now back in the hospital and will be having his medication adjusted.

A.J. Joyner is starting to have peripheral neuropathy, along with stomach problems.  His wife Pat has numerous health issues, including COPD and scarring of the lungs called Atelectasis.

Penny Medlock, who was having trouble breathing due to covid-19, is still in ICU; but a recent test came back negative for it.  She was later tested again, and the results will probably be in today (if they were not yesterday).  If it is again negative, she will then be transferred to a behavioral health facility, such as St. Simons-By-The-Sea or one like it (maybe tomorrow).  There she will spend a couple weeks or more (depending on how she does).  If she is cleared there, she will then be transferred to a group home in Augusta, which she is looking forward to.  She has been in a good mood.

Deborah Medlock’s surgery is tentatively planned for July 31.  But if it will be sooner, she might find out tomorrow. 

Leona “Lea” Medlock (Deborah’s daughter-in-law) has been ill for a few days. She thinks she might have covid-19, but has not yet been tested.

We are glad that things went well for Shirley Davis in her recent pace maker implant.  She is feeling much better. However, she is still having kidney problems that will require seeing a doctor.  Plus the pain in her shoulder and knee still bothers her, and she has UTL.  I also want to mention her daughter Stephanie Jordan for prayer, who has been suffering with rheumatoid arthritis for about 20 years.

Joyce Rittenhouse wrote yesterday, concerning the pain her husband has been having, that “Doyle had his third set of two shots in the back.  They are working so far, but his blood sugars are running a little high.”  But “That is under control with extra insulin.”  Joyce also reports that her brother, who is healing from his recent heart surgery, “hasn’t had any headaches this week.”  He “is still real weak, but is getting better every day and will see his heart surgeon next Wednesday.”

Ginger Ann Montero, who had only a little of her pain eliminated in her last visit to her doctor, is now awaiting her next appointment —  of which her husband Bud writes, “Second time should do the trick.”

Elizabeth Harden (Anita Young’s daughter) is expecting a baby boy January 4!

Others to also be praying for: Jamie Cates (healing from a double lung transplant), Tim Kirkland, Ray Daugherty, Jim Lively, and Ronnie Davis (allergy trouble).

——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 

evangelist/editor: Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) From Confusion to Peace (Kyle Pope)
2) Did The Church Come Together For A Common Meal in Acts 20? (Greg Gwin)
2) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

From Confusion to Peace

Kyle Pope

You don’t have to look very far in the world around you to see that most people live their lives ruled by a sense of chaos. They might not recognize that this is the case, but if they stopped and honestly looked at their lives from the outside they would have to admit that they are controlled by the ebb and flow of emotions, finances, illness, disaster, or even the desire for pleasure, recognition, glory, or satisfaction. None of us are free from the hardships of life, but the Christian has something to which he or she can cling that the world does not have: a sense of direction.

You see the Bible tells us that as a result of sin entering the world, chaos, corruption, and decay rule the natural world. The preacher in the book of Ecclesiastes declared that “time and chance” plague all things under the sun (Eccl. 9:11). Paul told the Romans that the creation is in “bondage to corruption” (Rom. 8:21). In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus reminds us that in this world “moth and rust destroy” things which we might hold dear (Matt. 6:19). For Christians, however, there can be a tangible sense of direction that comes from choosing to look beyond the physical world and aim towards a home in heaven with God. In this home, the Bible tells us “neither moth nor rust destroy, and . . . thieves do not break in and steal” (Matt. 6:20, NKJV).

The Christian can also have a sense of direction when it comes to how life ought to be lived. The Christian believes that the Bible is not merely an old book full of interesting stories. The Christian holds that it is actually the revelation of the Spirit of God given to mankind for his guidance and direction. When the Christian submits himself to it’s rule, he allows himself to be led by the very mind of God. This is what it means to be “led by the Spirit” (cf. Rom. 8:14; Gal. 5:18). This can be a comforting thing. When a difficulty arises in life and we must choose one way or the other, the Christian’s choice is often made ahead of time by the principles of Scripture. He or she doesn’t have to worry and fret about what to do—God’s word points the way to the best possible choice.

Some might call this a “crutch” and say they would prefer their own freedom of choice. Everyone loves freedom, but who knows better how I should live my life than the very One who made me? David said:

“O Lord, You have searched me and known me.
You know my sitting down and my rising up;
You understand my thought afar off.
You comprehend my path and my lying down, and are acquainted with all my ways”
(Ps. 139:1-3).

In addition to this, the Bible reveals that no one is ever truly free. All of us are either “slaves of sin” or we are “slaves of God” (Rom. 6:15-23). Submission to the will of God liberates us from the chaos and destruction that sin holds over our lives.

The Bible tells us that when people choose not to “retain God in their knowledge” they actually come to think about things in ways that are contrary to their very nature. Romans 1:28 speaks of such people as being given over to a “debased mind.” In such a state they are described as being “futile in their thoughts” (Rom. 1:21). To the Ephesians, Paul spoke of such people as “having their understanding darkened” and having hearts that are hardened (Eph. 4:18). In such a condition people come to view evil as good and good as evil. When this happens, the result is chaos and confusion.

You see when we come to believe that there is no absolute truth, no moral black and white, no unquestionable values, then nothing is right, everything is grey and there is no truth! The world we see around us is a perfect example of this. We claim to be so advanced as we throw out traditional values of the past. For the cause of freedom, we reject family roles, marriage bonds, personal responsibilities, modesty, and moderation, then wonder why our lives are in chaos. You see God’s instructions are not simply to satisfy His own wishes, they are “for our good always, that He might preserve us” (Deut. 6:24).

Near the close of his first epistle to the church in Corinth the apostle Paul through the direction of the Holy Spirit gives instructions about conduct in the assembly. In the midst of this discussion he makes a powerful statement. He writes, “ . . . For God is not the author of confusion but of peace” (1 Cor. 14:33). What a beautiful thought! In the midst of a universe of chaos, in Christ there can be peace. James will tell us through the Holy Spirit, “where envy and self-seeking exist, confusion and every evil thing will be there. But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits . . . ” (Jas. 3:16-17).

Where do you find your life? Are you in submission to the will of God? Do you find in God peace and a wisdom that lifts you out of the chaos and confusion of this world, or do you try to live with one foot in the madness and the other in the truth? Paul challenged the brethren in Colosse to “let the peace of God rule in your hearts” (Col. 3:15). Only in Christ can you find that “peace which surpasses all understanding” (Phil. 4:7). The choice is yours, but God calls you out of confusion into true and lasting peace.

— Via Focus Online, July 16, 2020
——————–

-2-

Did The Church Come Together For A Common Meal in Acts 20?

Greg Gwin

A question has been asked about ‘eating’ in Acts 20:6-11:

“And we sailed away from Philippi after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days; where we abode seven days. And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight. And there were many lights in the upper chamber, where they were gathered together. And there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus, being fallen into a deep sleep: and as Paul was long preaching, he sunk down with sleep, and fell down from the third loft, and was taken up dead. And Paul went down, and fell on him, and embracing him said, Trouble not yourselves; for his life is in him. When he therefore was come up again, and had broken bread, and eaten, and talked a long while, even till break of day, so he departed.”

We have emphasized two instances of “breaking bread” in the text. This expression is an idiom that can have reference to either a common meal (as in Acts 2:46) or the Lord’s Supper (as in Acts 2:42, 1 Cor. 10:16; 1 Cor. 11:23-26).

We believe the first reference in Acts 20 is in regards to the Lord’s Supper. We reach this conclusion because:

– The context implies that Paul waited in the city of Troas for seven days in order to be present at this assembly. Why wait if this were a common meal that could have been eaten on any day of the week?

– The disciples had specifically come together for the purpose of this ‘breaking of bread.’ But Paul had previously condemned the concept of a church coming together for the eating of common meals (1 Cor. 11:20-22,34). Paul would not have violated his own teaching in this matter, and therefore this must have been referring to the Lord’s Supper.

But, what about the second occurrence of “breaking bread” in Acts 20 (verse 11)? Here we conclude that the meaning is of a common meal, because:

– The assembly had already been broken up because of the death and miraculous revival of Eutychus.

– The timing of this ‘eating’ was at sometime after midnight (vs. 7) and thus, by either Roman or Hebrew timekeeping, would have been on Monday, not Sunday.

– The meeting of the church, now dismissed, had likely occurred in a private home where common food stuffs would have been available for those who normally lived there and their guests.

– Paul did this without violating the previously mentioned prohibition on the church ‘coming together’ to eat common meals (1Cor. 11:20-22,34).

– And, Paul is the only one mentioned who consumed the food (vs. 11). This was in anticipation of his leaving the city within a matter of hours to continue his journey. It would be impossible to prove that any other person ate a single morsel of food, and therefore impossible to use this text to demonstrate that the whole church was involved in eating a common meal as an official or sponsored activity of the collective body.

— Via The Beacon, June 28, 2020
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-3-

News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

Penny Medlock, who had been hospitalized in Valdosta for 7 days, was taken from there to the ICU in Waycross late Saturday night, due to having tested positive for covid-19 and having trouble breathing.

Anita Young has requested prayer for her elderly parents: Rex Hadley’s test results came back positive last Monday for covid-19.  He has been sick for several days, but is showing a little improvement today.  Also pray for his wife Frankie, who has been in poor health for a long time, that she does not also come down with it.

Pat Joyner would like prayer for her brother-in-law Larry Hood.  She writes, “He has Crohn’s disease, cancer near his eye, 4 spinal fractures, in massive pain.  Doctors will make a decision on the 21st as what to do for some of his health challenges. He was a preacher for 30 years. Then he taught school.  He is now 85 years old. “Prayers of a righteous man meaneth much.”  Pat also mentions her 83-year old sister Janice (Larry’s wife) who has Trigeminal neuralgia and other health issues. (Trigeminal neuralgia is a chronic facial pain that can act up from just chewing, speaking, brushing one’s teeth, putting on makeup, or even any other mild stimulation to the face.  And in Janice’s case, it also includes just putting her hand near her face without evening touching it that will cause pain.)

A.J. Joyner is starting to have peripheral neuropathy. He also has stomach problems.  His wife Pat has numerous health issues, including COPD and scarring of the lungs called Atelectasis.  They are both elderly and having to be very isolated for precautionary measures. 

Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother continues to heal from the major heart surgery he recently had.  He has now gone two days without a headache, but is still a little unsteady on his feet.  He will be having a blood test tomorrow to see if it is still too thick.

Deborah Medlock had her pre-op Tuesday, but was not told when the actual surgery will be.  Initially, it was planned for the 31st; but that now needs to be changed to another day, which she will find out Tuesday.

Ginger Ann Montero finally was able to receive a shot for the pain she has been having in her arm, but it has given her only little relief.

Doyle Rittenhouse saw his doctor Monday.   Joyce writes that Doyle “will be getting two shots in his back Wednesday.  Right now he is having trouble with gout in both feet and his sugars are running a little high.”

Rick Cuthbertson is now receiving a new kind of cancer treatment.

Let us also continue to remember the following in prayer:  Jamie Cates, Tim Kirkland, Elaine Abbott, Ray Daugherty,  Jim Lively, and Shirley Davis
  ——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith,
 living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917

Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

The Gospel Observer

“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations…teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NASB).
——————–

Contents:

1) Does It Really Matter to God? (Jefferson David Tant)
2) News & Notes
——————–

-1-

Does It Really Matter to God?

Jefferson David Tant

In discussing religious differences, varied attitudes are expressed when it is pointed out that some particular practice or doctrine of a church conflicts with what the Bible says. One of the more common responses when a contradiction is seen is “Well, I don’t think it matters with God.” This writer believes that this attitude is dangerous, and wholly unacceptable to God. Please consider what God’s Word reveals about such matters.

The very first sin involved Adam and Eve eating some forbidden fruit. From the human viewpoint, what could possibly be so serious about eating a little piece of fruit? Was Eve convinced by Satan that it really didn’t matter to God? Whatever her thoughts were, the result was disastrous. God really did care.

In time, the world became so wicked that God decided to remove evil from the earth. Noah found favor in God’s sight, so God instructed Noah to build a large boat, giving him specific instructions concerning its construction. He gave Noah the dimensions of the ark, and also told him to make it out of gopher wood. “Make thee an ark of gopher wood: rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and shalt pitch it within and without with pitch” (Gen. 6:14). Suppose that Noah had decided to add some oak trim in his living quarters because Mrs. Noah wanted a little variety. Would that have mattered to God? After all, what difference could a little wood possibly make? Or what if he decided to make the ark 10 meters longer. Would that have been acceptable?

In offering worship to God, does it matter to him what we do? I have heard various comments when discussing acceptable worship. Some say, “I really like it…” about some practice. Then the question is whether our worship is meant to please us or to please God? If God is the object of our worship, can we know how to please him apart from revelation? Do we set the standard, or do we allow God to do so? When we insist on doing what pleases us, thinking that it will surely please God, we must remember the words of the prophet Isaiah. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith Jehovah. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts” (Isa. 55:8-9).

Others say, “I don’t think it matters to God.” Long ago, there were two priests who evidently thought this. Nadab and Abihu were offering incense to the Lord, and had to obtain fire to burn it. There was a problem, shown in Leviticus 10:1-3: “And Nadab and Abihu, the sons of Aaron, took each of them his censer, and put fire therein, and laid incense thereon, and offered strange fire before Jehovah, which he had not commanded them. And there came fire from before Jehovah, and devoured them; and they died before Jehovah. Then Moses said unto Aaron, This is what Jehovah spake, saying, I will be sanctified in them that come nigh me, and before all the people I will be glorified. And Aaron held his peace.” Evidently Nadab and Abihu thought “Fire is fire, and one fire burns as well as another. It doesn’t matter to God where we get the fire.” But it did matter. God had told them to take the fire from another place, very likely from the bronze altar. It made a difference to God. Notice also that it does not say that God told them not to take fire from another place. The text simply says that they took fire “which he had not commanded them.” When people justify a practice because “God didn’t say not to do it,” they mistake silence for consent. By the same reasoning, one could feel free to steal my car, justifying the deed by claiming, “But you didn’t tell me not to do it.” Nadab and Abihu certainly learned the hard way that it does make a difference! Remember, what Nadab and Abihu must have thought was not the same thing that God thought.

As Moses led the people Israel out of Egypt and through their wilderness wandering, more than once he was impatient with their lack of faith. They grumbled often, forgetting how God had provided for them time and again: When they complained of thirst, God told Moses to strike a rock that was in their presence, and water would come forth. Moses did so, and the people were blessed with an abundance of water (Ex. 17:6). Sometime later, the people again complained that they were about to die, and they blamed Moses for taking them away from Egypt. God then gave instruction to Moses concerning obtaining water. “And Jehovah spoke unto Moses, saying, Take the rod and assemble the congregation, thou, and Aaron thy brother, and speak ye unto the rock before their eyes, that it give forth its water; and thou shalt bring forth to them water out of the rock; so thou shalt give the congregation and their cattle drink.” Notice what God told Moses. Previously he had instructed Moses to strike the rock with his rod. This time he tells Moses to speak to the rock. So what did Moses do? “And Moses took the rod from before Jehovah, as he commanded him. And Moses and Aaron gathered the assembly together before the rock, and he said unto them, Hear now, ye rebels; shall we bring you forth water out of this rock? And Moses lifted up his hand, and smote the rock with his rod twice: and water came forth abundantly, and the congregation drank, and their cattle.” Some might think, “So what’s the big deal? Moses got water, didn’t he? It really didn’t matter to God whether Moses struck the rock, or spoke to it.” But as we read on in the text, we learn that it did matter to God. “And Jehovah said unto Moses and Aaron, Because ye believed not in me, to sanctify me in the eyes of the children of Israel, therefore ye shall not bring this assembly into the land which I have given them” (Numbers 20:7-12).  Moses came to understand that when God said something, his words were to be respected.

Many years later, David was returning the ark of the covenant to its rightful place after it had been captured by the Philistines. “And they set the ark of God upon a new cart, and brought it out of the house of Abinadab that was in the hill: and Uzzah and Ahio, the sons of Abinadab, drove the new cart. And they brought it out of the house of Abinadab, which was in the hill, with the ark of God: and Ahio went before the ark… And when they came to the threshing floor of Nacon, Uzzah put forth his hand to the ark of God, and took hold of it, for the oxen stumbled.  And the anger of Jehovah was kindled against Uzzah; and God smote him there for his error; and there he died by the ark of God” (II Sam. 6:3-6). Why did Uzzah die? Certainly his heart was right, for his only desire was to save the ark from damage if it fell to the ground. Who could fault that?

In truth, there were two problems. First, God had given instructions about moving the ark. The ark had rings on its sides, and poles were to be put through the rings so the Kohathites could carry the ark in that manner. They had no authority, i.e., no permission to carry the ark on a cart. In the second place, it was forbidden for anyone to touch the ark (Numbers 4:5-15). Who would have ever thought it would make any difference as to whether the ark was carried on a cart or by the priests? After all, the object was to bring it back to where it belonged. And surely Uzzah had a good heart when he put his hand to the ark to steady it. But his presumptuousness brought death. As one commentary phrased it, “Here we see the danger it is to follow good intentions, or to do anything in God’s service without his express word” (Geneva Bible Notes).

There was a Gentile prophet named Balaam, who had been asked by the Moabite king, Balak, to come and curse Israel. Balak offered a reward of great riches. But Balaam knew better, and his response to Balak is something we should all learn. “And Balaam answered and said unto the servants of Balak, If Balak would give me his house full of silver and gold, I cannot go beyond the word of Jehovah my God, to do less or more” (Num. 22:18). Balaam certainly stated a principle that we should all remember. We are not at liberty to go beyond what God has said, no matter how good our intentions may be.

In II Kings is the story of a Syrian army general named Naaman. He had leprosy, and was told by his Jewish servant girl that he could be cured in Israel. Naaman ended up at the door of the prophet Elisha, who sent word to him to go dip in the Jordan River seven times and he would be healed. At first Naaman thought this was entirely stupid, and went away in a rage. But a servant prevailed upon him. Naaman changed his mind and did as the prophet instructed. When he came up the seventh time, his skin was like that of a little child. There are three things that Naaman could have changed in this matter. He could have gone to another river; he could have dipped either more or fewer than the seven times, or he could have just poured a cup of water on his head rather than dip in the river. Do you think he would have been cured of his leprosy if he had just dipped five times? Or if he had taken a cup and poured water on his head? Surely not.

In considering these illustrations from the Bible, we can clearly see that when God says something, he means what he says, and men were not free to do anything differently, thinking that “it really didn’t matter to God, anyway.” There are many such examples that we could cite from God’s word.

These things being true, why is it that so many today are willing to disregard clear teaching from the Bible by saying, “I don’t think it matters to God”? Is there some explanation for this? When I talk to people about the subject of baptism, it is interesting to see the responses when it is pointed out that the Bible clearly teaches that baptism is an immersion in water (Rom. 6:3-5; Col. 2:12; Acts 8:38, etc.), and that in the original Greek language, the word baptizo is literally translated as “immerse, dip or plunge.” These things are pointed out, and so often the response is, “I don’t think the form of baptism matters to God.” Then I tell them of a church in Oklahoma that baptizes by sprinkling rose petals on the candidate. Well, they wouldn’t go that far. But if it doesn’t matter to God if we change the form of baptism, then why should it matter if we change the element? Question: How do we decide what matters to God? Does he give certain people a special revelation telling them to disregard one of his commands, while telling others to obey that same command in the way it is stated? If it doesn’t matter to God how we are baptized, why should it make any difference whether we are baptized or not? Granted, Jesus did say, “He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved” (Mark 16:16), but why should that make any difference?

We discuss the Lord’s Supper and how the Bible indicates that the practice of the early church was to partake every first day of the week. Church historians agree that this was the practice. Few churches follow this practice today. Some offer the communion once a month, once every three months, once a year, or even not at all. “But it doesn’t make any difference how often we take it, so long as we do it to honor God.” I tell them of some churches that do not observe the Lord’s Supper at all, such as the Salvation Army and the Christian Science Church. Does that make any difference to the Lord, who said “Do this in remembrance of me” (1 Cor. 11:24)? If we are free to change the frequency of observance, then are we free to eliminate it altogether? Or what about using Coke and potato chips for the Lord’s Supper? When I tell people about a Methodist Church that did that, they are often shocked. But if we are free to change what we want to change, then why can’t others change what they think doesn’t matter to the Lord?

If we are free to change what we think doesn’t matter to the Lord, then where is the stopping place? In truth, there is no place to stop, except to stop at what the Lord has said. God makes it clear that we are to respect what he has said, without additions, subtractions or alterations. This was true in the Old Testament. “The secret things belong unto Jehovah our God; but the things that are revealed belong unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the words of this law” (Deut. 29:29). “Every word of God is tried: He is a shield unto them that take refuge in him. Add thou not unto His words, Lest he reprove thee. And thou be found a liar” (Prov. 30:5-6).

God’s nature has not changed under the New Testament. His thoughts are still higher than ours, and all we can know about what pleases God is what he has revealed to us. We are instructed to “learn not to go beyond the things which are written” (I Cor. 4:6), and are warned about adding to or taking away. “I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this book, if any man shall add unto them, God shall add unto him the plagues which are written in this book: and if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part from the tree of life, and out of the holy city, which are written in this book” (Rev. 22:18 19). While those words were written specifically about the book of Revelation, there is no doubt that the principle applies to all that God has revealed to us.

Dear reader, why take a chance on eternity? Peter urges us “give the more diligence to make your calling and election sure” (I Peter 1:10). Why would anyone want to take a chance with the attitude that “it really doesn’t matter to God”? Nadab and Abihu, Moses and Uzzah will all testify that it does matter to God. Eternity is too long to ignore the lesson. And there are others who will also be there to give testimony. Christ spoke of them in Matthew 7:21-23: “Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father who is in heaven. Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy by thy name, and by thy name cast out demons, and by thy name do many mighty works? And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity. ” Who are these people? They are religious people who believe in Christ and who evidently think they are serving him. But Christ says they are workers of “iniquity.” They were not murderers and thieves, as we might think the word iniquity might describe. The word literally means “without law,” thus referring to the fact that what they were doing was without authority from Christ. They presumed to do things for which they had no authority. That’s what Moses did. That’s what Nadab and Abihu did. That’s what people do today who practice things in religion for which there is no authority, thinking that it doesn’t matter to God, Don’t be one of them!

There are clear examples of this matter of doing what is not authorized, what is not spelled out in Scripture. In the Old Testament, when the exiles were returning from Babylonian captivity, they were seeking to put things in order with respect to their worship in the temple. Now the Law of Moses was explicit as to those who could serve as priests. They had to be of the tribe of Levi. This is recorded in Numbers 3:6; 18:2; Deut. 10:8, etc. Nowhere are we told that those from another tribe could not be priests. We are just told from what tribe the priests were to come. Now when they were setting the priests in their service, there were certain ones who “sought their register among those that were reckoned by genealogy, but it was not found: therefore were they deemed polluted and put from the priesthood. And the governor said unto them, that they should not eat of the most holy things, till there stood up a priest with Urim and Thummim” (Neh. 7:64-65). The point is, they could not serve unless they could prove that they were authorized to do so. And then there is the matter of Christ. Under the Old Testament system, even he could not serve as a priest, for he was from the tribe of Judah. This was recognized in Hebrews 7:12-14. In making a point about the priesthood, the author stated “For the priesthood being changed, there is made of necessity a change also of the law. For he of whom these things are said belongeth to another tribe, from which no man hath given attendance at the altar. For it is evident that our Lord hath sprung out of Judah; as to which tribe Moses spake nothing concerning priests.” Not even Jesus Christ had the authority to do something that was not authorized in the Scriptures! Jesus respected the silence of the Scriptures. The Law had to be changed in order for Christ to be able to be our High Priest. That is connected with the New Testament replacing the Old Testament. If Christ had such respect for the Law, then surely we cannot think that we are free to do whatever we please. It does make a difference to God.

— via Roswell church of Christ website (Roswell, Georgia)
——————–

-2-

News & Notes

Folks to be praying for:

The heart surgery for Joyce Rittenhouse’s brother went well.  He was released Saturday and is now staying with the Rittenhouses as he recovers.  He has been having a continual headache, though, which might last another 7 to 10 days until the loss of spinal fluid (from a spinal tap leakage) is naturally restored. In 3 weeks, he will be having a follow-up.

Deborah Medlock will have a pre-op with her surgeon this Tuesday and find out then when the actual surgery will be. It might even be Wednesday or Thursday of this week.

Penny Medlock is now hospitalized in Valdosta, but will soon be moved to Augusta.

Though the two epidurals Doyle Rittenhouse received July 2 reduced much of the pain he had been having in his hip and back, it came back last Thursday — but not as bad as prior to the shots.  He will be seeing his doctor tomorrow.

Let us also continue to remember the following in prayer: the family and friends of Billy Musgrove, Jamie Cates, Tim Kirkland, Elaine Abbott, Ginger Ann Montero, Ray Daugherty, Rick Cuthbertson,  Jim Lively, A.J. & Pat Joyner, James Medlock, Shirley Davis, Rex & Frankie Hadley, and Lanell Montero Dapello  
——————–

The Steps That Lead to Eternal Salvation

1) Hear the gospel, for that is how faith comes (Rom. 10:17; John 20:30-31).
2) Believe in the deity of Jesus Christ (John 8:24; John 3:18).
3) Repent of sins (Luke 13:5; Acts 17:30).
4) Confess faith in Christ (Rom. 10:9-10; Acts 8:36-38).
5) Be baptized in water for the remission of sins (Mark 16:16; Acts 2:38; 22:16; Rom. 6:3-4; Gal. 3:26-27; Col. 2:12; 1 Pet. 3:21).
6) Continue in the faith, living for the Lord; for, if not, salvation can be lost (Matt. 24:13; Heb. 10:36-39; Rev. 2:10; 2 Pet. 2:20-22).
——————–

Tebeau Street
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1402 Tebeau Street, Waycross, GA  31501

We are currently meeting for only our Sunday 10 a.m. worship service each week, due to the coronavirus situation. 


evangelist/editor: 
Tom Edwards (912) 281-9917
Tom@ThomasTEdwards.com
http://thomastedwards.com/go (older version of the Gospel Observer website, but with bulletins going back to March 4, 1990)

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